I Always, ALWAYS Get My Way

( 3 )

Overview

From carefully aimed pouts and shifting blame to the threat of an all-out tantrum, this laugh-out-loud story for kids and adults focuses on the clever antics, advantage-taking, limit-testing, and childhood shenanigans of three-year-old Emmy. When Emmy spills juice and her dad’s pants get “orange-hosed,” she takes refuge behind Mom’s knee. Expecting a reprimand, Emmy is surprised when Mom tells Dad, “Now, sweetheart, you should let it be. After all . . . she’s only three.” Once Emmy discovers that ...

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Overview

From carefully aimed pouts and shifting blame to the threat of an all-out tantrum, this laugh-out-loud story for kids and adults focuses on the clever antics, advantage-taking, limit-testing, and childhood shenanigans of three-year-old Emmy. When Emmy spills juice and her dad’s pants get “orange-hosed,” she takes refuge behind Mom’s knee. Expecting a reprimand, Emmy is surprised when Mom tells Dad, “Now, sweetheart, you should let it be. After all . . . she’s only three.” Once Emmy discovers that she’s too young to be punished, she constantly wrangles her way out of trouble by proclaiming, “I’m only three!” and pulls a handy weapon from her arsenal of manipulative maneuvers. With hilarious, rhyming text and energetic ink and watercolor illustrations that capture Emmy’s expressions, from angelic to livid, readers discover that Emmy can’t get away with her outrageous behavior forever and that her actions do eventually have consequences.

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Editorial Reviews

Horn Book 2010
Bouncy rhymed text and humorous pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations follow little Emmy's path of destruction... .older siblings will be satisfied by the tale's ending.
Children's Literature
While making readers and listeners laugh, Emmy will remind many of their exasperating younger siblings.
From the Publisher

"Parkins'. . . cartoon-style ink and wash vignettes . . . focus on Emmy's yowls of indignation and insouciant smiles. . . . Newcomer Krasnesky writes tightly disciplined verse that never flags. . . . This is a fast-moving crowd-pleaser made for reading aloud."  —Publishers Weekly

"Krasnesky tells the story with flowing rhyme that accommodates the humor of the plot and heightens Parkins's comical cartoon illustrations."  —School Library Journal

"Emmy masterminds a (practically) foolproof plan to avoid trouble . . . Her animated expressions perfectly capture her scheming antics . . . She pouts her way into her family's hearts . . . The verse . . . does . . . partake of Silverstein['s] subversiveness."  —Kirkus Reviews

"Emmy gets away with everything—she's only 3, after all—until her parents reach the limit of their patience, and Emmy must face a new concept: consequence."  —Parent & Child Magazine

"Clever rhymed couplets . . . comic opera . . . lively vignettes . . . You do not have to love cats to enjoy this romp."  —Children's Literature

"Bouncy rhymed text and humorous . . . illustrations follow little Emmy's path of destruction. Mom comes to her rescue, but the mishaps pile up . . . older siblings will be satisfied by the tale's ending."  —Horn Book 2010

"Will resonate with parents everywhere . . . fun to read and fun to listen to . . . a perfect bedtime story . . . capturing the essence of a mischievous three-year-old."  —The Sacramento Book Review

"A playful, expressive, dramatic, and very loveable protagonist. [This book] will undoubtedly leave many readers looking forward to Emmy's future adventures." —Florida Reading Journal (January 2012)

