I Lost My Tooth in Africa

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Overview


Coretta Scott King Honor author/artist Baba Wague Diakite and his 12-year-old daughter, Penda, create a charming, original adventure story about losing a first tooth while visiting family in Mali.

More than anything, Amina wants to lose her loose tooth while visiting her family in Mali, West Africa. Only then can she put it under a gourd for the African tooth fairy, who will exchange it for two chickens! Happily this happens, and even better, ...

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0439662265 Ex-library: stickers, stamps. Cracked Binding. Great reading copy.

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Overview


Coretta Scott King Honor author/artist Baba Wague Diakite and his 12-year-old daughter, Penda, create a charming, original adventure story about losing a first tooth while visiting family in Mali.

More than anything, Amina wants to lose her loose tooth while visiting her family in Mali, West Africa. Only then can she put it under a gourd for the African tooth fairy, who will exchange it for two chickens! Happily this happens, and even better, the chickens lay eggs. But will the eggs hatch before it's time to return home to America?

In this fresh, spontaneous story that is infused with close family warmth, Penda June Diakite joins forces with her award-winning author/artist father to give a charming peek at everyday life in Mali.

While visiting her father's family in Mali, a young girl loses a tooth, places it under a calabash, and receives a hen and a rooster from the African Tooth Fairy.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Kirkus 12/15/05
Category: CHILDREN'S
Penda, the author, and Amina, the subject of her older sister's book, are the children of the inventive Malian author/illustrator who has shared his culture through retellings of traditional folktales and creative ceramic-tile illustrations with distinctive borders. Now the father uses his art detailing village life in Mali to illustrate a story written by his elder daughter when she was eight. Instead of getting money from the Tooth Fairy, children in Mali get a chicken. Born in Portland, Ore., Amina loses her tooth on a vacation trip to Mali and gets two chickens, a hen and a rooster. When they begin to lay eggs, she hopes that she will see the baby chicks before she has to return home. Diakité includes a recipe for Malian onion sauce, mentioned in the text, a glossary and a goodnight song in Bambara, one of the languages used in Mali. The young author's descriptions offer an amusing introduction to one African country, and an excellent way to encourage children to start writing their own family stories. (Picture book. 5-8)

SLJ
DIAKITÉ, Penda. I Lost My Tooth in Africa. illus. by Baba Wagué Diakité. unpaged. glossary. CIP. Scholastic. Jan. 2006. RTE $16.99. ISBN 0-439-66226-5. LC 2004001933.
K-Gr 4–This story recounts a child's visit to Mali, where she loses her tooth. After she hides it under a calabash, she waits for the African Tooth Fairy to replace it with a chicken. When her patience runs out and she returns to the gourd to retrieve her tooth, a chicken and a rooster emerge. She is delighted. The strength and enduring warmth of her African extended family emerge fully through thoughtful detail. Grandma N'na gives her a blessing each morning: “May you rise high with strength and knowledge.” When the child returns home to Oregon, Uncle Madou volunteers to take care of the chickens until her return. The vivid ceramic-tile illustrations expand the text, revealing a range of animals, houses, and greenery. At the end are the words to Grandma's “Good Night Song,” the recipe for African Onion Sauce, and a glossary of Bambara words, all of which add to the authentic feel of the story. In his illustrator's note, Baba Diakité states, “Storytelling is a gift to me from my elders and I simply wanted to pass this gift along to my children.” He has succeeded, as his artistry supports his daughter's storytelling beautifully.–Alexa L. Sandman, Kent State University, OH

