Huxley's Brave New World: Essays

Overview

Aldous Huxley was one of the most prophetic intellectuals of the twentieth century, and his best-known work was a novel of ideas that warned of a terrible future then 600 years away. Though Brave New World, was published less than a century ago in 1932, many elements of the novel's dystopic future now seem an eerily familiar part of life in the 21st century.
These essays reiterate the influence of Brave New World as a literary and philosophical document and describe how Huxley ...
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Overview

Aldous Huxley was one of the most prophetic intellectuals of the twentieth century, and his best-known work was a novel of ideas that warned of a terrible future then 600 years away. Though Brave New World, was published less than a century ago in 1932, many elements of the novel's dystopic future now seem an eerily familiar part of life in the 21st century.
These essays reiterate the influence of Brave New World as a literary and philosophical document and describe how Huxley forecast the problems of late capitalism. Topics include the anti-utopian ideals represented by Brave New World's rigid caste system, the novel's influence on the philosophy of "culture industry" philosophers Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno, the Nietzschean birth of tragedy in the novel's penultimate scene, and the relationship of the novel to other dystopian works including Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man and George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786436835
  • Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/28/2008
  • Pages: 196
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

David Garrett Izzo is an emeritus professor of English who has published 16 books and 60 essays of literary scholarship, as well as three novels and two plays. He lives in Durham, North Carolina. Kim Kirkpatrick is an assistant professor of English Literature and Theory at Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina.

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Table of Contents

Introduction David Garrett Izzo Izzo, David Garrett 1

The Nonconformers Pause and Say: "There's Gotta Be Something More" Coleman Carroll Myron Myron, Coleman Carroll 11

Political Repression and Sexual Freedom in Brave New World and 1984 Gavin Miller Miller, Gavin 17

Oedipus Against Freud: Humanism and the Problem of Desire in Brave New World Bradley W. Buchanan Buchanan, Bradley W. 26

Some Kind of Brave New World: Humans, Society and Nature in the Dystopian Interpretations of Huxley and Orwell Angelo Arciero Arciero, Angelo 46

"Laboring for a Brave New World: Our Ford and the Epsilons" Scott Peller Peller, Scott 62

Words Have to Mean Something More: Folkloric Reading in Brave New World Sean A. Witters Witters, Sean A. 73

Brave New World and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man John Coughlin Coughlin, John 88

"O brave new world that has no poets in it": Shakespeare and Scientific Utopia in Brave New World Paul Smethurst Smethurst, Paul 96

The Birth of Tragedy and the Dionysian Principle in Brave New World Kim Kirkpatrick Kirkpatrick, Kim 107

To Reflect, to Sit Down: The Hinzutretende and Huxleyan Characters in Horkheirner's and Adorno's Philosophy Angela Holzer Holzer, Angela 117

Brave New World as Prototypical Musicalized Fiction Theo Garneau Garneau, Theo 132

Deconstructing the Savage Reservation in Brave New World Katherine Toy Miller Miller, Katherine Toy 145

The Eternal Now of Brave New World: Huxley, Joseph Campbell, and The Perennial Philosophy Robert Combs Combs, Robert 161

"Everyone Belongs to Everyone Else": The Influence of Brave New World on Cinema James Fisher Fisher, James 172

About the Contributors 183

Index 187

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