Hurt No More

Hurt No More

3.6 3
by Mario Winans
     
 

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Outside of some significant background details, nothing about Hurt No More is radically exceptional. It is, however, full of small surprises. Not only is it a Winans' record with a parental advisory sticker; it's also a Bad Boy release with production and instrumental duties handled by one person. That person is Mario Winans, whose return as a solo artist was

Overview

Outside of some significant background details, nothing about Hurt No More is radically exceptional. It is, however, full of small surprises. Not only is it a Winans' record with a parental advisory sticker; it's also a Bad Boy release with production and instrumental duties handled by one person. That person is Mario Winans, whose return as a solo artist was announced by a Top Five single that is literally haunted by the spirit of Enya circa 1987. Primarily a producer and multi-instrumentalist, with credits up the ying-yang for big-name gospel and secular artists alike, Winans' rebirth as a solo artist -- after a false start with Motown in 1997 -- is as rich as humbled, sincerely sensitive, male R&B gets in 2004. Lead single "I Don't Wanna Know" trumps Ruben Studdard's "Sorry 2004" as the most touching R&B single by a broken-spirited male for 2004, made by a subdued drum pattern, Enya's ambient presence, a sprinkle of piano, and Winans' hushed, pained vocal -- which begs his woman to keep her infidelities low-key. Winans has experience making a wide range of music for others, but he excels most at creating slow, sophisticated grooves for himself. Songs of this kind make up most of this album, and that aspect has a lot to do with why this record is successful. Winans doesn't wear the few harder-edged numbers so well -- "Pretty Girl Bullsh*t," featuring an ill-matched verse from Foxy Brown, is particularly out-of-character and disrupts the lush, sensual flow of the record. A couple minor blunders like that hardly prevent Hurt No More from being one of the finest R&B albums of the year. [A clean version of the album was also made available.]

Product Details

Release Date:
04/20/2004
Label:
Bad Boy
UPC:
0602498621721
catalogNumber:
239302

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Mario Winans   Primary Artist,Vocals,Background Vocals
Enya   Guest Appearance
Foxy Brown   Vocals,Guest Appearance
Shannon Jones   Background Vocals
Francesco Romano   Guitar
Sean "Puffy" Combs   Vocals,Guest Appearance
Loon   Vocals,Guest Appearance
Robert Ross   Vocals,Guest Appearance
Adonis Stropshire   Background Vocals
Tony Aliperti   Guitar
Erik Barbera   Guitar
Tierra "T Baby" Brown   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Larry Davis   Composer
Brian Elliot   Composer
DeBarge   Composer
Harold Hudson   Composer
Rob Paustian   Engineer
Mario Winans   Composer,Producer,Instrumentation
Jim Beeman   Engineer
Thomas McClary   Composer
C.D. Hawkins   Composer
Down   Composer
Sean "Puffy" Combs   Producer,Executive Producer
Mike Ging   Engineer
Inga Marchand   Composer
Jack Knight   Composer
Shannon "Slam" Lawrence   Engineer
Steve Conover   Engineer
Wayne Allison   Engineer
Adonis Stropshire   Composer
Tony Aliperti   Composer
Eric Hunter   Engineer
Tommy Jammin   Engineer
Chauncey Hawkins   Composer
Hitmen   Producer

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Hurt No More 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mario has a unique voice that is low-key, filled with emotion and the kind of sensitivity that makes you believe he has been there. This is a 'theme' album, one whose title signals the listener as to what the general message of the collection will deliver. His vocal style is personal and up close, the tracks are hip-hop spare, but warmed up a bit with enough strings, and synthesizer chord pads to smooth the drum sequencer loops which appear to be the staple of the album. What saves this album from hip-hop monotony is the fact that the songs are surprisingly distinguishable from each other, with intros that are each delightfully different from one another. In facts the tracks are probably more varied than Mario's vocals. After this outing, Mario will have to expand on the "broken hearted poor me" near tearful vocal deliveries. Also would like to hear a little more keyboard solo work here and there, and this is because the photos on the album keep showing him with grand pianos. We kind of expect it when it is touted to that extent. But, all in all, it is a good album, especially if you are in a low key mood on a Saturday afternoon.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This new album has got a lot to live up to conisdering his impressive track record especially with Producing. Well he certainly does it. A classic album filled with beatiful lyrics using his production skills to his advantage producing each track. Guest appearances keep the album fresh with the Family coming onto it (Welcome back Black Rob) and Loon rips another track. This is a must have.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Surprisingly with all the songs that were included in this album, the only song that was actually worth listening to was "I Don't Wanna Know" and frankly, buying the whole cd wasn't even worth the money just to listen to that one song.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mario Winans is doing big things. His album is blazing. He deliver great sweet soft ballads and uptempo hiphop dance songs. This is the 2nd best r&b album out right now. Usher album is still better. The first part of the album is mostly midtempos and ballads. The middle part of the album is the uptempo party songs. The singles off this album is going to be I Don't Wanna Know, I Got You Babe and 3 Days Ago. The deep ballads are 3 Days Ago and turn Around. The best uptempo songs are I Got You Babe and So Fine. Then there is the great midtempo track What's Wrong With Me. Go and cop the album.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album is absolutely exceptional, its too much for words, extrordinary.