I Face the Wind

I Face the Wind

3.6 3
by Vicki Cobb, Julia Gorton
     
 

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Ever lose your hat in a strong wind?

Ever feel the wind pushing you from side to side?

Know why you can feel the wind, but never see it?

You will!

Renowned science author Vicki Cobb makes scientific principles easy for even the youngest kids to understand. Follow this book with a young child who loves to play. Bring

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Overview

Ever lose your hat in a strong wind?

Ever feel the wind pushing you from side to side?

Know why you can feel the wind, but never see it?

You will!

Renowned science author Vicki Cobb makes scientific principles easy for even the youngest kids to understand. Follow this book with a young child who loves to play. Bring along balloons. Find a windy place. Together you'll face the wind and see that learning is a breeze.

Discover science, and the world will never look the same.

Great hands-on activities and irresistible illustrations by Julia Gorton make Science Play a perfect way to learn about science . . . just for the fun of it!

Editorial Reviews

Horn Book Magazine
“Conceptually rich science for very young children...Cobb pulls it off.”
Publishers Weekly
Vicki Cobb continues her Science Play series with I Face the Wind, illus. by Julia Gorton. Beginning with a girl facing a strong wind, basic observations teach the properties of air to budding scientists. The mood is playful but the facts are specific and focused and Cobb includes experiments eminently doable by the preschool set. The digital artwork uses bold forms and creative typography to keep the tone breezy. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The "Vicki Cobb Science Play" series helps the youngest children understand scientific principles. An adult will want to help with these activities. A list of supplies to have handy is provided in a note to the reader on the first page. The supplies needed are a wire coat hanger, a pencil, a large plastic bag, two identical balloons or zip-lock bags, tape and a ball. This is an interactive text. Have you ever felt a strong wind? What did it feel like? Can you name things wind does? What is wind made of? To answer this question, collect wind in the large plastic bag. Twist the top tightly closed and you can feel the air inside. Using a hanger as a scale, weigh two empty balloons. The scale will be slightly tilted when one of the two balloons is filled with air. Air is made up of molecules. Rolling a ball against a leg can give you an idea of what it feels like to have a molecule hit. Roll it harder and you feel it more. Can you make molecules move? Try waving this book up and down. You can even make wind by blowing air out of our mouth. This is one of the best science experiment books I have seen for very young children. It focuses on a small number of concepts about wind and air that can easily be demonstrated. All of the materials required are readily available and familiar to kids. The illustrations support the text, providing additional clarification of the concepts discussed. 2003, HarperCollins, Ages 3 to 5.
— Kristin Harris
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-In this easy-to-read, easy-to-understand, stylishly illustrated explanation of the properties of wind and air, words fly about and form cleverly shaped patterns echoing the concepts described. Satisfyingly clear-cut experiments provide solid evidence and encourage further exploration. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688178406
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/27/2003
Series:
Science Play Series
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
258,089
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.25(d)
Lexile:
AD540L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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