I Heard That Song Before

( 125 )

Overview

In a riveting psychological thriller, Mary Higgins Clark takes the reader deep into the mysteries of the human mind, where memories may be the most dangerous things of all.

At the center of her novel is Kay Lansing, who has grown up in Englewood, New Jersey, daughter of the landscaper to the wealthy and powerful Carrington family. Their mansion -- a historic seventeenth-century manor house transported stone by stone from Wales in 1848 -- has a hidden chapel. One day, ...

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I Heard That Song Before

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Overview

In a riveting psychological thriller, Mary Higgins Clark takes the reader deep into the mysteries of the human mind, where memories may be the most dangerous things of all.

At the center of her novel is Kay Lansing, who has grown up in Englewood, New Jersey, daughter of the landscaper to the wealthy and powerful Carrington family. Their mansion -- a historic seventeenth-century manor house transported stone by stone from Wales in 1848 -- has a hidden chapel. One day, accompanying her father to work, six-year-old Kay succumbs to curiosity and sneaks into the chapel. There, she overhears a quarrel between a man and a woman who is demanding money from him. When she says that this will be the last time, his caustic response is: "I heard that song before."

That same evening, the Carringtons hold a formal dinner dance after which Peter Carrington, a student at Princeton, drives home Susan Althorp, the nineteen-year-old daughter of neighbors. While her parents hear her come in, she is not in her room the next morning and is never seen or heard from again.

Throughout the years, a cloud of suspicion hangs over Peter Carrington. At age forty-two, head of the family business empire, he is still "a person of interest" in the eyes of the police, not only for Susan Althorp's disappearance but also for the subsequent drowning death of his own pregnant wife in their swimming pool.

Kay Lansing, now living in New York and working as a librarian in Englewood, goes to see Peter Carrington to ask for permission to hold a cocktail party on his estate to benefit a literacy program, which he later grants. Kay comes to see Peter as maligned and misunderstood, and when he begins to court her after the cocktail party, she falls in love with him. Over the objections of her beloved grandmother Margaret O'Neil, who raised her after her parents' early deaths, she marries him. To her dismay, she soon finds that he is a sleepwalker whose nocturnal wanderings draw him to the spot at the pool where his wife met her end.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Mary Higgins Clark's psychological thriller is set in and around a historic mansion on a sprawling 50-acre estate in Englewood, New Jersey, and revolves around a decades-old mystery.

At the center is wealthy industrialist Peter Carrington, implicated 22 years earlier in the disappearance of 19-year-old Susan Althorp, a young woman who attended a dinner party at the Carrington estate and was never seen again. Now Althorp's dying mother has publicly accused Carrington of murder. The allegation, which has been splashed all over the tabloids, brings forward people who believe Carrington was also involved in the drowning death of his first wife, Grace. Deemed guilty by nearly everyone, Carrington has recently remarried; and his new wife Kathryn, the daughter of a landscaper who once worked on the family estate, is determined to exonerate him. Could an argument she overheard 22 years ago as a wide-eyed 6-year-old child hold the key to her husband's innocence?

Mary Higgins Clark has perhaps crafted stronger novels, but her impressive storytelling prowess, intricate plotlines, and brilliant characterization and pacing, nonetheless make I Heard That Song Before a solid release. Paul Goat Allen
Publishers Weekly

