I Say a Little Prayer [NOOK Book]

Overview

A USA Today, New York Times, Washington Post BestsellerChauncey Greer, the suave and successful owner of the Cute Boy Greeting Card Company, never wants for the attention of guys just as hot as he is. After a couple of bad dates Chauncey finds himself in church, where the minister’s message inspires him to return to the singing career he had launched as a teenager. Things heat up when Chauncey’s rediscovered singing talent lands him in the middle of a protest over homophobia in the black church, and Chauncey’s ...
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I Say a Little Prayer

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Overview

A USA Today, New York Times, Washington Post BestsellerChauncey Greer, the suave and successful owner of the Cute Boy Greeting Card Company, never wants for the attention of guys just as hot as he is. After a couple of bad dates Chauncey finds himself in church, where the minister’s message inspires him to return to the singing career he had launched as a teenager. Things heat up when Chauncey’s rediscovered singing talent lands him in the middle of a protest over homophobia in the black church, and Chauncey’s old singing partner–and former lover–makes a dramatic and unexpected entrance.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Harris takes a sympathetic look at the difficulty of reconciling homosexuality and faith in the black church in his lively ninth novel. Thirty-eight-year old Chauncey Greer classifies his heft sexual appetite as basically bi with a gay leaning; but also needs a personal relationship with God. Once a member of a boy band called Reunion (his deeply felt love affair with fellow bandmate Sweet D precipitated its breakup), Chauncey now owns a successful Atlanta-based greeting card company. Chauncey is a regular at the progressive Abundant Joy Baptist Church, where Pastor Kenneth s inspired preaching reignites his dreams of a singing career. After Chauncey sings a soul-stirring solo at church, the pastor invites him to perform at an upcoming revival led by the fundamentalist Bishop Upchurch and his vindictive wife Grayson. But Chauncey s friends plan to boycott the revival because of the Upchurches gay-bashing, and Chauncey must decide between his passion for singing and his personal identity a decision complicated by the reappearance of a figure from his past. Though supporting characters remain flat, Harris (A Love of My Own) illuminates a divide in the black church while exploring the universal theme of broken love. (May) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
On the brink, Chauncey returns to church and is inspired to resume his music career-which leads straight to thoughts of the man who inspired his old songs. Then he discovers that the forthcoming revival meeting is turning into an antigay rally. With a national tour. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A gay Atlanta businessman struggles to make peace with his faith and sexuality when his first love unexpectedly reappears. With a successful greeting-card company, chic apartment and no shortage of handsome male admirers, Chauncey Greer has much to be thankful for. And he shows his gratitude every Sunday by attending services at Abundant Joy, a moderately sized church where he feels accepted, "measured by the love I have in my heart and not the lust I have in my head." It is during one rousing service that he finds himself haunted by his past, and the singing career he gave up far too soon. As a teenage member of R&B boy band Reunion, Chauncey briefly tasted fame, until his close relationship with bandmate Sweet D tore the group apart. Ready for a comeback, Chauncey is understandably excited when his pastor taps him to sing at a revival headlined by up-and-coming minister and senatorial candidate Bishop Damien Upchurch. His joy turns to dismay when he finds out that the young bishop is none other than Sweet D, all grown up and running on a conservative-and rabidly anti-gay-platform. Chauncey is then torn between outing the hypocritical preacher and keeping his private life private. To add to this stress, Chauncey is menaced by a studly wannabe-be blackmailer and confronted by Damien's nasty shrew of a wife, Grayson, who wants to make sure that nothing stands in the way of her Election Day plans. Harris's addictive latest (A Love of My Own, 2003, etc.) manages to capture both the erotic heat and spiritual fervor of Chauncey's world, as the man is forced to face the choices he has made, and the fact that he has been unable to enjoy a committed relationship since parting with Sweet D. Thestory ends somewhat quickly with a silly soap opera twist that does little to cloud its inspiring message of spiritual love and inclusion. Moving and honest exploration of sex, sin and redemption.
From the Publisher
“Vintage Harris...A story filled with sex, humor and plenty of plot twists.”—Ebony“From naked cocktail parties to religious conundrums, the “Godfather of the Down Low” gives you just the right amount of raunchiness and redemption in his latest.” —Upscale “Heartfelt.” —Essence“Harris’s addictive latest...capture[s] both the erotic heat and spiritual fervor of Chauncey’s world....[A] moving and honest exploration of sex, sin, and redemption.” —Kirkus“What’s got audiences hooked? Harris’s unique spin on the ever-fascinating topics of identity, class, intimacy, sexuality, and friendship.” —Vibe“Thank God for E. Lynn Harris.” —Philadelphia Inquirer“The man who helped put the down low on the cultural map returns with another sexy page-turner.” —Out
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307387585
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/21/2007
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 330,284
  • File size: 328 KB

