I Tell My Heart: The Art of Horace Pippin

I Tell My Heart: The Art of Horace Pippin

by Judith Stein
     
 

One of the foremost African-American artists of the twentieth century, Horace Pippin came to prominence in the late 1930s between the heyday of the American Scene painters and the ascendancy of Abstract Expressionism. An unschooled painter who was a disabled World War I veteran, Pippin is represented in public and private collections across America. I Tell My Heart… See more details below

Overview

One of the foremost African-American artists of the twentieth century, Horace Pippin came to prominence in the late 1930s between the heyday of the American Scene painters and the ascendancy of Abstract Expressionism. An unschooled painter who was a disabled World War I veteran, Pippin is represented in public and private collections across America. I Tell My Heart features over 110 Pippin paintings including many never before reproduced nor shown in public since the artist's lifetime, as well as many black and white archival photographs of Pippin and his contemporaries. Pippin provides a first-hand view of several little-celebrated aspects of African-American culture: documentation of the bravery of black soldiers in combat; the dignity, beauty, and hardships of everyday life among rural people circa 1900; and the strength and warmth of intergenerational familial relationships. The book is divided into five thematic areas - war, genre, academic, biblical, and historical subjects - giving readers the opportunity to discover the breadth of Pippin's visual imagination. A chronology of his life, an exhibition history, a list of all known works, along with a selected bibliography provide the most complete and thorough information about Horace Pippin that has ever been collected. A diverse group of distinguished scholars have freshly considered all aspects of Pippin's life and work. Judith E. Stein constructs a fuller picture of Pippin as an artist and as a man by using his letters and by culling his quoted remarks from period publications. Cornel West explores Pippin's significance vis a vis American and African-American cultural history. Authors Lynda Roscoe Hartigan, Richard J. Powell, and Judith Wilson shed new light on Pippin's iconography - from his images of war to his biblical inspirations. And conservators Mark F. Bockrath and Barbara A. Buckley discuss Pippin's process and technique, a subject never addressed before. I Tell My Heart restores Horace Pippin

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
As art history absorbs the lessons of multiculturalism, this book, based on an exhibition, should launch Pippin (1888-1946) into a well-deserved place in the pantheon of modern American painters. Pippin was a self-taught African American artist who scrutinized his world with visual honesty. His paintings have been previously summarized as ``primitive'' or folk art ``naive'' in technique and vision; Stein ( Red Grooms , LJ 7/86) and assorted other scholars bring Pippin's work back into its full artistic worth and provide it with social context. The book is beautifully organized, with essays on the artist's life and times, a superb section on technique, and a reference section that includes chronology, exhibition history, a catalogue raisonne of known works, and an index to the paintings. This intellectually crafted and emotionally appealing look at a black artist's experiences is recommended for both public and academic library collections.-- Paula A. Baxter, NYPL

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780876637852
Publisher:
Universe Publishing
Publication date:
08/02/1993
Pages:
210
Product dimensions:
8.76(w) x 11.25(h) x 0.87(d)

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