At the start of bestseller Clark's riveting new novel of suspense, Kay Lansing recalls her first visit as a six-year-old to the Carrington estate in Englewood, N.J., where her father worked as a landscaper. Twenty-two years later, she returns to ask the present owner, Peter Carrington, if she can use the mansion for a fund-raiser. The two fall madly in love, and after a whirlwind courtship, they marry despite the shadow of suspicion that hangs over Peter regarding the death of a neighbor's daughter two decades earlier and the drowning of his first wife four years before. After an idyllic honeymoon, the couple return to New Jersey, where a magazine article has caused the police to reopen the cases. The subsequent discovery of two bodies buried on the estate causes even Kay to doubt her husband's innocence. Clark (Two Little Girls in Blue) deftly keeps the finger of guilt pointed in many directions until the surprising conclusion. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
For her 27th suspense novel, Clark (Daddy's Little Girl, 2002, etc.) turns to the founding figure of the modern Gothic: the mysterious husband who may or may not be a killer. Twenty-two years ago, Kathryn Lansing, a little girl visiting the Carrington estate with her landscaper father, overheard an argument over money between an unseen man and woman. That evening, neighbor Susan Althorp, 18, vanished after scion Peter Carrington drove her home from a dinner dance on the estate. Two weeks later, the Carringtons fired Jonathan Lansing, and two weeks after that, he disappeared as well, a presumed suicide. The police investigated but could never find enough evidence to indict Peter for murder, not even when his pregnant wife Grace drowned in their swimming pool hours after a party in which he excoriated her drinking. That's a lot of backstory, but Clark folds it into her narrative as expertly as a chef preparing a lump-free sauce. Once Kay Lansing asks Peter to host a reception to benefit the Englewood (N.J.) library, events move fast. Peter's soon swept her off her feet in an utterly unconvincing romance; Susan Althorp's dying mother calls Peter a murderer in a national magazine; Kay sees that her bridegroom is a sleepwalker; bodies turn up on the estate; the D.A. indicts Peter; his stepmother Elaine Walker, desperate to rescue her gallery-owner son Richard from his latest gambling debts, blackmails Kay with what looks like a damning piece of evidence. Kay knows her husband wouldn't hurt a fly when he's awake, but as a sleepwalker, could he be channeling The Moonstone along with Rebecca? Less peril and more mystification than usual. The conscientiously plotted result provides less tensionand a longer wait before Clark's trademark velvet-glove momentum kicks in. First printing of 1,000,000. Main Selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club, Literary Guild, Mystery Guild
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743583299
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Publication date: 2/3/2009
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Abridged, 5 CDs, 5 hours
  • Sales rank: 1,364,649
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 5.80 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary Higgins Clark, #1 international and New York Times bestselling author, has written thirty-three suspense novels; three collections of short stories; a historical novel, Mount Vernon Love Story; two children’s books, including The Magical Christmas Horse; and a memoir, Kitchen Privileges. She is also the coauthor with Carol Higgins Clark of five holiday suspense novels. Her books have sold more than 100 million copies in the United States alone.

Biography

The Queen of Suspense, Bronx-born and -bred Mary Higgins Clark has achieved international success against heavy odds. Her father died when she was 11, and her mother struggled to raise and provide for Mary and her two brothers. Clark attended secretarial school after high school and worked for three years in an advertising agency before leaving to become a stewardess for Pan American Airlines. Throughout 1949, she flew international flights to Europe, Africa, and Asia. " I was in a revolution in Syria and on the last flight into Czechoslovakia before the Iron Curtain went down," she recalls. In 1950, she quit her job to marry Warren Clark, a neighbor nine years her senior whom she had known and admired since she was 16.

In the early years of her marriage, Clark began writing short stories, making her first sale in 1956 to Extension Magazine. Between writing and raising a family, the decade flew by. Then, in 1964, Warren Clark suffered a fatal heart attack, leaving his young widow with five children to support. She went to work writing radio scripts; and, around this time, she decided to try her hand at writing books. Inspired by a radio series she was working on, she drafted a biographical novel about George Washington. It was published in 1969 under the title Aspire to the Heavens. (In 2002, it was re-issued as Mount Vernon Love Story.) Her first suspense novel, Where Are the Children?, appeared in print in 1975. It was a huge hit and marked a turning point in her life. Since then, she has developed a loyal fan base, and each of her novels has hit the bestseller lists. She has also co-written stories and novels with her daughter Carol, a successful author in her own right.

In the 1970s, Clark enrolled in Fordham University at Lincoln Center, graduating summa cum laude in 1979. A great supporter of education, she has served as a trustee of her alma mater and Providence College and holds numerous honorary degrees. She remains active in Catholic affairs and has been honored with many awards. Her publisher, Simon & Schuster, funds an annual award in her name to be given to authors of suspense fiction writing in the Mary Higgins Clark tradition.