Meet the Author

E. Lynn Harris
E. Lynn Harris was born in Flint, Michigan and raised, along with three sisters, in Little Rock, Arkansas. Harris sold computers for IBM, Hewlett-Packard, and AT&T for 13 years while living in Dallas, Washington, D.C. and Atlanta. He finally quit his sales job to write his first novel, Invisible Life, and, failing to find a publisher, he published it himself in 1991 before he was "discovered" by Anchor Books. Anchor published Invisible Life as a trade paperback in 1994. Invisible Life was followed by Just As I Am (1994), And This Too Shall Pass (1996), If This World Were Mine (1997), and Abide With Me (1999), all published by Doubleday. Harris's sixth novel, Not A Day Goes By (July 2000) debuted at #2 on the New York Times bestseller list. His seventh novel, Any Way the Wind Blows (July 2001), also debuted at #2 on the New York Times bestseller list. His most recent novel, A Love of My Own (July 2002), was a national bestseller as well. What Becomes Of The Brokenhearted (July 2003), Harris's first non fiction work, debuted at #6 on the New York Times bestseller list making E. Lynn the first African American male to appear on both the fiction and non-fiction lists. Currently, there are over three million copies of Harris's novels in print. For more: elynnharris.com

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Biography

Jackie Collins has kept the literary romance world well stocked with claws-out, upper-crust melodramas. But until E. Lynn Harris came along, the genre lacked a little ... diversity. Harris brought diversity and then some, with his now-trademark "buppie" characters, questions about sexuality, and hopelessly (but deliciously) complicated relationships.

Written from both male and female points of view and featuring recurring characters, Harris's books can be read as a veritable soap opera. The cycle begins with Invisible Life, the story of Raymond Winston Tyler Jr. -- a character Harris has acknowledged bears many similarities to himself. Raymond grapples with his sexuality, developing a relationship with a man he meets in law school and jeopardizing one with his girlfriend. His coming-of-age continues over the next two novels in the trilogy, Just As I Am and Abide with Me, as he struggles with losses of friends to AIDS, the ending of a relationship with an actress, and the beginning of a new one with a man.

Another recurring Harris character, Basil Henderson, is the man readers love to hate. An arrogant, badass football player-turned-sports agent, Basil beds both women and men until he meets up with his female (and later, male) counterparts. His story is mainly told in Not a Day Goes By and Any Way the Wind Blows.

It's true that in the Basil Henderson books, Harris is taking a saucy cue or two from his female romance novel predecessors; but the author claims to be more heavily influenced by writers such as Maya Angelou and Terry McMillan, and it would be misleading to pigeonhole his books as purely guilty pleasures. Particularly in his earlier books, Harris brought to a mainstream readership the issues that many gay and bisexual men face, and added a new voice to the portrayal of black, upwardly mobile characters. And in books such as If This World Were Mine and the young adult novel Diaries of a Light-Skinned Colored Boy, he has addressed issues of race and self-realization.

Given his themes, it may seem surprising that the majority of Harris's readers are straight women; but it's also a testament to his ability to write about love and self-discovery with humor, not to mention a little steaminess.

Good To Know

Harris worked as a salesman for IBM, and earned a following by self-publishing Invisible Life before getting a book deal.

