I Heard a Little Baa

I Heard a Little Baa

by Elizabeth MacLeod, Louise Phillips
     
 

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Who makes a little growl and is hiding under the flap? Could that shaggy paw belong to a bear? A dog? A Cat? Young children love to mimic animal sounds and play guessing games. They'll do both in this delightful picture book. The cheerful verse and full-color illustration invite children to growl, purr, squeak and giggle all the way to the surprise ending.

Overview

Who makes a little growl and is hiding under the flap? Could that shaggy paw belong to a bear? A dog? A Cat? Young children love to mimic animal sounds and play guessing games. They'll do both in this delightful picture book. The cheerful verse and full-color illustration invite children to growl, purr, squeak and giggle all the way to the surprise ending.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
What could be making the sounds that are depicted on each page? In addition to the animal sounds, kids also get a clue in the text, as well as other visual clues, to help them figure out what animal is responsible for the sound. The animals are ones that they may see in the home environment (cat, bee, and dog), or have seen in books (sheep, bear, and pig). Originally a lift-the-flap book, it works quite well as a board book. A good book to help kids learn the animal sounds and to have a good giggle.
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
The interactive structure, animal sounds and bouncy rhymes of Elizabeth MacLeod's I Heard a Little Baa should appeal to little ones who love to busy themselves with the book Daddy is reading aloud. Each of ten poems hints at a hidden creature (sheep, dog, bear, bee). Kids can lift the corresponding page flap...and there it is! Louise Phillips' bright colors and whimsical cartoon animals are perfect for a preschool audience.
Kirkus Reviews
Using rhythm, rhyme, animal noises, and gatefold pages for the guessing-game element of surprise, this book should be an instant hit with the very young. A simple three-line verse on the leftþ"I heard a little baa; It woke me from my sleep. First I saw a wooly face"þis opposite a gatefold page on the right. Part of the animal pokes out; the page opens out to reveal the rest of the animal and the rest of the rhyme: "And then I saw a sheep." MacLeod repeats the sequence with bear, cat, mouse, snake, dog, bee (accompanied by a particularly childlike rendition of a fat striped beeþand never mind that the stinger is on the wrong end), and pig. She ends with one more surpriseþthe narrator himself, a little boy in a propellor-topped beanie. On the initial reading, children may miss the bits and pieces of him that show in the illustrations, but they'll love pointing him out during subsequent readings. Phillip's cheerful, brightly colored illustrations and their crayon-like outlines add considerable humor to the text. (Picture book. 2-6)

Forest Hill Town Crier
Happy animals, free-form illustrations, a lively rhyming story full of animals, sounds and a lift-the-flap surprise on every page is sure to be a favourite for readers aged 6 months to 3 years.
From the Publisher
The cartoon shapes of the creatures and the little bear that leads children through the riddles will be easily recognized by toddlers and preschoolers, who will shout out the answers before the rhymes are completed. The simplicity of both the language and drawings makes this a perfect read-aloud. Good fun for story times.

Happy animals, free-form illustrations, a lively rhyming story full of animals, sounds and a lift-the-flap surprise on every page is sure to be a favourite for readers aged 6 months to 3 years.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781550744965
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
06/28/1998
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 7.00(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Elizabeth MacLeod has written many children's books, including nine titles in the Snapshots Biography series; numerous titles in the Kids Can Read, Kids Books Of and Kids Can Do It series; Why Do Horses Have Manes?; What Did Dinosaurs Eat?; and Monster Fliers. She lives in Toronto.

Louise Phillips is an illustrator and textile designer. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

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