Hyper/Text/Theory

Overview

In his widely acclaimed book Hypertext George P. Landow described a radically new information technology and its relationship to the work of such literary theorists as Jacques Derrida and Roland Barthes. Now Landow has brought together a distinguished group of authorities to explore more fully the implications of hypertextual reading for contemporary literary theory.

Among the contributors, Charles Ess uses the work of Jürgen Habermas and the Frankfurt School to examine ...

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Overview

In his widely acclaimed book Hypertext George P. Landow described a radically new information technology and its relationship to the work of such literary theorists as Jacques Derrida and Roland Barthes. Now Landow has brought together a distinguished group of authorities to explore more fully the implications of hypertextual reading for contemporary literary theory.

Among the contributors, Charles Ess uses the work of Jürgen Habermas and the Frankfurt School to examine hypertext's potential for true democratization. Stuart Moulthrop turns to Deleuze and Guattari as a point of departure for a study of the relation of hypertext and political power. Espen Aarseth places hypertext within a framework created by other forms of electronic textuality. David Kolb explores what hypertext implies for philosophy and philosophical discourse. Jane Yellowlees Douglas, Gunnar Liestol, and Mireille Rosello use contemporary theory to come to terms with hypertext narrative. Terrence Harpold investigates the hypertextual fiction of Michael Joyce. Drawing on Derrida, Lacan, and Wittgenstein, Gregory Ulmer offers an example of the new form of writing hypertextuality demands.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Journal of Communication

In this volume, 11 pieces explore the nature of critical theory in the age of hypertext, looking variously at computers and democracy, art and pedagogy, indeterminacy, hypertext as resistance, and other probings of the cultural, political, economic, and social effects of the emergence of hypertext.

Booknews
Scholars of literature and philosophy confront some of the issues raised by interactive hypertext, the 11 essays covering nonlinearity, politics, and the new writing. Specific topics include the reader's narrative, closure and indeterminacy, liberation and complicity, and an experiment in hyperrhetoric. No index. Paper edition unseen, $16.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801848384
  • Publisher: Hopkins Fulfillment Service
  • Publication date: 12/19/1994
  • Pages: 396
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Meet the Author

George P. Landow is professor of English and art history at Brown University. The editor of three books on electronic textuality, he has created several electronic hypertexts, including the award-winning Dickens Web. His widely acclaimed Hypertext is available, both in book and expanded electronic format, from Johns Hopkins.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Table of Contents

1 What's a Critic to Do?: Critical Theory in the Age of Hypertext 1
2 Nonlinearity and Literary Theory 51
3 Wittgenstein, Genette, and the Reader's Narrative in Hypertext 87
4 The Screener's Maps: Michel de Certeau's "Wandersmanner" and Paul Auster's Hypertextual Detective 121
5 "How Do I Stop This Thing?": Closure and Indeterminacy in Interactive Narratives 159
7 The Political Computer: Hypertext, Democracy, and Habermas 225
8 Physics and Hypertext: Liberation and Complicity in Art and Pedagogy 268
9 Rhizome and Resistance: Hypertext and the Dreams of a New Culture 299
10 Socrates in the Labyrinth 323
11 The Miranda Warnings: An Experiment in Hyperrhetoric 345
Contributors 379
Acknowledgments 381
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