I Don't Want to Go to Camp

I Don't Want to Go to Camp

5.0 1
by Eve Bunting, Maryann Cocca-Leffler
     
 

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Lin's mom has exciting news. She's going to camp—a camp for mothers only. But Lin is not impressed. She and her favorite stuffy, Loppy Lamb, have made up their minds. They are never, ever going to camp. Later, when Lin and her dad visit Mom on visitors day, Lin discovers that camp is more than a place where you get homesick. Camp is volleyball, canoe races,

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Overview

Lin's mom has exciting news. She's going to camp—a camp for mothers only. But Lin is not impressed. She and her favorite stuffy, Loppy Lamb, have made up their minds. They are never, ever going to camp. Later, when Lin and her dad visit Mom on visitors day, Lin discovers that camp is more than a place where you get homesick. Camp is volleyball, canoe races, midnight feasts, and lots of other ways of having fun. Lin wonders if camp isn't so bad after all. Eve Bunting's endearing text and Maryann Cocca-Leffler's bright and breezy illustrations are perfectly matched in this happy picture book about an imaginative girl who's afraid to stay away from home.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
At five years old, you too might dislike the notion of your mother going away from home to attend camp. Especially if you do not know anything about it. Lin and her stuffed animal, Loppy Lamb, discover the wonders of camp through a light-hearted but engaging story that begins with her mother purchasing a sleeping bag and harmonica. Lin's anxiety about the unknown is shown through imaginary conversations shared only with her dear stuffed friend. When her mother mentions Lin will be able to attend camp herself in two years, Lin objects and mom wisely sympathizes, knowing there are enticements to come. Mother invites the family to attend Visitor's Day and Dad, Lin, and Loppy Lamb bake delicious goodies to take with them. Once they arrive, they find mother has made many friends, attended midnight campfires where they enjoy marshmallow mushies, played volleyball and gone horseback riding. By the end of the day, Lin trades friendship bracelets with a new friend of her own, and she realizes camp might not be so bad after all. Illustrations in watercolor and pen paint a delightful and loving world where children feel safe to learn and express themselves. 2005 (orig. 1996), Boyds Mills Press, Ages 4 to 6.
—Robyn Gioia

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590780749
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
04/28/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
5 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Eve Bunting, author of more than two hundred books for children and adults, is the author of Caldecott Medal-winner Smoky Night. She is also the author of Girls: A-Z. She lives in Pasadena, California.

Maryann Cocca-Leffler has illustrated many books for children, including Bus Route to Boston.

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I Don't Want to Go to Camp 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Children are naturally close to their parents, but there are children who will practically never budge from their homes. These are the youngsters who will need sleep-away camp the most when they are older, but are the most likely to resist. This is particularly the case if they are the only, older or oldest child in the family. Ms. Bunting has done a virtuoso job in this book of helping ease that transition by introducing the idea of sleep-away camp in a positive light for the 4-6 year old set. 'Mom waved a letter. 'I'm going to camp,' she said happily.' ''Only kids go to camp,' Lin said.' 'This is a mother's camp, for mothers only.' 'Loppy Lamb and I don't want to go to kid's camp.' Naturally, though, Lin wanted to help her mom get ready to go away. They went shopping, and Lin was surprised that you get to buy lots of great fun things for sleep-away camp. Then, it was time for mom to go away on the camp bus. She asked dad and Lin to promise to visit her on Vistors Day. Lin and dad were looking forward to having fun together while mom was away. Just before Visitors Day, they made fudge and cookies to take to mom. Lin didn't know that people got goodies on Visitors Day at camp. They have a great reunion, and Lin gets to see what mom has been doing. She finds out that mom has been playing her new harmonica, paddling in canoe races, playing volleyball, having midnight treats, developing best friends, using passwords and secret codes with her cabin mates, riding horses, swimming, having campfire sessions, and making friendship bracelets. Lin thinks that sounds kind of neat. When dad and Lin leave, Lin hears Loppy Lamb say something. She asks dad to be quiet so she can hear better. ''Dad?' Lin said, 'Loppy Lamb wants to tell me something.'' 'Dad? Loppy says he might want to go to camp in two years when he's big.' 'He's such a baby sometimes, I might have to go to camp with him.' 'It's not that I want to go.' The illustrations done by Ms. Cocca-Leffler deserve praise. They use lots of bright pastel tones, done in strong water-based colors. The shadings and detail are marvelously subtle, and help create a relaxed mood so important to this story. You get a feeling much like in the Raggedy Ann and Andy books, except the palette is much more in earth tones and away from reds and whites. The story deserves praise from several perspectives. First, it doesn't overtly 'sell' camp. It just provides information about what a mom's experience is. Second, it never says that children should or should not go to sleep-away camp. Third, it paints the issue in the future since Lin (and your child) are too young to go to sleep-away camp now. Fourth, no one ever asks Lin if she wants to go. She simply expresses her opinion voluntarily in the end. Fifth, the book also helps your child realize that she or he can take a favorite friend along (whether a stuffed toy or a human friend). Sixth, the story also gives your child a way to talk about the subject, by suggesting that the issue can be discussed in terms of what Loppy Lamb wants. That can take some of the anxiety out of the issue. Beyond buying and reading this book, there are other things you can do that help. You can arrange to go see siblings, cousins or neighbor children at their camps on visiting day if you know that the child is having a great time. You can also go to a family camp where there will be children the same age as your child, and activities for the children. A short day camp experience in your own town is a good transition. I also suggest encouraging your child to invite friends for overnights. I know they are hard on your sleep, but they encourage the kind of socialization that is helpful for sleep-away camp and later on for college and independent living. Many of my friends still have their children living at home (at well past 30), often with their own children, and sometimes with spouses. These children never made it to sle