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    1. Hometown:
      Saddle River, New Jersey and New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 24, 1929
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      New York University; B.A., Fordham University, 1979
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

I Heard That Song Before

A Novel
By Mary Higgins Clark

Simon & Schuster

Copyright © 2007 Mary Higgins Clark
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780743264914

1

I grew up in the shadow of the Lindbergh baby kidnapping.

By that I mean I was born and raised in Englewood, New Jersey. In 1932, the grandson of Englewood's most prominent citizen, Ambassador Dwight Morrow, was kidnapped. Furthermore, the baby's father happened to be the most famous man in the world at the time, Col. Charles Lindbergh, who had flown the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean in his single-engine plane, the Spirit of St. Louis.

My grandmother, who was eight years old at that time, remembers the blazing headlines, the crowds of reporters who congregated outside Next Day Hill, the Morrow estate, the arrest and trial of Bruno Hauptmann.

Time passed, memories faded. Today Englewood's most prominent residence is the Carrington mansion, the stone-castlelike structure that I had stolen into as a child.

All these thoughts went through my mind as, for the second time in my life, I went inside the gates of the Carrington estate. Twenty-two years, I thought, remembering the inquisitive six-year-old I had been. Maybe it was the memory of my father being dismissed by the Carringtons only a few weeks later that made me suddenly feel self-conscious and awkward. The bright October morning had changed into a windy,damp afternoon, and I wished that I had worn a heavier jacket. The one I had chosen now seemed much too light both in color and fabric.

Instinctively, I parked my secondhand car to the side of the imposing driveway, not wanting it to be the object of anyone's scrutiny. One hundred and eight thousand miles on the speedometer takes a lot of starch out of a car, even one recently washed and mercifully free of dents.

I had twisted my hair into a bun, but the wind tore at it as I walked up the steps and rang the bell. A man who looked to be in his midfifties, with a receding hairline and narrow, unsmiling lips, opened the door. He was dressed in a dark suit, and I wasn't sure whether he was a butler or a secretary, but before I could speak, without introducing himself, he said that Mr. Carrington was expecting me and that I should come in.

The wide entrance hall was illuminated by light that filtered through leaded stained-glass windows. A statue of a knight in armor stood next to a medieval tapestry depicting a battle scene. I longed to examine the tapestry, but instead I dutifully followed my escort down a corridor to the library.

"Miss Lansing is here, Mr. Carrington," he said. "I'll be in the office." From that remark I guessed he was an assistant.

When I was little I used to draw pictures of the kind of home I'd love to live in. One of my favorite rooms to imagine was the one in which I would read away my afternoons. In that room there was always a fireplace and bookshelves. One version included a comfortable couch, and I'd draw myself curled up in the corner, a book in my hand. I'm not suggesting I'm any kind of artist because I'm not. I drew stick figures and the bookshelves were uneven, the carpet a splotched multicolored copy of one I'd seen in the window of an antique rug store. I could not put the exact image in my mind on paper, but I knew what I wanted. I wanted the kind of room I was standing in now.

Peter Carrington was seated in a wide leather chair, his feet on a hassock. The lamp on the table beside him not only illuminated the book he was reading but spotlighted his handsome profile.

He was wearing reading glasses, which sat on the bridge of his nose and slipped off when he looked up. Retrieving them, he laid them on the table, removed his feet from the hassock, and stood. I had caught occasional glimpses of him in town and had seen his picture in the papers, so I had an impression of him, but being in the same room with him was different. There was a quiet authority about Peter Carrington that he retained even as he smiled and extended his hand.

"You write a persuasive letter, Kathryn Lansing."

"Thank you for letting me stop in, Mr. Carrington."

His handshake was firm. I knew he was studying me just as I was studying him. He was taller than I had realized, with the narrow body of a runner. His eyes were more gray than blue. His thin, even-featured face was framed by dark brown hair that was a shade long but which suited him well. He was wearing a dark brown cardigan with a rust thread running through the weave. If I had been asked to guess his job from his appearance alone, I would have said college professor.

