I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala / Edition 1

I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala / Edition 1

4.4 7
by Rigoberta Menchu
     
 

ISBN-10: 0860917886

ISBN-13: 9780860917885

Pub. Date: 07/28/1985

Publisher: Verso Books

"Now a global bestseller, the remarkable life of Rigoberta Menchu, a Guatemalan peasant woman, reflects on the experiences common to many Indian communities in Latin America. Menchu suffered gross injustice and hardship in her early life: her brother, father and mother were murdered by the Guatemalan military. She learned Spanish and turned to catechistic work

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Overview

"Now a global bestseller, the remarkable life of Rigoberta Menchu, a Guatemalan peasant woman, reflects on the experiences common to many Indian communities in Latin America. Menchu suffered gross injustice and hardship in her early life: her brother, father and mother were murdered by the Guatemalan military. She learned Spanish and turned to catechistic work as an expression of political revolt as well as religious commitment. Menchu vividly conveys the traditional beliefs of her community and her personal response to feminist and socialist ideas." Above all, these pages are illuminated by the enduring courage and passionate sense of justice of an extraordinary woman. This new edition includes a further reading section, addressing the widespread discussions and debates that followed the original publication of I, Rigoberta Menchu.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780860917885
Publisher:
Verso Books
Publication date:
07/28/1985
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
252
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

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I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rigoberta Menchu Gives a first hand account of her life as a Mayan woman in a world of the violence of globialization and flawed political idealogy. I read this book before traveling to Guatemala to visit with many native groups who have similar stories. Rigoberta's story forces us to look at how we, as members of the Western world, participte in the suffering of others. Marxism is not the motivation of this book as has been alleged. Disregard for the value of humanity and its implications are.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
After readind A kirk's review of 1999, I can only conclude that he had obviously not read enough, had clearly missed the point, and is in fact, as we say in scotland, a numptey.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i think the book 'I Rigobert Menchu' is the harsh reality of today's society. it's absolute rubbish that some people think that the story is all lies. why would someone make something like that up? i think it is a fantastic book and recommend anyone to read it because it will open up your eyes to the reality of poverty and torture so many people around the world are facing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an easy to read, extremely informative story about indigenous life in Guatemala. I used this book in my term paper, along with Victor Perera's 'Unfinished Conquest', and received an A! It is also used as a text book in college because it is so highly acclaimed. I have spent time in a 3rd world country and this book tells the truth about the harsh living conditions. (P.S. Rigoberta Menchu won the Nobel Peace Prize; gotta read to find out why!)
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read this book in anticipation of a course I shall take next semester. The book was very well written and went through the supposed life of Rigoberta, the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize winner. The book has since been proven to be a fraud and the author and transcripter have been identified as Marxist, and suposedly the book was crafted to fit the marxist idea of the suppressed working class. I can honestly see that at various points in the book. Before I researched her life, I was rather surprised how much her autobiography really did remind me of Marx's writing, so it was not much of a shock to me. I don't think this book can be discarded though because of its fiction-ish qualities. Its brilliant. If you think about it..someone fabricated this.. made many people believe it.. and got a Nobel Peace Prize in the process! Ha! On a more serious note.. although it was fiction, a lot of the stories must have originated from somewhere, I find it very difficult to believe that the Natives of Guatemala are living the good life. The book makes us aware of a society which reminds me of the United States 150 years ago, except its going on NOW! thats sad.. So okay.. thats my review.. once i discuss it in class I'll probably gain greater insights.. but please don't discard this from any reading list because of its fiction qualities!