I Is for Inuksuk: An Arctic Celebration by Mary Wallace, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
I Is for Inuksuk: An Arctic Celebration

I Is for Inuksuk: An Arctic Celebration

by Mary Wallace
     
 

Presented in the form of an acrostic, I is for Inuksuk highlights the traditional way of life of Inuit people. Each letter of the word "Inuksuk" is represented by another Inuktitut word — I is for Inuksuk, N is for Nanuq, U is for Umiak, and so forth. Dazzling full-spread illustrations begin each section, and opposite the first page, the words are

Overview


Presented in the form of an acrostic, I is for Inuksuk highlights the traditional way of life of Inuit people. Each letter of the word "Inuksuk" is represented by another Inuktitut word — I is for Inuksuk, N is for Nanuq, U is for Umiak, and so forth. Dazzling full-spread illustrations begin each section, and opposite the first page, the words are written in Inuktitut symbols. Readers then learn more about each Inuktitut word and how it represents the people and natural environment from which it comes. Throughout the book, small vignettes showcase Wallace’s love and knowledge of the Arctic landscape, its people, and its culture.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
This interesting, colorful look at arctic culture is a nice introduction for early readers. Styled as an abbreviated alphabet-like book, the author has taken the letters from the word Inuksuk to illuminate this remote culture. Inuksuk is the word for a tower-like arrangement of stones built by the Inuktitut culture to guide hunters or express personal meaning for a place. It is a way for humans to communicate in this vast land. Each letter in the word denotes aspects of the Inuktitut culture as well as the arctic environment. Animals, items of clothing, and everyday objects used by the Inuktitut people are identified and described. The bold, colorful illustrations are a fine representation of this frozen land. For each Inuktitut word used in English, the symbol in Inuktitut is also represented. Rather than telling a story, it is a brief look at a fascinating culture through names, descriptions, and pictures. Thankfully, a pronunciation guide is provided at the end of the book, along with deeper explanations of various Inuktitut words. Reviewer: Meredith Kiger, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 1–5—This book doubles as an acrostic poem and a rich exploration of Arctic life. The introduction explains that Arctic people have built Inuksuit, stone towers, as guides for thousands of years. They can mark directions, or food caches. They aid hunting, or mark memorials. Each letter of the word "Inuksuk" is given two pages. The first spread shows a boldly colored and textured painting and explains the term. Then each letter is associated with an aspect of Arctic life, e.g., "N is for Nanuq." The word appears in English and in Inuktitut syllabics. The following page gives more information. "N is for Nanuq, the powerful polar bear of the North." A few smaller paintings illustrate sentences about the subject. The back matter includes a reference to the Inuksuit in the book and a pronunciation guide to Inuktitut words. This book succeeds wonderfully as a simple alphabet book and as an exceptional exploration of Arctic life and culture. Older readers who want to learn more about Inuksuit and Inuit culture will appreciate Mary Wallace's The Inuksuk Book (OwlKids, 1999).—Amelia Jenkins, Juneau Public Library, AK
Kirkus Reviews
Wallace once again pays tribute to the Inuit people and their Arctic home (The Inuksuk Book, 1999, etc.). Unlike similarly titled books, this is not an abecedary; each turn of this work's pages reveals another letter in the work "Inuksuk," making it an acrostic. An Inuksuk is a stacked-stone tower used by the Inuit as a communication device. Introducing each letter is a double-page spread illustrating a single word, only one of which-Nanuq-is likely to be familiar to the majority of readers. Following this is another spread of smaller pictures depicting additional information about the same topic or a related one. From Arctic wildlife to the accoutrements of Inuit life, much of what Wallace presents will be unlike readers' previous experiences, and even the familiar is called by its Inuit name. Backmatter includes a guide to the meanings of the various Inuksuit seen in the text, as well as an invaluable pronunciation guide. Wallace's illustrations are truly a celebration-hauntingly beautiful and evocative of bygone days. Her color palette is shades of blues, browns and whites, reflecting the Arctic landscape. A stimulating look at an oft-overlooked culture. (Picture book. 5-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781897349571
Publisher:
Owlkids Books
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.24(w) x 10.78(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 Years

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