I Like Where I Am

I Like Where I Am

by Jessica Harper, G. Brian Karas
     
 

This boy has trouble.  The movers are here and they're loading the truck without a care for his feelings.

’Cause I like my room and I like my school, And we live real close to a swimming pool, And my best friend lives around the block. Why move to a place called Little Rock Anyway?  

Any child who has ever had to move will relate to the

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Overview

This boy has trouble.  The movers are here and they're loading the truck without a care for his feelings.

’Cause I like my room and I like my school, And we live real close to a swimming pool, And my best friend lives around the block. Why move to a place called Little Rock Anyway?  

Any child who has ever had to move will relate to the feelings of loss and also rejoice in the boy's newfound pleasures when he gets to his new neighborhood.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
One of the most comforting books about moving you will ever read—and that's comforting with a capital C! The clever rhyming rhythm is reminiscent of "Trouble in River City" (from the Music Man), but probably only the parents and grandparent readers will catch that. Moving anywhere is traumatic enough, but for a six year old (like the boy in this story) it may as well be to a whole new world. Karas' interpretive illustrations uniquely portray the emotions involved within a family: parents lovingly supporting each other; baby sister pretty much oblivious to the commotion; one child donning his most frightening costume complete with cowboy hat and scuba flippers to keep the movers at bay; and giant moving men arrive to move your life to, of all places, Little Rock! But it is still comforting, and here's the warm, fuzzy part: he has a new best friend just up the block, his room is okay and so is school, and he has his own kitten. What could be better than that? Memories of his other neighborhood are evident, but he likes where he is, even in Little Rock. 2004, G P Putnam's Sons, Ages 4 to 8.
—Elizabeth Young
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-In a rhythmic and rhyming text, a six-year-old expresses his feelings about his family's impending relocation. He likes his neighborhood, his school, and his friends, and has doubts about living in a place called Little Rock. As the movers carry out boxes, he feels powerless to stop them: "And I think (but I'm too scared to say),/Oh, why don't you just go away!/Take your truck and take your Trouble and/Move somebody else!" Finally, his mother senses his unhappiness and takes him on her lap and rocks and sings to him amid all of the chaos. He sheds his tears and is comforted but is still apprehensive. After the move takes place, he discovers that he likes his new environs, but will always keep fond memories of his old home. Harper presents an honest, comforting depiction of what can often be a traumatic event. The text clearly captures a child's view of a world in which the adults are in charge and the youngster feels lost in the shuffle. Karas's realistic and playful illustrations in colored pencil, gouache, and acrylic add depth to the story. The endpapers show cartons with labels such as "magic tricks," "spy stuff," and "comic books." A good choice to initiate a family discussion about moving.-Linda Staskus, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Lyrical text and cartoonish illustrations give life to an otherwise prosaic moving-is-not-so-bad tale. A little boy has "Trouble" on moving day because he likes where he is. "And my best friend lives around the block. / Why move to a place called Little Rock / Anyway?" he choruses. Humorous images provide counterpoint to the boy's sadness: baby sister pouring milk on her head; the boy guarding his room with a toy light saber while wearing flippers and cowboy hat; goateed moving men struggling with a box full of rocks, including shiny rocks, skipping rocks, and big rocks. Of course, the new house isn't so bad, after all. In Little Rock, the boy gets his own kitten and a new (for some reason nearly identical) best friend. Some nice details, such as the car's different license plate at the new house, will help explain moving to a child. Those who buy this to calm recalcitrant young movers should take the time to read the rollicking, rhythmic, fun verse aloud. (Picture book. 5-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399234798
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/28/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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