The Hustle: One Team and Ten Lives in Black and White [NOOK Book]

Overview



The experiment was dreamed up by two fathers, one white, one black. What
would happen, they wondered, if they mixed white players from an elite Seattle
private school - famous for alums such as Microsoft's Bill Gates - and black
kids from the inner city on a basketball ...

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The Hustle: One Team and Ten Lives in Black and White

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Overview



The experiment was dreamed up by two fathers, one white, one black. What
would happen, they wondered, if they mixed white players from an elite Seattle
private school - famous for alums such as Microsoft's Bill Gates - and black
kids from the inner city on a basketball team? Wouldn't exposure to privilege
give the black kids a chance at better opportunities? Wouldn't it open the eyes
of the white kids to a different side of life?


The 1986 season would be the laboratory. Out in the real world, hip-hop was
going mainstream, Larry Bird and Magic Johnson ruled the NBA, and Ronald Reagan
was president. In Seattle, the team's season unfolded like a perfectly
scripted sports movie: the ragtag group of boys became friends and gelled
together to win the league championship. The experiment was deemed a
success.


But was it? How did crossing lines of class, race, and wealth affect the
lives of these ten boys? Two decades later, Doug Merlino, who played on the
team, returned to find his teammates. His search ranges from a prison cell to a
hedge fund office, street corners to a shack in rural Oregon, a Pentecostal
church to the records of a brutal murder. The result is a complex, gripping,
and, at times, unsettling story.

An instant classic in the vein of Michael
Apted's Up series, The Hustle tells the stories of ten teammates
set before a background of sweeping social and economic change, capturing the
ways race, money, and opportunity shape our lives. A tale both personal and
public, The Hustle is the story a disparate group of men finding - or not
finding - a place in America

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Winner of the 2011 Washington State Book Award for Biography/Memoir

A Seattle Times Bestseller

"Mindful of the lessons of Du Bois, Dr. King, and others, Doug Merlino shatters post-race fantasies and bears witness to immigrant and African-American struggles, past and present, and weaves them into a captivating, unsentimental and sometimes tragic story of dreams realized, deferred and/or destroyed."—Nigel Hatton, University of California, Merced

"The Hustle somewhat resembles the great documentary series Seven Up, which provides now-and-then profiles of kids shaped by the English class system. Only here, both race and class come into play. Most interesting and affecting about the book are Merlino's conversations with former teammates—resumed, as it were, after a 15-year gap."—Seattle Weekly

"You know those rare books that hold your rapt attention, the ones that you keep reading until the sun comes up? Doug Merlino's The Hustle is such a book. Part history text, part sociological study, part memoir, The Hustle is more than just a book about basketball. It's a book about America. It's a book about the country's past and present. It's a book that you have to read."—SLAM Magazine

"By reminding readers that questions of race and social mobility are at bottom really questions about what kind of people are granted what sort of life opportunities, The Hustle allows us to see our often recursive and overheated debates over such questions play out on a personal, frequently tragic scale."—Bookforum

"The book digs deeply, compassionately and intelligently into [race in America]."—TrueHoop, ESPN.com

"A provocative and candid commentary on the history of class, race, and wealth in Seattle and in America."—Seatown Sports

"A captivating memoir that sees racial and class divides in intimate personal terms, but with no easy pieties or excuses, no righteous indignation or blame."—Crosscut.com

"Anyone concerned with improving the U.S. educational system must read this book, which brilliantly highlights the problems and possibilities facing schools and students. At the same time, Doug Merlino also tells a broader story of race in America that vividly brings ten boys, and the men they became, to life. The Hustle is a wonderful reading experience."—Robert L. Bernstein, founder, Human Rights Watch; former president, Random House

"Working on an apparently small canvas, Doug Merlino has managed to look widely and deeply into race and class, idealism and dead-end despair in America. This unusual combination of sensitive memoir and incisive reporting tells us a great deal about the nation we are and the one we dream of. A fascinating and haunting book."—Adam Hochschild, author of King Leopold's Ghost and Bury the Chains

"As a boy, Doug Merlino was part of something special: A championship basketball team that drew players from both sides of Seattle's racial divide. The Hustle is his elegant, absorbing account of what became of his ex-teammates, and how their lives were inevitably affected by the color of their skin. It is impossible to read this book and not be deeply moved."—Brendan I. Koerner, author of Now the Hell Will Start

"[Merlino] paints a timeline vividly, in fact and circumstance, to unveil twists and turns, sadness and joy, conscience and tragedy . . . A great read."—Douglas Morrison, The Novel Road blog

"Merlino skillfully weaves the personal biographies with the biography of a city that relegated blacks to neighborhoods that were segregated and poor, to the margins of economic life, to public schools that were overcrowded and underfunded. The book's precise focus enables troubling considerations of the role of race and class in America."—Kirkus Reviews

"A very thoughtful, perceptive, and moving chronicle of the journey from adolescence to manhood."—Booklist