He was tapped to write the screenplay for an update of the 1976 movie Sparkle, to be produced by Whitney Houston's production company. But with the death of Aaliyah, who was attached to star, the project's future is uncertain.

He lived most of his adult life in Chicago, Illinois.

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    1. Hometown:
      Chicago, Illinois
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 20, 1955
    2. Place of Birth:
      Flint, Michigan
    1. Date of Death:
      July 23, 2009
    2. Place of Death:
      Los Angeles, California

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE

Oh, hell naw were the only three words that came to mind, and I found myself saying them out loud.

“Oh, hell naw,” I said.

“Hold up,” Jayshawn whispered as he held his finger to his lips.

“Oh, hell naw,” I repeated.

He got up from the bed with his cell phone glued to his ear and walked into my bathroom. I could hear him say­ing, “I’m sorry, babygirl, I don’t like it when you get upset like this. Give me five minutes and I’ll call you back.”

I sat up in my king-size sleigh bed and wondered how I got myself into situations like this. I had just enjoyed a quiet evening with great Chinese takeout from my favorite restaurant, P. F. Chang’s, a bottle of Merlot, a blunt, and ended the evening with head-banging sex. I’d fallen asleep wrapped up with a handsome redbone PTB (pretty tall brother) and was having sweet dreams until they were inter­rupted by the sound of his cell phone.

I ignored the first call, and didn’t mind when Jayshawn jumped out of bed and took the call in the adjacent bath­room. But then it happened again, and again. Every time I tried to go back to sleep, that fucking cell phone, playing rap music like we were in a club, woke me up. I’d had enough of this shit. I was even willing to give up the promised wake-up sex session with Jayshawn. It served me right for dealing with another so-called DL brother like Jayshawn. That nigga just wasn’t in the closet, he was the closet–all three walls and the double-lock door, too. But what choice did I have, since I didn’t date sissies or men who defined themselves strictly by their sexuality.

“I’m sorry, Chaunce,” Jayshawn said as he walked back into the bedroom, completely nude with a semi-erect penis swinging from side to side.

“What’s going on?” I demanded. It was going to take more than a fat dick to calm me down.

“My girl, you know she be bugging,” he said.

“About what?”

“Thinks I am up here cheating with another girl,” he said as he sat at the edge of the bed and turned toward me as if he was trying to gauge my anger.

“I thought you told her you were working.”
“I did, but you know bitches–they always think they know something. Trying to catch a nigga in some shit,” he said. “I think I need to catch the first flight out. I think there’s one at seven A.M.”

I looked at the digital clock on my DVD player and the time flashed 4:12 A.M. I turned back to Jayshawn and was getting ready to tell him that he needed to catch a taxi because I was not about to get out of my bed at this hour and take his tired ass to the airport, when the damn cell phone rang again!

“Don’t answer that,” I demanded, this time not trying to keep the anger out of my voice.

“I got to, Chauncey,” he said. “I’ll be downstairs trying to get her to chill.”

“Listen, Jayshawn, you need to leave. I don’t care where you go, but you need to get your ass up outta here. I’m going to church in a few hours, and I need some sleep.” I tossed the covers to the floor and got up to take a leak, shaking my head in disgust.

While I was in the bathroom, I thought about all the conversations and e-mails that had led to this evening. Sev­eral years ago, I met Jayshawn as I was walking through the lobby of the Ritz-Carlton in Washington, D.C. I was there on a business trip and Jayshawn was having a drink in the bar. We gave each other the look, and before you could say, “Brothers gonna work it out,” we had exchanged business cards. A couple of days later, I got an e-mail from Jayshawn with a nude picture attached. From that moment, it was on. We agreed to drive and meet each other halfway, which meant I had to drive from Atlanta to Raleigh, North Carolina.

I liked Jayshawn Ward because he was handsome, smart, and like me he wasn’t a card-carrying member of the gay community. He was honest, telling me that he was the father of a six-year-old boy and a two-year-old girl. Jayshawn told me he was no longer involved with his baby’s mama but had lady friends he dated occasionally. Neither one of us was looking for a relationship, or as I call it, a relation-shit; we both just wanted some regular hookup sex with another cool brother.