Publishers Weekly
At first, three-year-old Emmy gets away with peccadilloes like spilling orange juice on her dad’s trousers and using her older sister’s art materials (“Mom told her she should share with me./ After all... I’m only three”), pinning the blame on her siblings. But when her shenanigans spiral out of control (an early morning ice cream feast, setting loose her brother’s pet lizard, causing the bathtub to overflow), her family wises up. “Mom pointed to the stairs and said,/ 'That’s it, young lady!/ GO TO BED!’ ” British illustrator Parkins (Dick King-Smith’s Sophie books) works in cartoon-style ink and wash, using vignettes to focus on Emmy’s yowls of indignation and insouciant smiles and having fun with Emmy’s more elaborate misdeeds. Newcomer Krasnesky writes tightly disciplined verse that never flags, sprinkled with parenthetical asides and modern phrases (“ 'That’s SO not true, Mom,’ Suzie said”). Mischievous Emmy is a little too manipulative and self-serving to sympathize with completely—but that doesn’t make her any less authentic a character. This is a fast-moving crowd-pleaser made for reading aloud. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)
Just One More Book.com
Dimplematic Immunity: Cute only gets you so far in the real world. Capturing the glee of victory and the sting of defeat, this hilariously illustrated rhyming book lets us laugh at our own (and our little sibling's) attempts to prove otherwise.
The Sacramento Book Review
Will resonate with parents everywhere . . . fun to read and fun to listen to . . . a perfect bedtime story . . . capturing the essence of a mischievous three-year-old.
Parent & Child Magazine
Emmy gets away with everything—she's only 3, after all—until her parents reach the limit of their patience, and Emmy must face a new concept: consequences.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Emmy, a mischievous youngster, admits to taking advantage of the fact that "she's only three" to "always, always get my way." Spilling juice on her dad is an accident, but soon she realizes that she can use that excuse to blame her brother, use her sister's "stuff," even get covered with dirt while burying "loot" taken from all the family. But Emmy finally goes too far. Sent to bed, she sadly contemplates being there "until I'm four." Jaunty rhymed couplets detail the impish Emmy's audacious acts and clever rationalizations. Parkins previews with humor on the jacket eight versions of Emmy's effective postures and facial expressions, as her family contemplates with dismay. His pen-and-black ink line drawings on white pages focus on Emmy while supplying enough cartoony details of her audacious activities. Watercolors add a sense of reality. While making readers and listeners laugh, Emmy will remind many of their exasperating younger siblings. Do we hug her or what? Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS—Three-year-old Emmy wreaks havoc on her entire household. From spilling orange juice on Daddy at breakfast, to adorning her brother's pet iguana in a bathing suit and letting the bathtub overflow, she's got curiosity and mayhem covered. Krasnesky tells the story with flowing rhyme that accommodates the humor of the plot and heightens Parkins's comical cartoon illustrations. "I tiptoed into Tommy's room/and found a way to use the broom/to get the lizard off the shelf,/entirely all by myself." As the star of this story gets into different sticky situations, she continually responds with the adage that "I'm only three," so not much should be expected of her. While her mother seems to respond to the little devil's helpless plea, it isn't long before things snowball and Emmy finds herself in a serious time-out.—Adrienne Wilson, Edith Wheeler Memorial Library, Monroe, CT
Kirkus Reviews
While little Emmy appears sweet, her looks are deceiving. She superglues her sister's skateboard to her dollhouse, claims her family's possessions as pirate loot and steals her brother's lizard for a bikini-clad bath-time swim. Emmy masterminds a (practically) foolproof plan to avoid trouble through tantrums and sulking. Her mother initially dismisses her poor choices-"after all . . . She's only three"-though Emmy's manipulation eventually runs its course. "I sadly closed my bedroom door. / I may be here until I'm four." Parkins's pen-and-ink cartoons utilize disproportionate facial features for comical effect. Watercolors provide dashes of varied colors against bright white backgrounds. Emmy is physically charming: Her rosy cheeks, disheveled hair and bare feet convey a youthful exuberance. Her animated expressions perfectly capture her scheming antics. Wearing solid oversized shirts, striped leggings and matching ribbons, she pouts her way into her family's hearts. Although the verse doesn't have the suppleness of Silverstein, it does partake of his subversiveness. Overall, the result is a youngster more exasperating than endearing, one that many an older sibling will recognize with grim delight. (Picture book. 5-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780979974649
  • Publisher: Flashlight Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2009
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 433,491
  • Age range: 5 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.80 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Thad Krasnesky is a writer and an instructor at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He lives in the Hudson River Valley, New York. David Parkins is the illustrator of 80 books and anthologies, including Aunt Nancy and Old Man Trouble, Fly Traps!, No Problem, and Webster J. Duck. He lives in Lansdowne, Ontario.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

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(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2011

    delightful book

    Every family has probably had a child who pulls these "cute" little ways to get out of trouble; to work mom and dad. We can all see ourselves in this well written, marvelously illustrated book.

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  • Posted October 2, 2009

    Suzie Housley, Midwest Book Reviewer

    Emmy is only three, but what a mess she can be. She spilled juice on Dad's pants but her mom came to her defense. Then when her brother made her trip and fall it was he who was blamed for it all. When she took her sisters glue to build like no one could, it was overlooked.

    One afternoon she was feeling up to playing a Pirate Queen. She gathered up everyone's lost loot and buried them by a tree. When her Dad caught her in the act she was unable to get out of all the condemning facts. As punishment he made her clean, didn't he know that she was just three?

    One Saturday morning she was a wake before any other; she made her own breakfast and left the kitchen in such a mess. When mother woke and seen what she had done she made her clean, she figured she was too sleepy to realize that she was three.

    Emmy wanted to play with her brother's pet lizard. She dressed him up in her dolls clothes, then decided to sail him in a boat, using her sister's shoes she knew they would make a good vessel. When she turned her back, the lizard decided to flew, she wondered where he could be. With a scream from her mother she knew that he had been discovered. Rushing to her side, she seen everyone's accusing eyes. It didn't matter that she was three. For all eyes were focused on she; as punishment for all she did she was banished in her room, she feared she wouldn't be out any time soon.

    Thad Krasnesky is a master storyteller. Through the expert illustrations of David Parkins, I Always Always Get My Way is a sheer delight to read and experience. With its rhyming storyline, a cast of loveable characters, this book will quickly become one of your child's all time favorites. Very highly recommended.

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  • Posted September 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The Little Twister

    Choices have consequences, that's plain to see; but it's not always obvious . . . when you are three!

    Meet Emmy, a three-year old tornado who challenges her family by pushing on and testing their boundaries for her. Watch as she storms through the house, kicks up some dust, and then sits back to see how it settles. Will they be able to outlast her as she whirls in and turns their world upside down?

    Initially, both her sister and brother get in trouble because of Mom's willingness to chalk it up to her age - perhaps you remember the terrible threes? But that excuse wears thin and, in the end, despite Emmy's amazing attempt to divide and conquer, both parents are able to see that, regardless of her age, this little twister needs to be held accountable for her actions. With a little bit of luck, the reflective time-out in her room will be just what she needs to teach the somewhat-spoiled sister that she does NOT always get her way.

    David Parkins' eye-catching illustrations are precious as he brings to life author Thad Krasnesky's little heroine and her creative commotion. The difference between a four and a five reader rating from me is that the rhyme is sometimes awkward and choppy; it's really worth four and a half stars in my book.

    This whimsical tale is sure to entertain and connect with anyone who's ever had a sneaky sibling. Once the laughter has subsided, it might also spark an interesting discussion about choices and consequences.

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