I Shall Wear Midnight: The Fourth Tiffany Aching Adventure (Discworld Series #38)
  • I Shall Wear Midnight: The Fourth Tiffany Aching Adventure (Discworld Series #38)
  • I Shall Wear Midnight: The Fourth Tiffany Aching Adventure (Discworld Series #38)

I Shall Wear Midnight: The Fourth Tiffany Aching Adventure (Discworld Series #38)

4.5 178
by Terry Pratchett
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Winner of the 2010 Andre Norton Award

It starts with whispers.

Then someone picks up a stone.

Finally, the fires begin.

When people turn on witches, the innocents suffer…

Tiffany Aching has spent years studying with senior witches, and now she is on her own. As the witch of the Chalk, she performs the bits of witchcraft that aren't sparkly,

…  See more details below

Overview

Winner of the 2010 Andre Norton Award

It starts with whispers.

Then someone picks up a stone.

Finally, the fires begin.

When people turn on witches, the innocents suffer…

Tiffany Aching has spent years studying with senior witches, and now she is on her own. As the witch of the Chalk, she performs the bits of witchcraft that aren't sparkly, aren't fun, don't involve any kind of wand, and that people seldom ever hear about: She does the unglamorous work of caring for the needy.

But someone—or something—is igniting fear, inculcating dark thoughts and angry murmurs against witches. Aided by her tiny blue allies, the Wee Free Men, Tiffany must find the source of this unrest and defeat the evil at its root—before it takes her life. Because if Tiffany falls, the whole Chalk falls with her.

Chilling drama combines with laughout-loud humor and searing insight as beloved and bestselling author Terry Pratchett tells the high-stakes story of a young witch who stands in the gap between good and evil.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)
“At once touchingly poignant and uproariously hilarious, this novel is a splendid goodbye to a batch of characters who will be missed by readers who still must admit that, with this fourth volume, their stories have been well and thoroughly told”—
Children's Literature - Patricia Williamson
Prachett has created a humorous and mysterious novel about a girl, Tiffany Aching, who is a witch and has been bestowed with the honor of protecting the area known as Chalk. She does not have as much experience as other witches but is determined to do her best for those who are needy when random fires begin to break out in the area. She does not have full control over what is happening but is directed by a very wise sage to The Wee Free Men. With their aide she begins to work to uncover and defeat the evil that has been plaguing the villages. Pratchett has great insight into Tiffany's emotional turmoil and brings her to life in a beautiful way, showing her growth as a protector and the depth of her love for the people she is destined to protect. This is the fourth book in a series about Tiffany Aching but the sixth in the series about The Wee Free Men. Tiffany has grown through her series and this is the culmination of her discovery of herself and her ability to stand up for the people of Chalk to defeat evil with good. There is a fabulous mix of old world setting and ideals with modern thinking. A great fantasy-mystery. Reviewer: Patricia Williamson
VOYA - Timothy Capehart
At eight years old, she whacked the Queen of Faerie with a frying pan and saved a future Baron. At eleven, she defeated the mind-destroying Hiver. At thirteen, she had to fend off the advances of the Wintersmith (an eldritch god-sort-of-spirity thing) and save the world (again). Now at very nearly sixteen, Tiffany Aching is considered the witch of the Chalk region, and she has the no-time-for-sleep schedule to prove it. But that's what being a witch IS: taking care of the people in your steading, all the rest is press-on warts and cackle-boxes. Tiffany is confused when those people start turning on her, and rumors, innuendo, and lies are accepted as truth. The Cunning Man, what's left of the evil spirit of an ancient witchfinder, has been awakened; and he's coming for Tiffany. As if that were not problem enough, the old Baron is dying and the baron-to-be (who all assumed would marry Tiffany) has a soppy fiancee...and a monstrous mother-in-law-to-be. Though the Nac Mac Feegles (Tiffany's small, blue, brogue-spewing protectors) mean to be helpful, they often just add to the chaos (often through bloodletting). Pratchett rounds off the Tiffany Aching adventures with what is likely the final volume (she is an adult now); though fans may be sad at that, there's nary a one who will be disappointed with this thrilling, humorous, moving and most wise tale that examines religious intolerance, memory, and loss without ever straying from Pratchett's trademark witty wordplay. Reviewer: Timothy Capehart
Library Journal
Pratchett's fourth—and final—book to feature young witch Tiffany Aching (The Wee Free Men, A Hat Full of Sky, Wintersmith) is a delight from start to finish. The trademark Pratchett humor is in full force along with the classic elements of a witch, a royal wedding, a royal funeral, a trip to the big city, and an ominous villain. Comic relief comes in the form of frequent appearance by the Nac Mac Feegle (who would not be out of place in a farcical miniproduction of Braveheart) and everyone's favorite randy old hag, Nanny Ogg. A character from early in the "Discworld" series makes a cameo appearance, and we meet a new character, the learned young man Preston. As usual, Pratchett makes wise and wry observations about human behavior, for example, "poison goes where poison's welcome" refers to the mob mentality.Verdict YA and adult readers who like strong heroines and classic tales will enjoy this volume, which is sure to be in demand by Discworld fans.—Amy Watts, Univ. of Georgia Lib., Athens
Library Journal - BookSmack!
Another witch story, this time starring Pratchett's plucky Tiffany Aching. Tiffany made her debut in The Wee Free Men (2003), in which she saved her brother from an evil queen and discovered her true calling as a witch. Three books later, she is the Witch of the Chalk, performing good works and keeping in check the baser instincts of her faerie friends, the Nac Mac Feegles-small, blue kilt-wearers best known for drinkin', fightin', and stealin'. She is unprepared for the coming of the Cunning Man, an energy that turns people against their witch. The villagers' respect turns to suspicion and hostility, leaving Tiffany to find who unleashed the Cunning Man's force and save herself from the flames. Pratchett's final foray into Tiffany's parcel of his Discworld is a sometimes bittersweet meditation on betrayal and forgiveness. Angelina Benedetti, "13 Going on 30", Booksmack! 10/21/10
Kirkus Reviews