I knew he was forty-two years old. That meant he would have been about twenty the day that I crept into this house. I wondered if he had been home for that party. It was possible, of course -- in late August he might not yet have gone back to Princeton, where he had been a student. Or, if he had already started school, he might have come home for the weekend. Princeton was only an hour-and-a-half drive away.

He invited me to sit down in one of the two matching armchairs near the fireplace. "I've been wanting an excuse to have a fire," he said. "This afternoon the weather cooperated."

I was more than ever conscious of the fact that my lime green jacket was more suitable to an August afternoon than to midautumn. I felt a strand of hair slip over my shoulder and tried to twist it back into the bun that was supposed to anchor it.

I have a master's in library science, my passion for books having made that a natural career choice. Since graduation five years ago, I've been working at the Englewood Public Library and am heavily involved in our community's literacy project.

Now I was in this impressive library, "with my hat in my hand," as my grandmother would say. I was planning a fundraiser for the literacy program and wanted to make it spectacular. There was one way I was sure I could get people to pay three hundred dollars for a cocktail reception, and that would be if it were held in this house. The Carrington mansion had become part of the folklore of Englewood and the surrounding communities. Everyone knew its history and that it had been transported from Wales. I was certain that the prospect of being inside it would make all the difference in whether or not we could have a sellout event.

I usually feel pretty comfortable in my own skin, but sitting there, sensing that those gray eyes were taking my measure, I felt flustered and ill at ease. Suddenly I felt, once again, like the daughter of the landscaper who drank too much.

Get over it, I told myself, and stop with the "gee-whiz" nonsense. Giving myself a brisk mental shake, I began my well-rehearsed solicitation. "Mr. Carrington, as I wrote you, there are many good causes, meaning many reasons for people to write checks. Of course it's impossible for anyone to support everything. Quite frankly, these days even well-off people feel tapped out. That's why it's essential to our event to find a way to get people to write a check for us."

That was when I launched into my plea for him to allow us to have a cocktail party in this house. I watched as his expression changed, and I saw the "no" word forming on his lips.

He put it gracefully. "Miss Lansing," he began.

"Please call me Kay."

"I thought your name was Kathryn."

"On my birth certificate and to my grandmother."

He laughed. "I understand." Then he began his polite refusal. "Kay, I'd be happy to write a check . . ."

I interrupted him. "I'm sure you would. But as I wrote, this is more than just about money. We need volunteers to teach people how to read, and the best way to get them is to make them want to come to an affair, and then sign them up. I know a great caterer who has promised to reduce his price if the event is held here. It would just be for two hours, and it would mean so much to so many people."

"I have to think about it," Peter Carrington said as he stood up.

The meeting was over. I thought quickly and decided there was nothing to lose by adding one final thing: "Mr. Carrington, I've done of lot of research about your family. For generations this was one of the most hospitable homes in Bergen County. Your father and grandfather and great-grandfather supported local community activities and charities. By helping us now, you could do so much good, and it would be so easy for you."

I had no right to feel so terribly disappointed, but I did. He didn't respond, and without waiting for him or his assistant to show me out, I retraced my steps to the door. I did pause to take a quick glance to the back of the house, thinking of the staircase I had sneaked up all those years ago. Then I left, sure that I had made my second and final visit to the mansion.

Two days later Peter Carrington's picture was on the cover of Celeb, a national weekly gossip rag. It showed him coming out of the police station twenty-two years ago, after being questioned about the disappearance of eighteen-year-old Susan Althorp, who had vanished following the formal dinner dance she had attended at the Carrington mansion. The blaring headline, IS SUSAN ALTHORP STILL ALIVE?, was followed by the caption under Peter's picture: "Industrialist still a suspect in the disappearance of debutante Susan Althorp, who would be celebrating her fortieth birthday this week."

The magazine had a field day rehashing details of the search for Susan and, since her father had been an ambassador, comparing the case to the kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby.