Everything was fine for about two years. We would get together every two months, and the sex was off the chain. Jayshawn knew how to use every part of his six-foot-five-inch frame–he was a former college basketball player who still knew how to dunk.

Last year Jayshawn called me and told me he’d met a special young lady, and he wanted to pursue a relationship with her. He told me we had to end our sessions. I don’t know why, even though it was just sex, I was a little hurt. But then I thought about it and realized that my sex was so good, he’d be back. It might be a couple of months or even a year or two, but they always come back.

I was right.

Right after Memorial Day, after months of noncommu­nication, I got an e-mail from Jayshawn supposedly just checking on me. I started not to respond to his simple “Sup” message, but I did. His next e-mail said, “I been missin’ my nigga and I got a few new things I need to show you.”

I started to make him wait, but since I hadn’t found a replacement for him, my plans to make him beg went out the window just like dirty dishwater. Now, only three weeks later, he and his loud-ass cell phone had to go.

I stomped back into my bedroom and saw Jayshawn in baggy jeans, a black wife-beater T-shirt, and a white do-rag on his head, stuffing a pair of boxers into the small black bag he’d brought. He grabbed his blue shirt the color of jeans, put it on, and began to button it.

“I’m real sorry ’bout this, fam, but I need to get on. I can’t believe this bitch is trippin’ like this. But she’s ask­ing me all kinds of questions, like what kind of work I’m doing and what hotel I’m staying at. Why she can’t call me at the hotel and shit.”

I didn’t respond because I didn’t want to curse his ass out, but this girl was smarter than the average sister who dealt with down-low bisexual brothers. And if he was so in love with her, why did he keep referring to her as a bitch? Didn’t she have a name? But I knew this was just Jayshawn’s way of hanging on to the street-boy credibility that he so cherished. Every time we’d finish banging, he always had that guilty I’m not gonna do this no more look.

“Are you gonna run me to the airport?” he asked.

“No,” I said without looking in his direction or missing a beat. I picked up the covers from the floor and climbed back into bed.

“How am I going to get there?” he asked, dumbfounded.

“You can take MARTA–the station is a couple blocks away–or you can use your loud-ass cell phone and call a cab. I’m done. See ya.” I pulled the covers over my head, welcomed the darkness, and wished someone would create a “no more dumb mofo” vaccine. And quickly, before some­one got hurt.

A few minutes later, I heard my front door slam shut.

***

If someone asked me who Chauncey Greer was, and I wanted to be really honest, what would I say? I’d start by telling them that due to a previous, painful experience my personal theme song is “Love Don’t Love Nobody. Believe That Shit!” So I’m not with the hardhead dude love/rela-tionship program.

I would tell them that I’m a reformed heartbreaker try­ing to do the right thing when it comes to dealing with other people. There was a time in my twenties when I broke a lot of hearts and didn’t give a damn about how the per­son felt when I told them to hit the road or when I stopped returning their phone calls. This one dude, Greg, claimed he was so in love with me that he was going to kill himself if I left him. At that time in my life I was so cold-blooded, I slammed the door in his face and silently waited for a gun­shot or broken window. I ignored him when I saw him a year later with another guy I’d slept with. I started to warn the other brotha that he was dealing with a psycho but felt they deserved one another–at that point in my life I would just go along to get along.

I’m a good-looking brotha (not bragging, just a simple fact) and I’ve had more than my share of equally good-looking brothers and maybe a half-dozen great-looking women. I have my weaknesses like any other man. I guess you could say I’m a LSC (light skin chaser). I prefer my men (and women) to be on the yellow side. Not the light bright and damn near white yellow, but that real nice golden brown. Good hair and light eyes doesn’t hurt. I’m not prejudiced or anything–I have mad respect for my darker-skinned brothers and sisters, since I’m chocolate myself–but my tastes tend to lighter.

