I Am That Child: Changing Hearts and Changing the World

I Am That Child: Changing Hearts and Changing the World

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by Elizabeth Rankin Geitz
     
 

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What happens when three American women put their faith into action in a developing nation? In I Am That Child, Episcopal priest Elizabeth Geitz proves that cross-cultural relationships among people of faith can change our world ... one person at a time.

Geitz welcomes readers to join her pilgrimage to an orphanage in Cameroon, sharing both humorous and

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Overview

What happens when three American women put their faith into action in a developing nation? In I Am That Child, Episcopal priest Elizabeth Geitz proves that cross-cultural relationships among people of faith can change our world ... one person at a time.

Geitz welcomes readers to join her pilgrimage to an orphanage in Cameroon, sharing both humorous and gut-wrenching wisdom from leaders and children who struggle against AIDS, global poverty and sexism. Along the way, Geitz and readers take a hard look at race and cultural privilege and find hope for reconciliation back home. The book concludes with study and resource guides to help readers engage global poverty efforts and build community across continents and across the street.

“ElizabethGeitz's odyssey to a Cameroon orphanage yields profound insights into AIDS, the criminalization of HIV, and racial and gender discrimination -- not to mention a narrative that is asbreath-taking as it is inspiring.” – John Berendt, Author of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

“This is the most compelling book about mission that is honest-to-God … and honest-before-God … that I have ever read. If it does not move us to contrition, affectionate love, and then to action, the fault is with us and not with the book or the story it tells.”

Phyllis Tickle, Author of Embracing Emergence Christianity and former religion editor for Publishers Weekly

“Geitz takes us into a brilliant world -- one seldom seen through Western eyes. If you see this world, I predict two things. First, you will not look away. Lastly, you will discover here courage and perseverance.” Michael Battle, Author of Ubuntu: I in You and You in Me

“… a touching account of learning and growing across boundaries of culture and economics in a Cameroonian orphanage where we see ‘the love of God materialized.’Geitz’ book will encourage Westerners to explore solidarity with companions in the Two-Thirds World – and with those suffering injustice at home.”

Titus Presler, Principal, Edwardes College in Peshawar, Pakistan, and Author ofGoing Global with God: Reconciling Mission in a World of Difference

“The stories unfold in short, lively chapters and take the reader on a fascinating journey. Elizabeth Geitz writes lucidly and engagingly of her own privilege and a pilgrimage that brought her to a renewed passion and priesthood; one hopes that she'll continue sharing more with us all.” – Sam Portaro, Author of Crossing the Jordan: Meditations on Vocation and Transforming Vocation

The Reverend Canon Elizabeth Geitz is an Episcopal priest and author of numerous books, including Fireweed Evangelism: Christian Hospitality in a Multi-faith World and Soul Satisfaction: Reclaiming the Divine Feminine; Gender and the Nicene Creed,and co-editor ofWomen's Uncommon Prayers.The former Canon for Ministry Development and Deployment in the Diocese of New Jersey, she is an award-winning writer and popular speaker and works closely with Sister Jane Mankaa and the Good Shepherd Home Board in Cameroon. Visit Elizabeth's website and blog at www.elizabethgeitz.com.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780819227782
Publisher:
Church Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
02/01/2012
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.60(d)

What People are saying about this

Michael Battle
Geitz takes us into a brilliant world-one seldom seen through Western eyes. If you see this world, I predict two things. First, you will not look away. Lastly, you will discover here courage and perseverance. (Michael Battle, Author of Ubuntu: I in You and You in Me)
Sam Portaro
The stories unfold in short, lively chapters and take the reader on a fascinating tour. Elizabeth Geitz writes lucidly and engagingly of her own privilege and a pilgrimage that brought her to a renewed passion and priesthood; one hopes that she'll continue sharing more with us all. (Sam Portaro, Author of Crossing the Jordan: Meditations on Vocationand Transforming Vocation)
John Berendt
Elizabeth Geitz's odyssey to a Cameroon orphanage yields profound insights into AIDS, criminalization of HIV, and racial and gender discrimination—not to mention a narrative that is as breath-taking as it is inspiring. (John Berendt, Author of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil)
Titus Presler
[A] touching account of learning and growing across boundaries of culture and economics that shows 'the love of God materialized.' Geitz's book encourages us to explore solidarity with companions in the Two-Thirds World-and with those suffering injustice at home. (Titus Presler, Author of Going Global with God: Reconciling Mission in a World of Difference)
Phyllis Tickle
This most compelling book about mission that is honest-to-God ... and honest-before-God ... that I have ever read. (Phyllis Tickle, Author of Embracing Emergence and The Divine Hours, and former religion editor for Publishers Weekly)

