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I Know How to Cook
     

I Know How to Cook

4.0 7
by Ginette Mathiot
 

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The bible of French home cooking, Je Sais Cuisiner, has sold over 6 million copies since it was first published in 1932. It is a household must-have, and a well-thumbed copy can be found in kitchens throughout France. Its author, Ginette Mathiot, published more than 30 recipe books in her lifetime, and this is her magnum opus. It's now available for the

Overview

The bible of French home cooking, Je Sais Cuisiner, has sold over 6 million copies since it was first published in 1932. It is a household must-have, and a well-thumbed copy can be found in kitchens throughout France. Its author, Ginette Mathiot, published more than 30 recipe books in her lifetime, and this is her magnum opus. It's now available for the first time in English as I Know How to Cook. With more than 1,400 easy-to-follow recipes for every occasion, it is an authoritative compendium of every classic French dish, from croque monsieur to cassoulet.

Clear, practical and comprehensive, it is an essential guide to the best home cooking in the world: no cuisine is better than French at bringing the very best out of ingredients to create simple, comforting and delicious dishes. The recipes have been carefully updated by a team of editors led by Parisian food writer Clotilde Dusoulier, to suit modern readers and their kitchens, while preserving the integrity of the original book. The great reputation of I Know How to Cook has been built over three generations by the fact that it is a genuine cookbook: each recipe has been cooked many times, and because it is used by domestic cooks rather than chefs. And with its breadth of recipes and knowledge of techniques, I Know How to Cook doesn't just teach you how to cook French, it teaches you how to cook, period.

In the tradition of Phaidon's other culinary bibles, The Silver Spoon, 1080 Recipes and Vefa's Kitchen, I Know How to Cook offers menus by celebrated French bistro chefs at the end of the book, including recipes by Daniel Boulud and Francois Payard.

Editorial Reviews

First published in 1932, this 1,072-page magnum opus has been called "The Silver Spoon of French cuisine." With its more 1,200 recipes, I Know How to Cook (Je sais cuisiner) might qualify on quantity alone, but this is no messy grab-bag of assorted dishes; author Ginette Mathiot (1907-98) labored long and hard to create an authoritative French cookbook that would stand the test of time. Now available for the first time in English -- and carefully updated to suit modern readers and American kitchens -- this lifetime recipe book reference earns an honored place on any serious cook's bookshelf.
Christine Muhlke
With up to six recipes per page, this translation by Imogen Forster is more Joy of Cooking than Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Like Joy, Mathiot's book has been updated through the years. Considerable visual charm aside, it earns its chunk of shelf space with unfamiliar vintage dishes like potage a l'aurore, sauce batarde and sheep's foot remoulade.
—The New York Times
From the Publisher
"

I Know How to Cook-all 975 pages and 5.2 pounds of it-meets this high practical standards - it includes everything you need to know-about tools, techniques, ingredient choice and menu-building-to take on almost any reasonable home-cooking challenge with Gallic flair."—The Wall Street Journal

"

You'll relish Mathiot's many delicious sauces, vegetables and salads. "—Energy Times

"

Pure French cuisine. "—Associated Press"

A comprehensive collection. . . Under Mathiot's guidance, the vanilla souffl é did exactly as told, which is really all you can ask. "—The New York Times Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780714848044
Publisher:
Phaidon Press
Publication date:
01/01/2009
Pages:
1072

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Ginette Mathiot (1907-1998), Officier de la Legion d'honneur, taught three generations how to cook in France and is the ultimate authority on French home cooking. She wrote more than 30 best-selling cookbooks, covering all subjects in French cuisine I Know How to Cook was her definitive, most comprehensive work, which brings together recipes for every classic French dish.

About the Contributor

Clotilde Dusoulier lives in Paris. Her award-winning blog, Chocolate & Zucchini, first launched in 2003.

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I Know How to Cook 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
CrazyJosephineDavolo More than 1 year ago
As my significant other is a Frenchman who is now an American citizen, it was important to him that I learn to master French home cooking as this was the stuff he grew up with.This book is the french version of "Joy"..Like Joy of Cooking, "I Know How To Cook" actually "talks" to you. The recipes are pared down and simple. Now..if you are interested in French every-day cooking, I would recommend this rather than the Julia Child books. In all honesty, I'm one of those people who find Julia Child's books very complicated. Ginette Mathiot has THE simplest and easiest Bouef Bourgunion of all time. IN addition, it is more than a "french" cookbook, it is just a great normal cookbook. Excellent book!
LizKelly More than 1 year ago
Je Sais Cuisiner first came out in about the '30s, and became the French equivalent to America's The Joy of Cooking. It's the cookbook that French homemakers used to learn and master French cooking --as opposed to a Julia Child-esque cookbook, which is really meant more for the chef. The tragedy is that it took 70 years to get an English translation of this masterwork. The good news is: it was worth the wait. The big, fat Larousse Gastronomique-sized book is the antidote to all those slick new cookbooks that are all pictures and not many real recipes. Try the boeuf bourgiugnon in I Know How to Cook. Unlike Julia's, this one has a mere five steps, and it's decidedly authentic. After all, it's the recipe everyday French folks would use.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Aside from loving the artwork, which caught my eye, I love the layout, the simplicity, I don't think any young cook will be overwhelmed by this book. And they will probably be a much better cook sooner than they might otherwise be.
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