I’m not confused about my sexuality. I’m basically bi with a gay leaning. You could say that my sexual tastes are similar to my love for gumbo. You feel what I’m saying? Sometimes I like a little sausage, other times a bit of shrimp. And every now and then, I get a taste for fish. But today, with so many people talking about down-low this and down-low that, it’s too much of a hassle dating women, because they ask too many damn questions. I still find myself attracted to women, but I don’t like to lie. I can save that sin for something else–like cussing out Jayshawn. The only thing brothas are interested in is your HIV status (like a brother gonna tell the truth) and how much you’re pack­ing. Which also adds to my reputation when word got out that my stuff could extend a couple zip codes. And sisters, even though they don’t want to admit it, like that shit, too. Size does matter–to both sexes.

Lately, though, I’ve been thinking about my own mor­tality, and since I already got a point against me for the sleeping-with-dudes thing, I’ve been trying very hard to be nicer and not lead on women and fat ugly brothas unless they’re exceptional. If statistics are right about the life span of a black man, then I’m approaching the halfway point. Maybe God won’t hold my having been a whorish asshole the early part of my life against me. Now, when I meet somebody I want to hook up with on a sex tip, I tell them right up front that I will only go out (or, let’s be honest, fuck) with them up to three times. When they ask me if I’m kidding, I look them dead in the eye and say when a person tells you who they are, believe them. It’s the one thing I got from watching Oprah every now and then.

Still, these days I treat people the way I want to be treated, which means being honest and saying what’s what. Some people seem to appreciate that, while others think they can change me. But I know me, and I ain’t about to change for anyone. Been there, done that, got the heart­break.
For me, love came calling the first time during the summer of 1982. My hometown–Greenwood, Mississippi–was as humid and sweaty as it always was when the extremely good-looking young outsider moved to town. I was strolling near an old dusty pink brick building known as Greenwood Junior High after a day of summer-school algebra. I hadn’t flunked the tough math course, but I’d made a D and my parents made me attend summer school “voluntarily,” forcing me to give up my annual trip to Chicago and my chance to play baseball. That made me mad, because I was just getting good at hitting the ball out of the park.

I looked toward the basketball court, where six young men ran up and down the court so fast, I wished I had the coordina­tion and height to play with them. I heard the rhythmic sound of the basketball hitting the pavement. Then the clinging of the metal nets as the basketball swooshed through. I closed my eyes and imagined that I was in the middle of Harlem, witnessing a game of New York street ball like I had seen on television. But when I opened my eyes, that’s when I saw him. He was wear­ing a nondescript white T-shirt and baggy shorts. He looked like a midget among a forest of tall trees. I found myself gazing at only him, and when he looked in my direction, an aggressively bright sun stung his golden brown face. His eyes sparkled like a cold glass of ginger ale. From a distance his body looked com­pact, without an ounce of fat.

One of his teammates shouted for him to shoot, and the ball flew from his hand and arched high in the air before hitting noth­ing but net.

I heard a guy say, “I guess you can play, D. I heard they can shoot some hoops down in Georgia.”

Another echoed, “Your shot is so sweet, from now on we gonna call you Sweet D.”

After a few more laps up and down the court, Sweet D stopped his stride and looked at me. He smiled as he twirled the burnt-orange ball on the tip of his finger, and I knew that some­how he would become an important part of my life. The way his eyes seemed to pierce through me cemented my feelings.

That summer I made a B in algebra. I prepared myself for geometry and high school, and my sexual confusion began tak­ing shape.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Reading Group Guide

1. The story of Chauncey’s past is interspersed with the main narrative. What does Harris achieve by telling the two stories simultaneously? In what ways do the past and the present play out against one another as the plot unfolds?

2. Chauncey calls himself “a reformed heartbreaker trying to do the right thing when it comes to dealing with other people” [p. 9]. Does “doing the right thing” require more than just “being honest and saying what’s what” [p. 11] with the men he briefly hooks up with? Are there consequences–to himself, as well as to his partners–that he doesn’t recognize or refuses to acknowledge? Is Chauncey’s casual approach to dating and sex widespread among men today, both straight and gay? Is the pattern common among women as well?