2006-01-02 PW
The creator ofThe Magic Gourd teams up with his teenage daughter for this story, based on the time the author's younger sister, Amina, actually did lose a tooth in Mali, while visiting their father's family. "My dad says if you lose a tooth in Africa and put it under a gourd, you will get a chicken from the African Tooth Fairy!... So I try tricks with my tongue to help it come out faster," writes Diakité, narrating as her sister, Amina. As the heroine waits for the tooth to come out, she also describes a fascinating daily rhythm within her paternal grandmother's African home, depicted as a walled compound. "Aunt Kadja has made my favorite dinner. It's rice and onion sauce with African eggplant and tiny noodles. We all eat together around one big bowl. Everyone eats with their right hand." After dinner, neighbors come by to play games and tell stories. With often whimsical touches, Baba Wagué Diakité illustrates a vibrant life among banana palms, birds and brightly dressed relatives and friends. Patterned borders surround each illustration, created on a ceramic tile (e.g., feathers and eggs decorate the scene of Amina's new hen laying eggs; even loose teeth come into play). Young readers may well be intrigued by how universal a milestone it is to lose a tooth, while learning the unique lifestyle of this warm and welcoming West African family. Ages 4-8.(Jan.)

BCCB
With text by thirteen-year-old Penda Diakité and illustratio

Publishers Weekly
The creator of The Magic Gourd teams up with his teenage daughter for this story, based on the time the author's younger sister, Amina, actually did lose a tooth in Mali, while visiting their father's family. "My dad says if you lose a tooth in Africa and put it under a gourd, you will get a chicken from the African Tooth Fairy!... So I try tricks with my tongue to help it come out faster," writes Diakit , narrating as her sister, Amina. As the heroine waits for the tooth to come out, she also describes a fascinating daily rhythm within her paternal grandmother's African home, depicted as a walled compound. "Aunt Kadja has made my favorite dinner. It's rice and onion sauce with African eggplant and tiny noodles. We all eat together around one big bowl. Everyone eats with their right hand." After dinner, neighbors come by to play games and tell stories. With often whimsical touches, Baba Wagu Diakit illustrates a vibrant life among banana palms, birds and brightly dressed relatives and friends. Patterned borders surround each illustration, created on a ceramic tile (e.g., feathers and eggs decorate the scene of Amina's new hen laying eggs; even loose teeth come into play). Young readers may well be intrigued by how universal a milestone it is to lose a tooth, while learning the unique lifestyle of this warm and welcoming West African family. Ages 4-8. (Jan.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Amina is on her way to Africa. It is there she will visit her father's family in Bamako, Mali. Amina is very excited for her big trip but she is also very nervous. It is a long flight, through many countries. Amina is also nervous because she has a loose tooth and is afraid she will lose it during her visit. Her nervousness turns to excitement when her papa tells her she will get a chicken from the African Tooth Fairy if her tooth falls out during their visit. Each day, Amina wiggles and wiggles her tooth but nothing. Then one morning as she brushes her teeth, out it pops! Amina rushes to put her tooth under the calabash gourd near her bedroom window, just as her father instructed her to. Later, she can wait no longer and must peek underneath to see if her tooth is still there. To her surprise, Amina finds not one, but two chickens from the African Tooth Fairy! She nurtures and cares for her chickens, a male and a female. Within days, eggs appear in their nest. She is so excited she can barely stand it. In twenty-one days, her chicks will be born. But just before the eggs are due to hatch, Amina's father tells her it is time to leave. Amina is sad to leave her grandmother, aunts and uncles, Africa, and her chickens. If only the eggs had hatched. As Amina says "kawn-bay," or "good-bye" to her family and friends and the traditions of Africa, she heads to the hen house to say one last farewell to her hen and rooster. She can barely believe it when she peeks inside. A chick is hatching out of an egg... then another... and another! Amina is so happy to see the new babies. When her uncle promises to care for her chickens while she is gone, she can head back home with a smile on her face. Theillustrations are absolutely beautiful and bright. The tale Diakite tells is endearing and fascinating as she shares the wonder and traditions of Mali. This book should be thoroughly enjoyed. 2006, Scholastic Press, Ages 7 to 9.
—Emily Cook
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-This story recounts a child's visit to Mali, where she loses her tooth. After she hides it under a calabash, she waits for the African Tooth Fairy to replace it with a chicken. When her patience runs out and she returns to the gourd to retrieve her tooth, a chicken and a rooster emerge. She is delighted. The strength and enduring warmth of her African extended family emerge fully through thoughtful detail. Grandma N'na gives her a blessing each morning: "May you rise high with strength and knowledge." When the child returns home to Oregon, Uncle Madou volunteers to take care of the chickens until her return. The vivid ceramic-tile illustrations expand the text, revealing a range of animals, houses, and greenery. At the end are the words to Grandma's "Good Night Song," the recipe for African Onion Sauce, and a glossary of Bambara words, all of which add to the authentic feel of the story. In his illustrator's note, Baba Diakit states, "Storytelling is a gift to me from my elders and I simply wanted to pass this gift along to my children." He has succeeded, as his artistry supports his daughter's storytelling beautifully.-Alexa L. Sandman, Kent State University, OH Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Penda, the author, and Amina, the subject of her older sister's book, are the children of the inventive Malian author/illustrator who has shared his culture through retellings of traditional folktales and creative ceramic-tile illustrations with distinctive borders. Now the father uses his art detailing village life in Mali to illustrate a story written by his elder daughter when she was eight. Instead of getting money from the Tooth Fairy, children in Mali get a chicken. Born in Portland, Ore., Amina loses her tooth on a vacation trip to Mali and gets two chickens, a hen and a rooster. When they begin to lay eggs, she hopes that she will see the baby chicks before she has to return home. Diakite includes a recipe for Malian onion sauce, mentioned in the text, a glossary and a goodnight song in Bambara, one of the languages used in Mali. The young author's descriptions offer an amusing introduction to one African country, and an excellent way to encourage children to start writing their own family stories. (Picture book. 5-8)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439662260
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/1/2006
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 620L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 11.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 13, 2009

