I Remember Papa

I Remember Papa

by Helen Ketteman
     
 

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Every weekend, when the sun rises, Audie wakes up to help his father with the farm work. And every weekend Audie gets paid a quarter. Someday, he'll use the money to see a baseball game or buy a glove. Then one Saturday, Audie and his father go on a train trip to the city. Audie can't believe it. He is filled with anticipation. Will all of his baseball dreams come…  See more details below

Overview

Every weekend, when the sun rises, Audie wakes up to help his father with the farm work. And every weekend Audie gets paid a quarter. Someday, he'll use the money to see a baseball game or buy a glove. Then one Saturday, Audie and his father go on a train trip to the city. Audie can't believe it. He is filled with anticipation. Will all of his baseball dreams come true?

"The center of the story is the hallowed relationship between father and son in a by gone era, fondly remembered."
-Kirkus Reviews

"Baseball fans will appreciate this rich family story."
-Booklist

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Audie works hard on the farm, and his dad gives him a quarter every weekend which he saves. He dreams of buying a baseball glove, but times are hard and money is scarce. Then one morning his father announces that they are going into the city because he needs new work boots. It also means a train ride and papa is taking him to a professional baseball game. Audie remembers his savings and he puts the money into an envelope and sticks it in his pocket. In the city, Audie spies a baseball glove, papa finds a pair of workboots, and asks that they be held until after the game. The excitement of the day grows, but then to his horror Audie discovers that his money is missing. Dreams of a baseball glove vanish, but papa still makes the day special. It is a heartwarming father-son story with warm and soft gouache illustrations that are a perfect match.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1A warm story set in the past. A boy earns a quarter every weekend for getting up early and helping his father on their farm. He keeps the money in a cigar box and saves it to buy a baseball glove. When he and his dad take the train to town to buy new boots, he takes his savings just in case he sees a glove he can afford. They see one in the window of a sporting-goods store that has not yet opened for the day, and then go to a Cincinnati Reds game, where the boy loses the envelope containing his money. His dad then spends his boot money on the glove, explaining that his old boots can be glued to last a while longer. The story is told in the past tense from the boy's point of view, and is warm without being treacly. The realistic, gouache illustrations are filled with natural light and the slow motion of a fond memory, with a nostalgic tone similar to some of the scenes in the baseball movie The Natural.Christine A. Moesch, Buffalo & Erie County Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
From Ketteman (Heat Wave, 1998, etc.), a sentimental reminiscence about a Saturday train trip to the ball game and a life lesson gained from a childhood loss. A young boy accompanies his father to Cincinnati, hoping to buy a baseball glove, his savings tucked securely inside his pocket. Needless to say, he loses the money and fears he won't be able to buy the mitt. His father, instead of buying much-needed work boots, comes through with the money, and the child is determined to pay back every penny. The grainy gouache paintings have the varnished look of an aging, yellowed photograph, appropriately nostalgic. While the plot is constructed around a baseball mitt, the theme at the center of the story is the hallowed relationship between father and son in a bygone era, fondly remembered. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803718494
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/28/1998
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.78(w) x 10.78(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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