Ask Tiffany Aching, and she'll tell you: It's not easy being a witch, especially when you're only almost 16 years old.

It can't be easy being Terry Pratchett, either, an author known foremost, perhaps, for his screamingly funny Discworld novels, of which this is the latest. Beneath everything he writes, however, even as he has readers howling helplessly with laughter, is a fierce, palpable love for his fellow human beings, however flawed they may be. A love that causes Tiffany over and over to square her shoulders beneath her pointy black hat and do what's needful.

He throws a lot at Tiffany, who crashed spectacularly into her calling when she armed herself with a skillet and, at the age of nine, ventured into Faerieland (which is not nearly as nice as it sounds) to steal her brother back from its Queen (The Wee Free Men, 2003). Here he challenges her with the Cunning Man, a centuries-old disembodied hatred that seeks ignorance and uses it—"Poison goes where poison's welcome"—against witches.

Themes of memory and forgetting run throughout this tale. Books preserve all memories, even the ones better consigned to oblivion. The Cunning Man is resurrected when Letitia, Tiffany's erstwhile swain Roland's fiancée (Pratchett confronts her with this betrayal, too) summons him inadvertently when trying to work a spell against Tiffany. But one of the Cunning Man's MOs is wanton book burning, a calculated obliteration of memories.

Witches, arguably, embody the accumulated wisdom of their craft, while the Cunning Man is a collective memory of evil. He operates by playing on fear and causing the common folk to forget what their witches have done for them. Tiffany must remember everything she's gleaned from all the witches who have trained her to defeat him, and the key is a childhood memory the old Baron shares with her on his deathbed.

