I Ain't Marching Anymore

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
What a difference a year made for Phil Ochs -- his 1964 debut, All the News That's Fit to Sing, gained him a reputation as the most promising songwriter to come out of the Greenwich Village folk scene since Bob Dylan, and 1965's I Ain't Marching Anymore proved he was every bit as good as his press clippings said. Ochs had grown by leaps and bounds as a performer in the space between the two albums, and where Phil sometimes sounded a bit clumsy and uncertain on his first LP, here he brims with confidence, and his guitar work -- simple but forceful and efficient -- didn't require another musician's sweetening as it did on All the News. Most importantly, while Ochs' ...
See more details below
This CD is Not Available through BN.com

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
What a difference a year made for Phil Ochs -- his 1964 debut, All the News That's Fit to Sing, gained him a reputation as the most promising songwriter to come out of the Greenwich Village folk scene since Bob Dylan, and 1965's I Ain't Marching Anymore proved he was every bit as good as his press clippings said. Ochs had grown by leaps and bounds as a performer in the space between the two albums, and where Phil sometimes sounded a bit clumsy and uncertain on his first LP, here he brims with confidence, and his guitar work -- simple but forceful and efficient -- didn't require another musician's sweetening as it did on All the News. Most importantly, while Ochs' songwriting was uneven but compelling in his first collection, I Ain't Marching Anymore finds him in consistently strong form throughout. The craft and the emotional weight of the material makes even the most dated material "Draft Dodger Rag" and "Here's to the State of Mississippi" effective today, and a surprising number of the songs remain as potent and sadly timely today as in 1965, especially "Iron Maiden" and "That's What I Want to Hear." And if there are fewer jokes on this set, "Draft Dodger Rag" is funnier than anything on Phil's first album, and his cover of Ewan MacColl's "Ballad of the Carpenter" as well as his adaptation of Alfred Noyes' "The Highwayman" revealed what a strong interpretive performer he could be. His liner notes are pretty good, too; it's a shame he didn't write more prose. Literally dozens of singer/songwriters jumped on the protest bandwagon after the success of Bob Dylan and Joan Baez, but one would be hard-pressed to name one who made an album that works as well almost four decades later as I Ain't Marching Anymore.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/21/2006
  • Label: Collector's Choice
  • UPC: 617742061628
  • Catalog Number: 616

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Phil Ochs Primary Artist, Primary Artist, Guitar, Vocals
Technical Credits
Ewan MacColl Composer
Phil Ochs Liner Notes
Jac Holzman Producer
Bruce Jackson Liner Notes
Paul Rothchild Engineer
Barbara Longo CD Package Design
Richie Unterberger Liner Notes
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The second of his two masterpieces

    In I Aint Marching Anymore Phil Ochs protests against the racial injustice at home and the growing war in Vietnam. Most Americans were still just learning about Vietnam and Phil was already protesting our military involvement there. This album and his All The News That's Fit to Sing album are his two masterpieces and he deserves to be heard again.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews