I Hate to Go to Bed!

I Hate to Go to Bed!

by Katie Davis, Davis
     
 

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Brussels sprouts-yuck! The dentist-blech! And worst of all...bedtime! That can really ruin a kid's day. You have to stop playing and brush your teeth and put on your pj's, and you just know your parents are going to have a big party as soon as you're asleep. Aren't they? The feisty girl in this book is determined to find out! Katie Davis takes a fresh, funny look at…  See more details below

Overview

Brussels sprouts-yuck! The dentist-blech! And worst of all...bedtime! That can really ruin a kid's day. You have to stop playing and brush your teeth and put on your pj's, and you just know your parents are going to have a big party as soon as you're asleep. Aren't they? The feisty girl in this book is determined to find out! Katie Davis takes a fresh, funny look at an experience that is familiar to children and, of course, their sleepy parents. The surprise ending, with its playful resolution, will banish the bedtime blues and is sure to have youngsters scrambling to get to sleep!

Editorial Reviews

San Diego Union-Tribune
Davis' flamboyant art and her jazzy text are kid-perfect in every way.
Publishers Weekly
"Young insomniacs are bound to identify with the lively, theatrical heroine as she hatches one plot after another to escape her bedtime exile," wrote PW. Ages 3-7. (Sept.)
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Davis (Who Hops?) adds an irresistible spark to this tale of a crafty girl who tries to postpone her bedtime and catch her parents having a party. The narrator is sure she's missing out on something and repeatedly pretends to be sleepy and tractable so she can sneak up on them during their revelry--but alas, her parents are only reading the newspaper or flossing their teeth. Most of the humor is to be found in the bright, splashy cartoon acrylic artwork. When the girl is sent back to bed, her room transforms into a prison, its door striped with bars, and later into Siberia, where she bleakly shivers. When she gets up to fetch some water, then go to the bathroom, her unsympathetic parents "knew what I was up to. Apparently the water trick had been done before"; in the illustration, kids in colorful pajamas circle the globe, each raising a glass. In another funny touch, the girl's fuzzy duck slippers are in cahoots with her: they snore ostentatiously to feign sleep, sport earmuffs when she is sent to Siberia and look fiercely uncowed and determined as she declares, "It was time for Plan Z." Young insomniacs are bound to identify with the lively, theatrical heroine as she hatches one plot after another to escape her bedtime exile. Ages 3-7. (Sept.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Linnie thinks that after her parents say goodnight to her they are having wonderful parties with guests, balloons, cake and costumes. She tries scheme after scheme to foil her parents into revealing their secret activities and to include her in the fun. But each time, she is sent back to bed disappointed. Ultimately, Linnie finds the best party of all—in her dreams. Kids and parents both will enjoy this story while relating to Linnie's plight and her family's relentless efforts to get her to sleep. This book is intended to help kids identify and describe emotions. Linnie's face expressively shows anger, suspicion, excitement, determination, fear, happiness, sadness, defiance, and resignation. The author reinforces the book as a tool for understanding emotions with some activities on the inside back cover. The pictures could tell the story by themselves without the text. Linnie's actions and feelings are clearly portrayed in the bold and colorful illustrations done in acrylic and pen. Linnie's room is shown alternately as a desert island, Siberia, and a jail cell. The text is Linnie's first-person narrative of her nighttime adventures. Funny misunderstandings, understatements and ironies show up between Linnie's thoughts and the reality shown in the pictures. Kids will identify with Linnie and enjoy her mischievous dealings with her parents. This is an excellent book for parents to read to little insomniacs. Parents with little angels, who think sleeping is the best part of the day, might not want to give them any of Linnie's subversive ideas. 2002, Voyager Books,
— Sonya Goldman
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Certain that her parents are having a party after she goes to bed, a little girl is determined to stay up and join the fun. After trying a series of uninspired ploys-sneaking out of bed, making giant binoculars to spy on them, asking for a drink of water, and getting up to go to the bathroom-she bursts into the living room ready for the party. But Daddy's party costume is just his pajamas, Mommy's streamers are nothing but dental floss, and the young heroine decides the best party of all is the one she can have in her dreams. This predictable story is accompanied by amateurish cartoons in acrylic paints and pen. Helen Cooper's The Boy Who Wouldn't Go to Bed (Dial, 1997), Denys Cazet's I'm Not Sleepy (Orchard, 1992), and Russell Hoban's classic Bedtime for Frances (HarperCollins, 1960) are all more successful efforts.-Ginny Gustin, Santa Monica Public Library, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Kirkus Reviews
A humorous take on a child's typical reluctance to go to bed on time, from the author/illustrator of Who Hops? (1998). Told in first person, the young narrator is certain that the fun begins as soon as she goes to bed. Convinced that her parents are having a party without her, she devises ruses to spy on them. She builds a giant pair of binoculars, gasps for water, and hides under a blanket, but each time she's caught and given a finger-pointing, "Go to bed!" from each parent. "But I HATE to go to bed," she always replies. Black pen outlines the cartoon figures; these are nearly, but not quite filled in with bright acrylics, giving the art the appearance of a child's felt-marker drawings. In a clever contrast, the palette dims to shades of blue and purple whenever the narrator is in her darkened room, supposedly sleeping. Most children will relate to the anti-bedtime sentiments, and celebrate the party of an ending, where dogs dance and clowns cavort in the young girl's dreams. The parents' final sigh of relief is almost audible. (Picture book. 2-5)

From the Publisher
"Irresistible . . . Young insomniacs are bound to identify with the lively, theatrical heroine."—Publishers Weekly
"This pajama story is likely to elicit more giggles than snores."—Booklist
(star) "Children will relate . . . and celebrate the party of an ending."—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152019204
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
08/28/1999
Edition description:
Illustrated
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.40(w) x 9.31(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

KATIE DAVIS has written and illustrated seven books, including Who Hops?, a National Parenting Honor book, a Children's Book-of-the-Month Club selection, and an Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Platinum Award winner. She lives in New York. Please visit her at www.katiedavis.com.

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