The article included a summary of the circumstances surrounding the death of Peter Carrington's pregnant wife, Grace, four years ago. Grace Carrington, known for drinking heavily, had given a birthday party for Carrington's stepbrother, Richard Walker. Carrington had arrived home after a twenty-three-hour flight from Australia, observed her condition, grabbed the glass out of her hand, dumped the contents on the carpet, and angrily demanded, "Can't you have a little mercy on the child you're carrying?" Then, claiming exhaustion, he went up to bed. In the morning, the housekeeper found the body of Grace Carrington, still dressed in a satin evening suit, at the bottom of the swimming pool. An autopsy showed that she was three times over the limit of being legally drunk. The article concluded, "Carrington claimed he went to sleep immediately and did not awaken until the police responded to the 911 call. MAYBE. We're conducting an opinion poll. Go to our Web site and let us know what you think."

A week later, at the library, I received a call from Vincent Slater, who reminded me that I had met him when I had an appointment with Peter Carrington.

"Mr. Carrington," he said, "has decided to permit the use of his home for your fund-raiser. He suggests that you coordinate the details of the event with me."

Copyright © 2007 by Mary Higgins Clark



Continues...


Excerpted from I Heard That Song Before by Mary Higgins Clark Copyright © 2007 by Mary Higgins Clark. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Introduction

I Heard That Song Before by Mary Higgins Clark

Discussion Questions

1. "It may be that I've set my standards too high, but ever since I was young, I've been into the classic love stories of the Brontë sisters" (page 29). Discuss any similarities between Kay's story and the stories of the Brontë sisters.

2. The novel alternates between Kay's first-person narration and the third-person omniscient narrator. What did you like or dislike about this format?

3. When Kay finds Peter sleepwalking from the pool, she asks herself, "why, in that altered state, did he go through the motions of trying to push something into the pool or pull something from it?" (page 50). What is the answer to Kay's question?

4. Of the following quotes, which, if any, do you feel is the main theme of the novel:

• "There are none so blind as those who will not see" (page 153).

• "Money! That's the cause of most crimes, isn't it? Love or money"(page 220).

• "But even when you're crazy about someone, at some point you can have enough" (page 289).

5. "But to anticipate something, and then to see it actually take place, is the difference between nightmare and reality" (page 99). Is Kay brave or naïve for standing by her man? Explain your answer.

6. The Carrington mansion itself is an important part of this story. What is its role and what does the house symbolize?

7. "I never forget the fact that I am their employee, but I am also, I hope, a trusted friend" (page 54). In this novel, the author examines the relationships between employers and their staff. Why is this significant to the plot?

8. Mary Higgins Clark hassaid: "I often will base my books on a crime. I will take a piece of a crime and go with it." Do you know of any sleepwalking crime cases? If so, how did the outcome of the real-life case compare to this fictional crime?

9. "I knew with certainty that the remains the dogs had dug up had been flesh of my flesh, bone of my bone" (page 147). Discuss how the author uses family in this novel — from Kay's relationship with her grandmother and the loss of her parents to Peter's role with his stepfamily to the dynamics within the families of the secondary characters. How do these relationships propel the story forward and help to create a murder mystery?

10. Mary Higgins Clark has been called the "Queen of Suspense." What part of I Heard That Song Before stands out in your mind as a great element of suspense?

11. Which character said?:

• "I've had other nightmares, and maybe they really happened..." (answer on page 95).

• "I had a new life, but some part of me didn't want to completely cut off so much of my old life" (answer on page 139).

• "Sleepwalking in this country is no defense" (answer on page 161).

• "It's so fascinating to be around people like the Carringtons" (answer on page 241).

• "A 'brown study' is defined as a deep, serious absorption in thought" (answer on page 251).

• "Don't you come here and try to scare me. I know the law" (answer on page 281).

• "It's you and me against the world — including the whole damn bunch of Carringtons" (answer on page 289).

• "I believe that there has been a terrible miscarriage of justice, and I share responsibility for it" (answer on page 294).

Reader's Tips

• Snoop Around: The author refers to Charles Lindbergh as once being the most famous resident of Englewood, NJ. Have your book-club members research who is Englewood's most famous resident today.

• Go to the Big House: The Carrington House is a fictional mansion but there are plenty of historic mansions open to the public. Find one near you at www.hgtv.com/hgtv/ah_travel_landmarks and treat your book-club members to a tour of luxury.

