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I Spy Colors in Art
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I Spy Colors in Art

by Lucy Micklethwait
 

I spy with my little eye . . . a yellow circle, an orange orange, two blue eyes staring right back at me!

The whole family will delight in exploring fine art through these fourteen glorious paintings, ranging from ancient to contemporary, their artists hailing from all around the globe. Each time you look at one of the colorful canvases in this book—or in a

Overview

I spy with my little eye . . . a yellow circle, an orange orange, two blue eyes staring right back at me!

The whole family will delight in exploring fine art through these fourteen glorious paintings, ranging from ancient to contemporary, their artists hailing from all around the globe. Each time you look at one of the colorful canvases in this book—or in a museum—you're sure to discover another delightful and surprising detail.

What a wonderful way to foster a love of art in the youngest of children and to instill an appreciation for close observation and attention to detail.

What do you spy?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Leah Hanson
I spy with my little eye a white moon, a brown cow, and a green elephant. What can you see? Micklethwait's newest addition to her "I Spy" art series delivers more beautifully reproduced paintings from a variety of genres, time periods, and cultures. From a fifteenth century French book illustration to an enigmatic Rene Magritte painting, the art selections provide a visual feast that will prompt hours of looking. The author's text invites young readers to search for colors in the paintings by focusing on familiar objects—socks, spoons, shapes, keys—but in the search for these objects, children will find even more interesting details. In an introductory note, Micklethwait explains how she first played these "I Spy" games with her own children and found that the game was a fun and easy introduction to great works of art. Now grown, her children helped select the works featured in this book. This is an excellent take-along for a trip to the local art museum and can be used to inspire children to look closely at art. Reviewer: Leah Hanson
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2
Micklethwait continues the series concept of matching simple, familiar statements with examples of ever-changing artistic styles and subject matter. The fine art included here ranges from a 15th-century Nativity scene ("I spy with my little eye a brown cow") to a 21st-century painting by Michael Craig-Martin entitled Eyetest , featuring brightly hued common objects arranged in a hierarchy of sizes ("I spy with my little eye lots of colors"). As viewers discover a purple square, green elephant, and pink socks, they are building up, in the author's words, "a store of images." The repetition of the refrain and the large font employed for each object, in combination with the visual clues, make this a natural choice for both preschoolers and beginning readers. Adults can easily extend the game with other items on the pages or with pictures in other settings, including galleries. Titles and artists are identified in context; dates and locations are provided as endnotes. In a market flooded with collections of reproductions masquerading as concept books, this one is the real deal.
—Wendy LukehartCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061348372
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/21/2007
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
1,171,805
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Lucy Micklethwait says, "I began to play 'I Spy' with paintings with my own children when they were very young. Over and over again my children pointed out things which I had never noticed before—an apple that had fallen to the floor, a funny-shaped shoe, an expression on a face. Although we were simply 'looking at pictures,' I was well aware that, by making these paintings accessible, I was enabling my children to build up a store of images in their own minds which must inevitably lead to some interest in fine art." Ms. Micklethwait's books for children include I Spy Shapes in Art; I Spy: An Alphabet in Art; I Spy Two Eyes: Numbers in Art.

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