3. How has the growth of mega churches changed the practice of religion in contemporary America? Have these large, and usually wealthy, organizations abandoned the essential role of a church in the community? Is it possible to argue that a mega church, through its very size and marketing efforts, can attract Christians looking for a place to renew or rediscover their spirituality?

4. What was your reaction to the private party Chauncey attends [pp. 49—57]? Are the graphic descriptions of the various sexual encounters at the sex club, as well as other explicit scenes in the novel, integral to portraying Chauncey and his lifestyle in an accurate, realistic way?

5. Discuss Chauncey’s musings on sin [p. 58]. Do they express your own religious beliefs or moral principles? What specific values influence your judgments of your own and other people’s behavior? Is there an absolute moral code that applies to everyone or do individuals, religious authorities, or community standards define right and wrong?

6. Chauncey gives an important job to a new printer because he wants to “give a small black business a chance” [p. 66]. Do successful black businessmen have a duty to support other businesses within the black community? Is making a business decision on the basis of race (or gender or sexual preference) a form of discrimination?

7. Reverend Davis delivers a powerful sermon encouraging his followers to vote [p. 159]. Does the discussion of political or civic matters have a place in the church? Are there issues that religious leaders should not address? Have you experienced or read about incidents in which a minister, priest, or rabbi has crossed the line separating church and state? Is the political establishment guilty of bringing religious considerations into government policies and practices? Do you agree, for example, with Vincent’s claim that President Bush’s faith-based initiatives “get . . . ministers to sing his tune” [p. 221]?

8. Reverend Davis is aware of Damien and Grayson Upchurch’s ultraconservative views, yet he is eager to have him come to Abundant Joy. Are his explanations to Chauncey [pp. 178, 230—32] satisfactory? What are the ramifications, both good and bad, of giving Damien a forum to express his views?

9. Does the conversation between Chauncey and Damien [pp. 251—53] cast a different light on their past relationship? Do you think that Damien is sincere in his belief that what they were doing was wrong? What role did his fear of exposure play in his decision to betray Chauncey? How does Harris make their reconciliation believable?

10. I Say a Little Prayer features women only in secondary roles. Are Celia, Ms. Gladys, and Grayson Upchurch fully developed characters? Do their attitudes, problems, and achievements offer insights into lives of women in the African-American community? To what extent is Grayson Upchurch representative of a growing conservative trend in African-American politics?

11. Harris refers to several real people in the novel and also includes “cameo” appearances by characters from his other books. What does this add to your experience as a reader?  

12. The question of accepting gays and lesbians has caused disruption in many churches. Does Harris treat the subject in a balanced and honest way? Does he offer fresh insights into the gay and lesbian point of view? Does his depiction of religious leaders who reject gays and lesbians in their churches adequately explore their reasons and motivations?

13. Is the black community is more homophobic than society-at-large? What historical, social, and cultural forces might explain this?

14. From the fight for women’s suffrage to the civil rights movement, American society has been changed through citizen-led campaigns for equal rights. Is the gay-rights movement comparable to past struggle for equality?

15. The conflict at the heart of I Say A Little Prayer may remind you of a recent real-life scandal. The Reverend Ted Haggard, the former president of the National Association of Evangelicals, who frequently spoke out against gay rights and same-sex unions, was “outed” by a man who had a sexual relationship with him. Is exposing the hypocrisy of public figures a moral obligation we all share? Are there situations in which such exposure causes more harm than good?

16. I Say a Little Prayer carries a strong political message. Do you think exploring political themes enhances or undermines the power of Harris’s fiction?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 50 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2011

    Great book

    I was required to read this book for a class and i absolutely loved it! I kept my copy and lend it out to all my friends!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    AMAZING!!

    This book kept me on my toes, and also taught me a few things about myself. A MUST read!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    I say a little prayer

    Very good reab it make u think bout what u would do r how u would feel

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2012

    Not recommended

    The availability of book should be received. My account was credited & I had to reorder. The book is still showing available by seller. Please remove.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 6, 2011

    Didn't like it but you might...

    I didn't like the ghetto language from the sample...

