I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror

I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror

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by Pierre Seel
     
 

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On a fateful day in May 1941, in Nazi-occupied Strasbourg, seventeen-year- old Pierre Seel was summoned by the Gestapo. This was the beginning of his journey through the horrors of a concentration camp.

For nearly forty years, Seel kept this secret in order to hide his homosexuality. Eventually he decided to speak out, bearing witness to an aspect of the

Overview


On a fateful day in May 1941, in Nazi-occupied Strasbourg, seventeen-year- old Pierre Seel was summoned by the Gestapo. This was the beginning of his journey through the horrors of a concentration camp.

For nearly forty years, Seel kept this secret in order to hide his homosexuality. Eventually he decided to speak out, bearing witness to an aspect of the Holocaust rarely seen. This edition, with a new foreword from gay-literature historian Gregory Woods, is an extraordinary firsthand account of the Nazi roundup and the deportation of homosexuals.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
After years of anguished silence, French-born Seel came out of the closet in 1981 at the age of 58 to bear witness to the Nazi deportation of homosexuals during WWII. In this brief, powerful memoir, he recalls the details of his arrest and torture by the Gestapo and his horrific experiences at a concentration camp in Alsace, where homosexuals were the most despised of prisoners. Inexplicably released in 1941, he was drafted into the German army, saw action on various fronts and managed to survive the war. Convinced by a priest that he was in a state of mortal sin, Seel set out to eradicate his homosexuality, keeping silent for years about his ``pink triangle'' past. But in 1981, outraged by a prominent bishop's characterization of homosexuals as ``sick,'' he became inspired with a sense of obligation to obtain recognition for what had happened to some 350,000 homosexuals during the war, and his public statements became a cause clbre in France. Seel remains active at 72 in his personal crusade, publicly airing the long-overlooked tragedy of the homosexual holocaust. His account of his suffering and his plea for justice are heartrending in their dignified restraint. Illustrations. (Aug.)
Library Journal
Seel was abducted by the Germans from his home in Alsace, France, because his name appeared on a police list of suspected homosexuals. He was then subjected to ghastly torture, later conscripted into the German army, and eventually taken prisoner by the Russians. His testimony and plight do not end there. After years of a difficult marriage and attempts to overcome his shame, he now seeks the same recognition other victims of the Nazis receive from the French government. This harrowing tale may be overwhelming for some, but it gives new depth to human witness of the most horrific act of the century. Though there is an enormous Holocaust literature, relatively little deals with the Nazi internment of gays. A notable exception is Heinz Heger's The Men with the Pink Triangle (Alyson Books, 1994. 2d ed.). For public libraries.-David Azzolina, Univ. of Pennsylvania Libs., Philadelphia

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465018482
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
04/26/2011
Edition description:
First Trade Paper Edition
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
750,245
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.56(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

Susan Zuccotti
"A moving and fascinating testimony."

Meet the Author


Pierre Seel (1923-2005) wrote Moi, Pierre Seel, déporté homosexuel in 1994. In 2008, the municipality of Toulouse, France, renamed a street in honor of Pierre Seel.

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I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Wally11 More than 1 year ago
Sad and true. Writing is good. Facts are all too common with the Holocaust, regardless of gay or straight.