"Expecting a conventional basketball book? Look elsewhere. Although the central focus is ten members of a biracial boys basketball team, freelance journalist Merlino, in his first book, is writing about race relations and the changing socioeconomic experiences and expectations of five black and five white kids who came together in 1986 to form an Amateur Athletic Union basketball team in Seattle. The book provides remarkable insight into the fortunes and misfortunes of the ten kids who shared a court but never a dream. For Merlino, who was on the team, the titular hustle is the drive to achieve in today's competitive economy. Readers will witness the omnipresent racial divide in Seattle and the nation, in the workplace, and in a secondary school setting. The chapter on Seattle's Lakeside School, a private K-12 institution, is compelling reading for today's parents and educators. The former teammates whom Merlino traced up to the present include a prosecutor, a financial manager, a preacher/teacher, a writer, a street hustler—and a murder victim. This book, both memoir and social analysis, is an essential read as a recent social history and personal story of America."—Boyd Childress, Auburn University Libraries, Alabama, Library Journal

Library Journal
Expecting a conventional basketball book? Look elsewhere. Although the central focus is ten members of a biracial boys basketball team, freelance journalist Merlino, in his first book, is writing about race relations and the changing socioeconomic experiences and expectations of five black and five white kids who came together in 1986 to form an Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) basketball team in Seattle. The book provides remarkable insight into the fortunes and misfortunes of the ten kids who shared a court but never a dream. For Merlino, who was on the team, the titular hustle is the drive to achieve in today's competitive economy. Readers will witness the omnipresent racial divide in Seattle and the nation, in the workplace, and in a secondary school setting. The chapter on Seattle's Lakeside School, a private K-12 institution, is compelling reading for today's parents and educators. The former teammates whom Merlino traced up to the present include a prosecutor, a financial manager, a preacher/teacher, a writer, a street hustler—and a murder victim. VERDICT This book, both memoir and social analysis, is an essential read as a recent social history and personal story of America.—Boyd Childress, Auburn Univ. Libs., AL
Kirkus Reviews

In his debut, journalist Merlino traces the lives of his integrated junior-high basketball team and what happened to the players when the games stopped.

In 1986, Coach Willie McClain brought his basketball players, all black, from Seattle's inner city to the affluent suburbs to form a team with a group of white players. For a single season, these young boys—who couldn't have been more different—shared an initially wary then ebullient camaraderie that transcended race and class. But what happened after the season, asks the author, as these players made the transition from boys to men? Merlino returned to Seattle to find his old teammates and tell their stories. In one way or another, the white players all made their way; for the black players, however, the story was mixed. Through connections developed as a result of the team, all had the chance to attend quality private schools. Some adjusted, some didn't. At 19, Tyrell was murdered; 20 years on, JT still hustled on the street; Myran was in prison. All were lured by the seemingly easy money of drug dealing as crack devastated their Seattle neighborhood in the late '80s. Yet there were successes. Damian became a teacher and a preacher, Eric an auditor for the city with a solid middle-class life. None of the black players, however, lived without struggles in a class and racially divided Seattle. Merlino skillfully weaves the personal biographies with the biography of a city that relegated blacks to neighborhoods that were segregated and poor, to the margins of economic life, to public schools that were overcrowded and underfunded. He tells the story of the dispersal of Central Seattle's black population, as Microsoft and Starbucks made it ripe for gentrification. But the heart of Merlino's story is his teammates, black and white. He misses their youth and promise and loves and respects them all.

The book's precise focus enables troubling considerations of the role of race and class in America.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781608193493
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 12/21/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 466,358
  • File size: 702 KB

Meet the Author

Doug Merlino is a veteran journalist who has written for Wired, Men's Journal, Legal Affairs, and many other publications. He previously lived in Budapest after leaving Seattle. He now lives in New York with his wife.
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Table of Contents

Part 1 The Season 1

One for All 3

Black Seattle/White Seattle 13

You'll All Work for Us Someday 36

More Than Just Running Up and Down the Floor 52

Welfare Queens, the Huxtables, and Unlikely Champions 70

Part 2 Transitions 83

Moving On 85

Part 3 Money, Work, Career 109

Strictly for the Money 111

Boom, Bust 130

Gentrified 146

Saved 155

The System 171

Part 4 Schools 189

Our Kids Are Not Getting What They Need 191

Between Two Worlds 208

Lakeside Revisited 222

Part 5 Structure and Manhood 251

What It Means to Be a Man 253

Play Hard and Keep it Clean 270

Acknowledgments 293

Notes on the Sources 295

Index 298

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Wonderfully written!

    The Hustle is one of those books that will linger in my heart and mind for a long time. Once started, I was mesmerized until the last page was read. The description said "The result is a complex, gripping, and, at times, unsettling story." In my opinion, this book far exceeded that. This is a book about far more than what happened to 10 boys on a basketball team.

    Perhaps because of the author's journalistic background, there is a definite lack of condemnation in the book, even when describing difficult, heart-wrenching issues. This underlying respect for the reader's ability to evaluate the situation without being told what to think/feel was immensely appealing to me. Equally impressive was the masterly weaving of historical context throughout the book, creating a multi-layered story that provided the information necessary to understand the individual stories within the context of past and present. I learned a lot without ever feeling it was interfering with the story. And it changed how I look at some issues, for the better. Perfect for book clubs.

    A heart-felt thank you to the author, Doug Merlino, and all the members of the team, for sharing their lives in such a deeply moving way.

    *This book is crossposted from Goodreads. The book was provided free through the Goodreads First Reads program with the expectation of an honest review. My opinions are my own.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted July 18, 2011

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    Posted November 27, 2011

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