    The writer knows the subject matter and has a compelling story line...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 10, 2010

    WOW

    I am a great fan of E. Lynn Harris' books! This is a page turner like all the rest!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2008

    Phenomenal & Funny!

    I thought this book was outstanding! I could never wanted to put it down. At the end of each chapter I could hardly wait to read what the next one had in store! The characters made this book funny as well. This was my first read by Harris and definitely won't be my last. I am looking into reading another one!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2008

    Definatley satisfied!

    I thought, 'I Say a Little Prayer,' was a GREAT book. I just got finished reading it. I have read many of Mr.Harris' books, and have yet to be disappointed!! I didn't want to put the book down!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2007

    Very good book

    Very good characters- believable. It's not easy being gay and finding a church to attend where you are accepted with open arms. Important issues in a wonderfully written story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2007

    A reviewer

    I had never read one of Mr. Harris' books, until this one. I was so disappointed. I bought this book at full price and sold it to Half-Price Books for $1. That is how bad it was. I didn't have any of his other works to use as comparison. I have been told by several E. Lynn Harris fans that this books is one of his weakest, if not the weakest book he has written. I don't know if I will be willing to read him again

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2007

    Could have been better......

    This one was okay but I didn't like Chauncey always biblically justifying his homosexuality no matter how responsible he was with it. This one was not as dramatic as some of E's previous books. However, I still look forward to the next one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2007

    Awesome!

    I enjoy reading and this is a great book. Anything written by E.Lynn I recommend that everyone should read...Good investment.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2007

    This was AWESOME!!!

    This was the first book that I had read by E. Lynn Harris, and I could not put the book down. I took it everywhere with me. I read it in two days. The way he is so desciptive and everything makes his characters really come alive!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2006

    What Else Did I Expect

    E. Lynn Harris grabbed my attention years ago. It was an eye-opener for me. His books have helped me to see life as a gay black man differently. Every since Invisible Life I have been reading his books and will continue to do so. What else can you expect but a good read from him. Looking forward to the next book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2006

    Good Book

    THIS BOOK WAS INTERESTING... IT WASN'T THE BEST I'VE READ BUT IT KEPT ME HUNGRY FOR MORE...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2006

    CRAZY

    I LOVED THIS BOOK FROM THE FIRST SENTENCE IT STATES ITS VERY GOOD AND I LOVED HOW MUCH DRAMA IS IN THE BOOK HARRIS DID IT ONCE AGAIN. IT SHOWS THAT YOU CAN GROW AND NEVER FORGET WHAT YOU HAVE DONE THE PAST WILL ALWAYS BE PRESENT ALSO ITS OK TO BE GAY AND NO A SEX AHOLIC

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2006

    Keep doing the damn thang!!!!!!!

    This book was outstanding. I read this book in a matter of hours. It was a real page turner.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2006

    I wanted more...

    I agree with those other readers on how E. Lynn did not have that same hot spice that captivate his readers. I have read every E. Lynn Harris book (and will continue to), but I wanted more of the drama that would have me thinking about this novel as if I saw it as a TV movie..I wanted that after thought...that..this book was the bomb!! type feeling. The excitement that would normally draw you to his novels was not there, and the ending was just that an ending...no fire.. no nothing just plain. I'm hoping the next novel due out in 08' has that spice, that page turner that grabs you and holds your attention, the type of read that'll have you up at night saying one more page then I'm going to sleep. Capture me..hold me..I want to feel like I'm there with them.. give me that 'OH MY GOD NO HE DIDN'T!! type drama.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2006

    Another hit!

    Another job well done! I always have to have another book ready to read because I finish all of Harris' books in a day or two. The story flows so well and you feel like you are in the story itself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2006

    A few things to think about

    I really enjoyed reading this book. I like how he stepped into another area politics and religion. In his other books he was into the gay men in sports. It's interesting to think about how many people may have once been in that lifestyle who are now speaking out against it because it's not society's norm. This book reminds us that some religious leaders, politicians and corporate executives are excepting of other lifestyles. It also makes you think about how many Chaunceys and Vincents you may know.

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