I Represent Sean Rosen

I Represent Sean Rosen

4.3 3
by Jeff Baron
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Sean Rosen makes funny videos you can watch online. He also has ideas for movies, TV shows, and games that he knows are good enough to be produced by the biggest studios in Hollywood. The only problem is, he's a kid. And he's busy with school. And he lives far from Los Angeles or New York City. But Sean does have a laptop and a phone, and he's smart. He

Overview

Sean Rosen makes funny videos you can watch online. He also has ideas for movies, TV shows, and games that he knows are good enough to be produced by the biggest studios in Hollywood. The only problem is, he's a kid. And he's busy with school. And he lives far from Los Angeles or New York City. But Sean does have a laptop and a phone, and he's smart. He's about to have the ride of a lifetime as he discovers the ins and outs—and dos and don'ts—of becoming one of the youngest movie moguls the world's ever known.

An inventive, original, and hilarious novel that will leave fans of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Carl Hiaasen, and Louis Sachar eager for Sean's next adventure.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sean Rosen has an idea. A big one that he says "will affect TV, theater, games, and especially movies." But breaking into the entertainment biz isn't easy for a 13-year-old, even one who subscribes to the Hollywood Reporter. Before reaching out to the (unnamed) "huge company" he hopes to work with, Sean attempts a trial run with his second-choice company. After creating a fictitious manager, Dan Welch, to help get his foot in the door, Sean gets an offer—not for his big, secret idea (readers don't even learn what it is), but for a movie idea. Throughout, debut author Baron realistically incorporates technology into the story—Sean (as Dan) arranges a Skype meeting with the entertainment exec; he also produces his own podcasts—and Sean's email exchanges with various professionals are dead-on. Because Sean is keeping so many secrets from his family, friends, and others, the story relies heavily on his long internal monologues, which can become tiring. But readers who share Sean's Hollywood ambitions will find his experiences just as eye-opening as he does. Ages 10–up. Agent: Julie Just, Janklow & Nesbit. (Mar.)
Ned Vizzini
"I Represent Sean Rosen is the best book I’ve read in a while. Equal parts Hollywood satire, Louis Sachar–style deadpan fable, and old-fashioned tale of American gumption, it introduces us to a character who is surprising . . . and quietly heroic. . . . I happily represent Sean Rosen."
Children's Literature - Bonita Herold
Sean Rosen has an excellent idea that will get him into the entertainment business—at least, he has convinced himself of that and he can be pretty persuasive. He does not want to say what it is because it is so good that it might get stolen. Instead of taking it to the entertainment company he really respects, he chooses a lesser known company, only to find out very quickly that they are not interested in dealing with a thirteen-year-old without an agent. When Sean tries to find one, none of them wants to take on a young teen either. Finally, he decides that he will become his own manager, because managers do not seem to have websites; no one would be the wiser. So he invents Dan Welch, based on a foray into the refrigerator (Dan for Dannon and Welch for the grape juice). Dan writes a very convincing email on Sean's behalf and sends it off, only to hook up with a company that wants to talk to him immediately. That is a little difficult since Dan is really Sean, and they will recognize a child's voice—plus he does not actually have the movie idea that he told them he had; his original idea concerned something else altogether. At any rate, Sean takes the opportunity to explain why Dan cannot show, but he will arrange a Skype meeting. Things snowball from there, getting funnier and funnier. While written for a middle grade audience, the uniquely humorous voice of Sean Rosen will appeal to older readers as well. Baron undeniably displays a keen sense of humor not to be missed. Reviewer: Bonita Herold
Kirkus Reviews
Thirteen-year-old Sean has an innovative concept that he believes will transform the entertainment industry. Sean's goal is to present his concept to a major entertainment company. Baron's wryly humorous tale depicts how the determined eighth-grader approaches this endeavor, reviewing the thicket of hurdles facing industry newcomers. When Sean discovers that major entertainment companies are nearly inaccessible to those without representation by either an agent or manager, he is undeterred. Instead, he becomes embroiled in a comical, although improbable, series of events in which he masquerades as his own manager. To further complicate matters, another prestigious entertainment company responds to Sean's inquiry and expresses interest in his impromptu movie idea. Suddenly, Sean must deal with industry executives and bewildering legal contracts. Through Sean's misadventures, Baron examines such issues as navigating the complex world of movie screenwriting and maintaining artistic integrity. He deftly juxtaposes these scenarios with Sean's ordinary life. Interspersed throughout the tale, Sean's reflections and witty observations regarding middle school life and friendship add a pragmatic yet humorous note. An engaging and educational primer on the workings of the movie industry. (Fiction. 10-14)
Lincoln Peirce
“Sean Rosen is my hero!”
-- Ned Vizzini
“I Represent Sean Rosen is the best book I’ve read in a while. Equal parts Hollywood satire, Louis Sachar–style deadpan fable, and old-fashioned tale of American gumption, it introduces us to a character who is surprising . . . and quietly heroic. . . . I happily represent Sean Rosen.”
Robert Lipsyte
“Smart, funny, and fresh. I want Sean Rosen to represent me.”
Rich Cohen
“Wonderful, fast, vivid, funny. I read it with my son, and we [fought] over who would read and who would listen. I recommend it to any kid who plans to grow up and face the world of sharks and minnows, and any parent who wants a little reprieve from same.”
— Ned Vizzini
“I Represent Sean Rosen is the best book I’ve read in a while. Equal parts Hollywood satire, Louis Sachar–style deadpan fable, and old-fashioned tale of American gumption, it introduces us to a character who is surprising . . . and quietly heroic. . . . I happily represent Sean Rosen.”
Booklist
“Burning with a big idea that he is convinced will revolutionize the entertainment industry, Sean recounts his improbable success story in such a glib mix of moves and countermoves that readers will be swept along in the giddy rush.”
Everyday E-books
“Baron’s fast-paced writing manages to capture not only a brilliant voice but also to convey the humor, affection, and frustration a smart and funny thirteen-year-old has for the life around him in a book that will delight any teen who dares to dream big.”
Library Media Connection
“Sean Rosen is a fascinating character, and readers will enjoy his farcical adventures. Told through letters, emails, texts, and prose, it appeals to today’s tech-savvy teens and tweens.”
School Library Journal
Gr 6–8—Sean Rosen has an idea for a movie, one that he's certain is worth a lot of money. Unfortunately, he can't get it sold because he needs an agent or a manager. Since nobody wants to represent a 13-year-old boy, he moves to plan B: he invents Dan Welch to represent him. When the vice president of an entertainment company responds to Dan's email about his client, Sean must keep the myth alive while struggling with the decision to accept the offer he has received. In this hilarious debut novel, Baron gives readers interesting insight into the creative process. The ending, though a bit of a surprise, brings the story to a logical and perfect conclusion, but one gets the feeling that this may not be the last time readers hear from Sean Rosen. Fans of Jeff Kinney's "Wimpy Kid" (Abrams) and Carl Hiaasen's books will not be disappointed.—Wayne R. Cherry, Jr., First Baptist Academy Library, Houston, TX

