I Love You, Little One by Nancy Tafuri, Board Book | Barnes & Noble
I Love You, Little One
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I Love You, Little One

4.5 11
by Nancy Tafuri
     
 

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In this story about six animal babies and one special child, Nancy Tafuri's lyrical text and distinctive artwork beautifully express the deep and lasting love all parents feel for their little ones. Full color. 32 pp. Ages 3-7. Pub: 3/98.

Overview

In this story about six animal babies and one special child, Nancy Tafuri's lyrical text and distinctive artwork beautifully express the deep and lasting love all parents feel for their little ones. Full color. 32 pp. Ages 3-7. Pub: 3/98.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Reviews for I Love You, Little One hardcover:

Booklist: "Tafuri has created a rockabye picture book that sings. ... In the realm of bedtime cozies, this one stands out for its simplicity without mawkishness and the purity of its rhythms."

School Library Journal: "The lyrical text is spare and patterned, and the repeated phrases invite participation. ... The colors are muted as befits the quiet story, and the many strokes depicting animal feathers and fur are striking. ... Perfect for bedtime sharing."

Publisher's Weekly: "A soothing and sturdy choice."

Horn Book: "Reassuring ... endearing."

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this tender bedtime book, seven young creatures ask in turn a single, important question: "Do you love me, Mama?" The answer in each case is the same: "forever and ever and always," but it is preceded by different, lyrical similes. Mama Rabbit loves her baby "as the earth loves you, warm and snug around you, giving you a warm place to sleep"; Mama Mouse loves her child "as the wild rye loves you, gently swaying above you, giving you food and cover from harm." As the characters speak, the pictures quietly show the progression of the sun and moon to indicate the passage of time from midmorning to evening. The book's oversized pages seem to enfold the reader like a hug, and the full-bleed watercolor-and-ink illustrations are sumptuously yet tidily rendered, bringing to life the lushness of the woodland setting while maintaining a comforting sense of order. So stunningly detailed are Tafuri's (Have You Seen My Duckling?) dusky, downy-coated animals that the pink-skinned human mother and genderless child shown on the final spread seem almost bland in comparison. A compositional strategy gently underlines the point of the narrative: the spreads in which the little ones ask their anxious question are framed as medium or long shots, while the mothers make their reassuring reply in snuggly close-ups. A soothing and sturdy choice. Ages 3-7. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Jessy Deutsch
This is one that parents will love to read as much as children will enjoy listening to its soothing message and looking at its peaceful images. This sprawling watercolor book is too big for the littlest ones to hold, but it simply and beautifully captures the universal, soulful love of parent and child, conveying the kind of security that every child yearns for, and also building the sense of community of all living things. It's hard to imagine a better book for bedtime - this one seems destined for a place next to "Goodnight Moon" and other classic shared stories.
Children's Literature
True to the original, Tafuri's soft illustrations in this board book adaptation show a variety of familiar animals with their offspring. Each asks Mama "Do you love me" and the mother replies with the appropriate reassurances. At the end, a human child asks the same question and receives a loving response, "I love you as the stars love you, forever, and ever, and always." A good choice for bedtime reading or anytime a bit of calm may be needed. Reminiscent of Guess How Much I Love You and others. 2000, Scholastic,
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1Over the course of a day, several baby animals ask their mothers whether they love them. In each instance, the parent compares her love to the protective, life-giving environment in which the creature lives: "I love you as the pond loves you, wide and calm beneath you, giving you food and places to swim," says Mama duck. Finally, a human child asks the same question and is assured of a love that is as constant as the stars, "Forever, and ever, and always." The lyrical text is spare and patterned, and the repeated phrases invite participation. The illustrations, all double-page spreads done in watercolor, ink, and colored pencils, are signature Tafurilarge and uncluttered. The extra-wide book design enables the illustrator to present a panoramic view of each animal's habitat before zooming in on a close-up of parent and child in the following spread. The colors are muted as befits the quiet story, and the many strokes depicting animal feathers and fur are striking. While this is not a new subject for picture books, youngsters need many assurances of parental love. This one is perfect for bedtime sharing.Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community-Technical College, CT
Kirkus Reviews
Six beautiful mother-and-baby animal pairs—some rendered larger than life size—and one human mother and child play variations on the theme "I will always love you." In response to the question, "Do you love me, Mama?" asked by each little one, the mothers reply, "Yes, little one . . . forever and ever and always." In each instance, a parallel is drawn between the mother's love and the nurturing, protecting environment that is the animal's home. The human mother, however, says, "I love you as the stars love you, constant and bright above you, giving you joy and peace and wonder." Even very young children will know that the notion of stars loving anyone is a bit of a stretch, but will respond to the poetry of it, anyway. Tafuri's trademark watercolor- and-pencil illustrations, with every hair and feather and blade of grass meticulously stroked in, are just as lovely here as in What the Sun Sees, What the Moon Sees (1997) and show the world as the same reassuring, benevolent place. A book for quiet times, for sharing one-on-one. (Picture book. 2-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439137461
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/2000
Edition description:
Board
Pages:
15
Sales rank:
208,592
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 5.80(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Nancy Tafuri has been illustrating books for children since the late 1970s. Whether providing pictures for other authors, such as Charlotte Pomerantz and Mirra Ginsburg, or creating her own works, she is praised by critics for her simple yet imaginative art. If I Had a Paka: Poems in Eleven Languages, which Tafuri illustrated for Pomerantz, was selected as a Jane Addams honor book; Tafuri’s own Have You Seen My Duckling? was a Caldecott Honor Book.

Tafuri was born on November 14, 1946, in Brooklyn, New York. For the first ten years of her life she was an only child and says that this helped her learn to entertain herself with stories and art.

Tafuri entered the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 1964. Her first job was as an assistant art director for the publishing firm Simon & Schuster. She left two years later and married Thomas Tafuri, a fellow student at the School of Visual Arts.

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