It's not all heavy stuff. Pratchett leavens Tiffany's passage into adulthood with generous portions of assistance from the Nac Mac Feegle, the six-inch-high blue men whose love of boozin', fightin' and stealin' is subordinate only to their devotion to Tiffany, their Hag o' the Hills. When they utterly destroy the King's Head while on an errand for Tiffany, they rebuild the pub—back-to-front, rendering it the King's...oh, crivens, never mind.

And even as he demands more and more of Tiffany—her beau engaged elsewhere, her old Baron gone, the people of the Chalk turned against her—he gives her an army of friends and someone who loves words as much as she does, someone who, like Tiffany and, one suspects, the author himself, knows that "forgiveness" sounds "like a silk handkerchief gently falling down."

A passionately wise, spectacularly hilarious and surpassingly humane outing from a master.

Publishers Weekly
The final adventure in Pratchett's Tiffany Aching series brings this subset of Discworld novels to a moving and highly satisfactory conclusion. Tiffany, now nearly 16 years old, is forced to do battle with the hate-filled ghost of a long dead witchfinder, the Cunning Man, who has become obsessed with the young witch and is gradually turning her own community against her. As ever, Tiffany is ably supported by her loyal, intensely fractious, and totally amoral companions, the Nac Mac Feegles, whose leader, Rob Anybody, believes, "After all, ye ken, what would be the point of lyin' when you had nae done anything wrong?" She must deal with the heavy workload of a professional witch (birthing babies, training apprentices, and the like), fight evil, and come to terms with her former boyfriend's impending marriage. Pratchett's trademark wordplay and humor are much in evidence, but he's also interested in weightier topics, including religious prejudice and the importance of living a balanced life. Tiffany Aching fans, who have been waiting for this novel since Wintersmith (2006), should be ecstatic. Ages 12–up. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
"He is a satirist of enormous talent... Incredibly funny, compulsively readable."
The Times

"Teen witch Tiffany is one of [Pratchett's] most formidable creations yet."
 —Time Out

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"At once touchingly poignant and uproariously hilarious, this novel is a splendid goodbye to a batch of characters who will be missed by readers who still must admit that, with this fourth volume, their stories have been well and thoroughly told"—
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“At once touchingly poignant and uproariously hilarious, this novel is a splendid goodbye to a batch of characters who will be missed by readers who still must admit that, with this fourth volume, their stories have been well and thoroughly told”—
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)
“At once touchingly poignant and uproariously hilarious, this novel is a splendid goodbye to a batch of characters who will be missed by readers who still must admit that, with this fourth volume, their stories have been well and thoroughly told”—
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—This is the final adventure of the young witch, Tiffany Aching, and her obnoxious, fawning, and yet lovable small blue companions, the Nac Mac Feegles. In many ways it's a coming-of-age novel, as Tiffany is now on her own. Known as "The Hag O'the Hills," she spends her time tending to the messy, menial, everyday things that no one else will take care of, such as fixing bones or easing the pain of a dying man. But as she tries to serve the people of the Chalk hills, she senses a growing distrust of her, and a loss of respect for witches in general. Along with the Nac Mac Feegles, she has to seek out the source of this growing fear. Tiffany discovers she may have been responsible for waking an evil force when she kissed the winter in Wintersmith (HarperTempest, 2006). The Cunning Man is in need of a host body and is searching for Tiffany. Pratchett combines gut-busting humor and amusing footnotes with a genuine poignancy as Tiffany tries to decide what her future should be. Fans of the author's "Discworld" (HarperCollins) books will enjoy the connections with the larger series, particularly the inclusion of Granny Weatherwax. Simply put, this fourth and final book in the series is an undisputed triumph.—Tim Wadham, St. Louis County Library, MO

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061433047
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/28/2010
Series:
Discworld Series, #38
Pages:
355
Sales rank:
393,855
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.20(d)
Lexile:
900L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