    I Lost My Tooth In Africa

    Amina is taking a trip to Mali Africa. It is where her father's family resides. She is super excited, especially since her tooth is loose! Her father informs her that in Africa when someone loses a tooth, the African tooth fairy will bring you a chicken. When she arrives in Mali, all of her family greets her. They stay in a compound, where donkeys, goats, and chickens roam. She eats some meat, hoping that her tooth will come out. Finally the next day, when Amina is brushing her teeth at a papaya tree, her tooth comes out. She is so thrilled. Amina plays some African games with her cousins and even takes a nap, waiting for her chicken to come. Just as Amina is beginning to give up on the African tooth fairy, two chickens pop out of a nearby bush. Amina grows excited, especially when she finds eggs in the hen's nest. Amina's family helps her build a coop for the chickens to stay in. Problems begin brewing when a nearby pheasant is found walking near the coop. Internal problems also take place when Amina's uncle tells her that it takes approximately 21 days for eggs to hatch.
    I Lost My Tooth in Africa is a great read for children in early elementary, during the time when "tooth loosing" is common. After reading this book, children will have good insight as to what life is like in Mali, Africa. At the end of the book, a glossary, African song, and an authentic recipe is provided for readers. The author was only 8 years old when she wrote this book. Her father illustrated. If you are looking for a book full of adventure, take a journey through Amina's shoes, and read I Lost My Tooth in Africa.

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  • Posted November 18, 2008

    I Lost My Tooth in Africa

    I Lost My Tooth in Africa by Penda Diakité is a great story for children. Amina tells of her time spent in Africa on a family visit. She has a loose tooth and her father tells her that if she loses her tooth in Africa she will get a chicken from the African Tooth Fairy. So she tries her hardest to lose this tooth, and then one day it finally comes out. She does not end up getting her chicken until the very last day, but the anticipation makes it very exciting. This book is great for young children because they can relate to Amina and I feel that the loss of a tooth would excite them and they would be able to relate to this as well. The book is also multicultural and would give the students a good insight into some of the African culture.

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