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062187475
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/19/2013
Pages:
345
Sales rank:
736,569
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.40(d)
Lexile:
660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Related Subjects

What People are saying about this

Ned Vizzini
“I Represent Sean Rosen is the best book I’ve read in a while. Equal parts Hollywood satire, Louis Sacharstyle deadpan fable, and old-fashioned tale of American gumption, it introduces us to a character who is surprising . . . and quietly heroic. . . . I happily represent Sean Rosen.”

Meet the Author

Jeff Baron wrote for prime-time series on all of the major TV networks plus multiple projects for Nickelodeon. His award-winning plays have been produced in forty-three countries. He lives in New York City.

Sean Rosen has produced many videos, which can be seen on his YouTube channel and at www.seanrosen.com. Sean doesn't want you to know where he lives. You'll know why when you read the book.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

I Represent Sean Rosen 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved reading I Represent Sean Rosen. It is a funny, smart and entertaining book that makes you think about how 12-year old kids think, feel and act. It brings back some childhood memories, but most of all makes you see the world through the eyes of the main character, a kid, who solves issues from a practical, yet very intelligent point of view, never letting go of his principles and ethics. A lesson for us adults.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book for both teens and adults.  I have a 13 year-old son, and the author has skillfully captured the world-view of a precocious but down-to-earth teenage boy.  His take on the world is funny, charming, touching and illuminating.  Hopefully it will give teens a sense of empowerment and they will feel encouraged by Sean's story to value and pursue their dreams. LisaLinden
DudleyS More than 1 year ago
From an 11 year old boy - "This book was very interesteing and had me on the edge of my seat."