TERRY PRATCHETT is one of the most popular authors writing in the UK today. He is the acclaimed creator of the Discworld series, the first title in which, The Colour of Magic, was pubilshed in 1983. Worldwide sales of his books are in excess of 55 million and they have been translated into 36 languages. His first Discworld novel for younger readers, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, was awarded the 2001 Carnegie Medal. Terry Pratchett was appointed OBE in 1998.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Date of Birth:
April 28, 1948
Place of Birth:
Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England
Education:
Four honorary degrees in literature from the universities of Portsmouth, Bristol, Bath and Warwick

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

I Shall Wear Midnight: The Fourth Tiffany Aching Adventure (Discworld Series #38) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 178 reviews.
Harbin More than 1 year ago
For those familiar with the works of Pratchett, you will not be disappointed. For those new to Discworld, it will leave you wanting to know more of not only the backstories of the characters in this book, but other inhabitants that make Discworld a favorite escape from reality for millions of Terry Pratchett fans worldwide. This is the first of his works that I have read on my Nook, so it took me a second to figure out how to access the footnotes that Pratchett utilizes in every book of his that I have read. You have to wake up your touch screen, then touch the circle on the right side to select the footnote. Once it is read, you touch the circle again to take you back to the page you were reading.
Ashburysgr More than 1 year ago
I was able to receive a UK copy of this fro a friend and finished this today. WOW! I honestly cannot think of one part of this book that was a let down. The whole book flowed from begining to end. The action was very well paced, and I must say very dark for a Young Adult novel, but that is the good thigabout Terry's work. He knows that young adult are just that young adults. As he stated in Theif of Time, kittens and puppies grow up to be cats and dogs, so kids need to have more adult material to help change their minds, to hlp shape them into the adults that they will become. And a bit of a spolier here that is what this book is about. Changing the way people think, perfect topic for Young Adults, but no even for Young Adults for Adult Adults as well. It seems that some characters might be coming to an end, but others are rising to take their place. It is nice to see old characters coming back into the series after so long away. I want to say more, but don't want to give away too much. What is really sad is the cover art of the books since on the UK covers there is a HUGE HINT as to the ending of the book that s lost with the US covers. I think the artists in the US should be fired and just spend the money and get Kidby's cover art on th book. I think the money that they mae from Terry's work would give them more than enought for that, and they would make even more. But as I said a GREAT book, and most definately worth a second, third, fourth, fifth..... reading. When this is released I wil buy i for my nook and I might wear out the screen reading it so much. Also, when it is stated that this is the last Tiffany book I do not thin that we have seen the last of Tiffany. Just like this and othe novels (especially with this novel) characters keeping coming back for cameos. Plus is you look a Stephen King when he said that he would write no more Dark Tower novels, now there will be a 8th book in the works I do not thing an author can never say never! I hope so Tiffany is a hell of a character and not to write about her would be horrible. Buy this book and enjoy many many times!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As with most of Pratchet's work, you get glimpses into the truth of people in a wonderfully engaging way. A fitting conclusion for the intrepid and human yet witchy Tiffany Aching.
DannyME More than 1 year ago
Tiffany Aching refuses to wear midnight-the dark colors traditional for witches. And though she is growing older, she also refuses to give up the seemingly innocent ways of her people. But when evil looms, she is forced to don the mantle of her craft and stand against the darkness. The fourth and final book of Terry Pratchett's Tiffany Aching series leads the young witch through physical and personal mine fields, accompanied by the loyal and obstinate Nac Mac Feegle-an army of tiny blue, rowdy, drunken pixies. Not yet 16 years old, Tiffany is now the official witch of the Chalk, her pastoral home region, and must uphold the duties expected of any adult witch. She understands the vagaries of her people, but lacks many of the experiences of her older sister witches. Something wicked walks the world however. An evil spirit is turning the people against their witches, and it may be Tiffany's fault. When the beloved Baron dies, and Tiffany is blamed, her tenuous standing among the inhabitants grows even more