• Shhh!: Host your book-club meeting at a public library. Find one near you at www.publiclibraries.com. If you live in the New York City area, go to Kay's library: www.englewoodlibrary.org. If the library accepts donations, collect unwanted books from your group and donate them.

Mary Higgins Clark's books are world-wide bestsellers. In the U.S. alone, her books have sold over one hundred million copies.

She is the author of twenty-eight previous suspense novels. Her first book, a biographical novel about George Washington, was re-issued with the title, Mount Vernon Love Story, in June 2002. Her memoir, Kitchen Privileges, was published by Simon & Schuster in November 2002. Her first children's book, Ghost Ship, illustrated by Wendell Minor, was published in April 2007 as a Paula Wiseman Book/Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

She is co-author, with her daughter Carol Higgins Clark, of five holiday suspense novels Deck the Halls (2000), He Sees You When You're Sleeping (2001), The Christmas Thief (2004), Santa Cruise (2006), and Dashing through the Snow (2008).

Mary Higgins Clark was chosen by Mystery Writers of America as Grand Master of the 2000 Edgar Awards. An annual Mary Higgins Clark Award sponsored by Simon & Schuster, to be given to authors of suspense fiction writing in the Mary Higgins Clark tradition, was launched by Mystery Writers of America during Edgars week in April 2001. She was the 1987 president of Mystery Writers of America and, for many years, served on their Board of Directors. In May 1988, she was Chairman of the International Crime Congress.

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Reading Group Guide


I Heard That Song Before by Mary Higgins Clark

Discussion Questions

1. "It may be that I've set my standards too high, but ever since I was young, I've been into the classic love stories of the Brontë sisters" (page 29). Discuss any similarities between Kay's story and the stories of the Brontë sisters.

2. The novel alternates between Kay's first-person narration and the third-person omniscient narrator. What did you like or dislike about this format?

3. When Kay finds Peter sleepwalking from the pool, she asks herself, "why, in that altered state, did he go through the motions of trying to push something into the pool or pull something from it?" (page 50). What is the answer to Kay's question?

4. Of the following quotes, which, if any, do you feel is the main theme of the novel:

• "There are none so blind as those who will not see" (page 153).

• "Money! That's the cause of most crimes, isn't it? Love or money"(page 220).

• "But even when you're crazy about someone, at some point you can have enough" (page 289).

5. "But to anticipate something, and then to see it actually take place, is the difference between nightmare and reality" (page 99). Is Kay brave or naïve for standing by her man? Explain your answer.

6. The Carrington mansion itself is an important part of this story. What is its role and what does the house symbolize?

7. "I never forget the fact that I am their employee, but I am also, I hope, a trusted friend" (page 54). In this novel, the author examines the relationships between employers and their staff. Why is this significant to the plot?

8. Mary Higgins Clark has said: "I often will base my books on a crime. I will take a piece of a crime and go with it." Do you know of any sleepwalking crime cases? If so, how did the outcome of the real-life case compare to this fictional crime?

9. "I knew with certainty that the remains the dogs had dug up had been flesh of my flesh, bone of my bone" (page 147). Discuss how the author uses family in this novel -- from Kay's relationship with her grandmother and the loss of her parents to Peter's role with his stepfamily to the dynamics within the families of the secondary characters. How do these relationships propel the story forward and help to create a murder mystery?

10. Mary Higgins Clark has been called the "Queen of Suspense." What part of I Heard That Song Before stands out in your mind as a great element of suspense?

11. Which character said?:

• "I've had other nightmares, and maybe they really happened..." (answer on page 95).

• "I had a new life, but some part of me didn't want to completely cut off so much of my old life" (answer on page 139).

• "Sleepwalking in this country is no defense" (answer on page 161).

• "It's so fascinating to be around people like the Carringtons" (answer on page 241).

• "A 'brown study' is defined as a deep, serious absorption in thought" (answer on page 251).

• "Don't you come here and try to scare me. I know the law" (answer on page 281).

• "It's you and me against the world -- including the whole damn bunch of Carringtons" (answer on page 289).

• "I believe that there has been a terrible miscarriage of justice, and I share responsibility for it" (answer on page 294).

Reader's Tips

• Snoop Around: The author refers to Charles Lindbergh as once being the most famous resident of Englewood, NJ. Have your book-club members research who is Englewood's most famous resident today.

• Go to the Big House: The Carrington House is a fictional mansion but there are plenty of historic mansions open to the public. Find one near you at www.hgtv.com/hgtv/ah_travel_landmarks and treat your book-club members to a tour of luxury.

• Shhh!: Host your book-club meeting at a public library. Find one near you at www.publiclibraries.com. If you live in the New York City area, go to Kay's library: www.englewoodlibrary.org. If the library accepts donations, collect unwanted books from your group and donate them.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 125 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    NOT A BAD READ

    A first book that I have read by her. I normally dont often go astray from the few usual authors that I pretty much only read their works, but while at Barnes I wanted something different and after reading this book I was glad I decided to pick it up. A well written story from the first page to the very end, was a hard book to put down. Loved the characters, and was fooled abit thinking that the real protagonist of the story would be the antagonist, needless to say I was shocked with the ending of the book. I may check out a few other books of hers. Not a bad read overall.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2012

    Fun & quick read

    If you are a Mary Higgins Clark fan you will enjoy this light and easy read. I appreciated the fact that she didn't throw too many characters too quickly at you, but one of her shorter books. Too me the ending was too predictable but being a late night reader I appreciate an easy read once and a while.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2012

    Great Book

    Highly recommend to MHC fans - another great, glued to the book until I finished it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Good and easy read

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 30, 2009

    Great book!

    Good story line. Kept me interested.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2013

    Firebird

    Waited.firebird

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    A great mystery

    My first time reading a book by the author. Looking forward to reading more. This is a story of love and mystery. Loved the characters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 23, 2011

    Another good Mary Higgins Clark read

    Always enjoy her books. This was one I couldn't put down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2010

    Good read. Excellent for car listening on long trips.

    Pure Mary Higgins Clark. Everything you expect from her. Interesting character development, plot that keeps your interest and the hold your breath ending.

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  • Posted November 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I Heard That Song Before

    Mary Higgins Clark is brilliant as usual. This book is spellbinding. I started reading it and I couldn't put it down until I knew who did it! You won't be disappointed.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2009

    Easy Reading

    I thought this was a great book. It was very easy to read. It kept my interest and it just flowed. I love the style of writing that Mary Higgins Clark uses. It is just a good fun book to sit down and read and requires no real thought. Just good enjoyment.

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  • Posted September 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    WOW!!!! A MUST READ!!!

    This is my all time favorite by her!!! It is suspense, exciting, mystery, a page turner, and romantic, all in one i coundn't put it down!!!

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  • Posted June 22, 2009

    Great as always

    I love her books!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Wonderful

    Bored at the beach last summer, I picked up Miss Clark's book, I Heard That Song Before. My only complaint is that it's impossible to put down! If you are a fan of a good murder mystery, this is your book! The New England setting gives it a very Washington Irving-esque feel. It's a book that is continually making you yell "O MY GOODNESS!" Yes, read the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2009

    I heard that song before

    Good book. Fast moving plot with many characters. Kept the suspense right until the end.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    I love this Book!

    I love books that deal with memories. You wonder if the memory is real or was it something that was instilled in us? Mary Higgins Clark's I heard That Song Before does that. Murder, missing people, sleep walking and a secret church chapel brings this suspending novel to a page turner. I couldn't put this book down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

    A challenge until the end

    The plot has sufficient twists and turns to keep you interested and guessing right until the end. I bought it on compact disc for listening in the car and was disappointed when my daily commute ended and I had to leave the story for a while.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2009

    Very Good

    I enjoyed this book very much. Couldn't put it down toward the end!

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  • Posted March 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Heard that Song Before

    So much suspense, I could harley put the book down.
    And the mystery murderer sure fooled me!

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  • Posted March 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Good Read

    The story has some good twists that make you wonder about the main characters motive of marring this man accused of killing several people including her father, but in the end all is well and the twist of the real killer is appropriate. I liked it, it was a good read.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 125 Customer Reviews

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