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Meet the Author

The Reverend Canon Elizabeth Geitz is an Episcopal priest and author of numerous books, including Fireweed Evangelism: Christian Hospitality in a Multi-faith World and Soul Satisfaction: Reclaiming the Divine Feminine; Gender and the Nicene Creed,and co-editor ofWomen's Uncommon Prayers.The former Canon for Ministry Development and Deployment in the Diocese of New Jersey, she is an award-winning writer and popular speaker and works closely with Sister Jane Mankaa and the Good Shepherd Home Board in Cameroon. Visit Elizabeth's website and blog at www.elizabethgeitz.com.

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I Am That Child: Changing Hearts and Changing the World 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Elizabeth Geitz's book pulls you out of your lethargy into a world where there is total reliance on God. This is the tale of the journey of 3 women that witness God's miraculous workings in Cameroon and of their continued involvement in Sister Jane Mankaa's orphanage. It shows that the time and efforts of a few can grow and have an impact in a place half a world away if we only take that first step.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RevDD More than 1 year ago
Story teller Elizabeth Geitz speaks through many voices in this compelling tale of the Good Shepherd Home in Cameroon: the voices of those who work at the Orphanage, the voices of doctors and nurses overwhelmed by the number of villagers in need of medical attention, and the voices of the children in the Home, who lost parents to AIDS and innocence to relatives who took them in and then enslaved them. Each orphan found his/her way to the loving embrace of Anglican Sister Jane Mankaa, whose voice describes both her vision of a healthy, supportive, unified community and the obstacles to reaching that vision. Canon Geitz adds her own voice, gently encouraging others to speak and insightfully probing the systemic issues behind the personal stories. Geitz’ voice follows the reader home, for we, like her, are children of first-world privilege and prejudice. Geitz has allowed the experience of a short-term journey to change her heart, and she invites the reader into a similar transformation, providing guideposts for how to act on the heartfelt compassion her stories inspire.
FeatheredQuillBookReviews More than 1 year ago
Elizabeth Geitz is a woman who, with two other friends, decided to go on a journey. She is an Episcopalian priest and a woman who had adopted a boy from Cameroon. She wanted to see him, she wanted to make a difference in his life - as well as the other orphans who were located in the Good Shepherd Home Orphanage run by Superwoman, Sister Jane. From the lush, green tropical countryside, past the banana plantations that look lovely and serene, to marketplaces that are so crowded no one can move - the three women traveled up the sides of mountains to reach this orphanage. They traveled with Sister Jane as she dealt with everything from a broken-down vehicle to bribery to checkpoints and men with machetes (and that was just on the ride there). Jane had a way of charming them all. Jane Mankaa had her own torturous history with her family in West Africa before coming to America to get a handle on how to open the orphanage she wanted to create in her country. Upon her return, she struggled. She is a woman in a man’s word. A Christian nun, she has to put up with everything from people stealing their electric cables to murder attempts on her life. People poison her - or try to - in order to get rid of the woman and her orphanage once and for all. A steel will and a beautiful soul is not nearly a good enough description for Jane, but the reader meets the children within the walls of this orphanage - the location that is giving them a chance at life in a world where their parents are dying of AIDS, where they are starving, being abused and overlooked. The children tell their stories, as Elizabeth Geitz gives readers a look at her steps - a journey that everyone will give their whole hearts to. There are over 50,000 children who have abandoned in West Africa. Most of their parents are dead from the AIDS virus, or the children themselves have been left for dead, abandoned, said to be unnecessary, and frankly it brings to mind the well-known saying: “There’s no room at the inn.” But one woman did don a cape. She doesn’t want riches and a pat on the back, she wants to work every day to give these children a better life. And in the back of the book there is a way that all of us can support this truly amazing woman and her children. Quill Says: “May We All Be One” is the motto of this orphanage, and after getting to know these children and their stories, I hope that motto can be adopted by us all.