strained. By the customs of her profession, and to prove her abilities to care for her land, Tiffany must stand alone to fight against the Cunning Man, an ancient Omnian witch-hunter returned from the dead. How she fares in this battle decides not only her place among the witches and her people, but also the fate of the world. Like Douglas Adams and Tom Holt, Pratchett has long been known for his ability to intricately weave social and personal issues with laugh-out-loud humor in a style often unique to British authors. The 38 books of his DiscWorld series have touched upon seemingly every social issue, all while steeped firmly in an outlandish and hilarious fantasy world. And while his Young Adult Tiffany Aching series contains all of these, I Shall Wear Midnight seems especially poignant and insightful. Whereas the first book in the series, The Wee Free Men, introduced a nine-year-old Tiffany and her minuscule band of blue fighters, she was a more innocent, wide-eyed child, who slowly grew through the next two books. In Midnight, however, Tiffany experiences personal moments that all who have suffered the strains of such insecurities have felt. And it is up to her to find the strengths within to overcome the terror-to walk through the flames and accept the Midnight we all must wear, without being consumed by its darkness. I Shall Wear Midnight is a masterfully fitting and strong end to this series within a series. While it may leave one longing for more adventures of Tiffany and her friends, its resolutions and inspirations confirm that, wherever her journeys may lead, Tiffany and the wee free men will clomp, shout, and muddle through just fine. - Danny Evarts This review originally appeared in Shroud Magazine Issue #10, Oct. 2010
harstan More than 1 year ago
Trained in witchcraft by experts like Nanny Ogg (unofficially in this case that is), Tiffany Aching has become the Witch of the Chalk. Being young and wanting fun with and without witchcraft, Tiffany understands her responsibility to perform the spells to help those in need although she gains no acclaim as she does her work diligently in secret. Adding to her discomfit is reactions of the normal are rarely what she expects them to be. However while at a fair feeling like a fool tied to her broom; just like the little kids with balloons, Tiffany senses something is not right. Soon people begin to assault witches for no apparent reason beyond their normal fear of the witches. She and her miniscule belligerent intoxicated pals, the Wee Free Men, begin to search what is playing on the trepidations of people towards witches. Needing help, she journeys to Ankh Morpork to meet with Roland, the baron's heir and with a shopkeeper before returning to confront whatever evil is stalking the Chalk. Targeting teens, the fourth Aching fantasy (see The Wee Free Men, A Hat Full of Sky and Wintersmith) is a terrific entry that will have readers fully engrossed in the exciting story line. Yet the tale also ponders deep philosophical issues of esteem, fitting in (or not) and it's okay to be different and to a degree alone while making a strong case to speak up if you are domestic abuse victim. All that and more without decelerating and linked to the Discworld saga; fans of that great satirical series will also relish Tiffany's coming of age final test escapades Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was the last book Pratchett wrote worth reading. One could see where the disease process had slowed him and made him less graceful, but it was still read as if he was only a little off his game.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dancingsnowflakes More than 1 year ago
this book has made me a terry Pratchett fan. Others are better at reviews than myself.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As witty and hilarious as ever
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I don't have any children, but I'll read anything by Terry Pratchett that I can get. Even though this series is for younger readers I've thoroughly enjoyed the whole collection. When I first started reading Wee Free Men I pictured my nieces reading the series too, but by the time I got to this book I had decided that some of the subjects and scenarios in this, the last book in the Tiffany Aching set, might only be suitable for my teenaged niece. This book is the most emotionally challenging and mature of the series, but it still has plenty of Discworld humor, and lots of characters from the main series, including the Lancre witches and the Ankh Morpork Watch. This is a must have for the Discworld fan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not going to say much because this book is too good to spoil and besides I'm tired from just waking up. An amazing conclusion. Glad to see Esk after almost thirty years. I say thirty years even though I'm sixteen, because that's how long ago equal rites was written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its got me it it so how bad can it be? By Rob Anybody Feegle
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago