I, Too, Sing America: Three Centuries of African American Poetry

Overview

From the first known African American poet, Lucy Terry, to recent poet laureate Rita Dove, I, TOO, SING AMERICA captures the enormous talent and passion of black writers. This powerful and diverse, this unique collection spans three centuries of poetry in America as poets bare their souls, speak their minds, trace their roots, and proclaim their dreams in the thirty-six poems compiled here. The voices of Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, W. E. B. Dubois, and Gwendolyn Brooks, among others, create an energetic ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $125.00   
  • Used (23) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$125.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(146)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

From the first known African American poet, Lucy Terry, to recent poet laureate Rita Dove, I, TOO, SING AMERICA captures the enormous talent and passion of black writers. This powerful and diverse, this unique collection spans three centuries of poetry in America as poets bare their souls, speak their minds, trace their roots, and proclaim their dreams in the thirty-six poems compiled here. The voices of Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, W. E. B. Dubois, and Gwendolyn Brooks, among others, create an energetic blend of tone and tempo, ardor and awe. From lamentations to celebrations, these poems reveal the ironies of black America, juxtaposing themes of resistance and reconciliation, hope and despair. Each poem is further illuminated with notes, a brief biography of the poet, and stunning visual interpretations. Clinton and Alcorn have created a stirring tribute to these great poets, as well as a remarkable volume that will move any reader.

A collection of poems by African-American writers, including Lucy Terry, Gwendolyn Bennett, and Alice Walker.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
A splendid, rattling good collection of African-American poetry. Represented are 25 poets (and 35 poems), some of whom are household namesW.E.B. Du Bois, Maya Angelou, Rita Dove, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, and Langston Hughes. There are examples of the influential Harlem Renaissance poets—Angelina Weld Grimk, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Jean Toomer, for example—and the first known poem composed by an African-American, Lucy Terry's Bars Fight.' The brimming anger of James M. Whitfield comes through, along with the injustice of lines that had to be transcribed by others because African-Americans were denied by law the right to put poetry to paper. Clinton includes short biographical sketches and critical snippets on every poet, and these only further the impact of the tragic, warm, sad, and ferocious voices of great presence that survived beyond all odds. Alcorn's elegant illustrations have an expressiveness that honors the words.
Kirkus Reviews
Children's Literature - Trina Heidt
When one is given a book-a gift-of poetry, it is sometimes hard to define the characteristics that distinguish it from every other anthology in its category. In the case of this splendid group of poems by African American writers, the special qualities virtually leap off the page and demand to be noticed. Notably, there is the strong visual appeal of the illustrations by Stephen Alcorn. Softly colored but strongly evocative, these pages perfectly complement the poems they describe with impressionistic images. Then there are the brief biographies of each of the twenty-five poets. Clinton has added these intriguing sketches to place the poet in historical context, but also to establish a timeline, a progression, of the African American presence in America. The biographies include enticing tidbits of Black history and lore, such as the fact that poet James Weldon Johnson served as consul to Venezuela in n
VOYA - Avis D. Matthews
Brief biographical sketches and critical analyses of twenty-five African American poets accompany their works, from Lucy Terry (1730-1821) and Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784) to Nikki Giovanni and 1993 U.S. poet laureate Rita Dove. The slim volume is valuable in its revelation of the breadth of African American poetry, the range of poetic voices among African Americans, and the less-talked-about poets such as Terry and James M. Whitfield (1822-1871). Selections include Paul Laurence Dunbar's "We Wear the Mask," Langston Hughes's "The Negro Speaks of Rivers," Gwendolyn Brooks's "We Real Cool," and Maya Angelou's "And Still I Rise." Most poets get one entry except, rightly so, the Harlem Renaissance writers--Gwendolyn Bennett, Countee Cullen, Hughes, Claude McKay, and Georgia Douglas Johnson--who get two or three each, along with the marvelous modern-era poet Gwendolyn Brooks. The inclusion of only one Dunbar poem is disappointing. Leading up to the Harlem Renaissance, Dunbar was the most well-known African American poet. Clinton might have been reluctant to include his controversial dialect verse, but Dunbar had a full body of "king's English" poetry. His patriotic "The Colored Soldiers" would have been an ideal inclusion here. Surprisingly, there also is only one work--though it is two pages long--by Phillis Wheatley. Colorful as they are, Acorn's illustrations are distracting, much like music videos that interpret their stories for viewers. Teens who grew up on music videos might not be so distracted. YA readers needing general, introductory material on African American poetry, poets, or history, or those just being turned on to African American literature, will find this an informative resource. However, poetry lovers who simply want to read more and those doing in-depth reports should skip this and consult another source, such as the 1997 Norton Anthology of African-American Literature (W. W. Norton). Illus. VOYA Codes: 4Q 3P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12).
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-How do three centuries of African-American poetry fit into 128 pages? With a firm editorial hand, as exhibited in this volume. Clinton has selected one poem (or occasionally a few) by 25 prominent poets from the 1700s to the present. A page of brief biographical and critical text introduces each poet's work. The result is introductory and broad. Readers will need other resources to explore these writers more fully, but this collection should "touch the imagination," as the author hopes. Each poem is illustrated on the facing page with one of Alcorn's strong, colorful, and imagistic paintings (reminiscent of the work of Aaron Douglas and the Harlem Renaissance). This artwork as well as the taupe patterned block prints make this book a truly beautiful visual interpretation of the collection. This title could serve as an introduction to Arnold Adoff's The Poetry of Black America (Harper, 1973) and I Am the Darker Brother (S & S, 1997) or stand alone in any collection.-Nina Lindsay, Oakland Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
A splendid, rattling good collection of African-American poetry. Represented are 25 poets (and 35 poems), some of whom are household names—-W.E.B. Du Bois, Maya Angelou, Rita Dove, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, and Langston Hughes. There are examples of the influential Harlem Renaissance poets—-Angelina Weld Grimké, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Jean Toomer, for example, and the first known poem composed by an African-American, Lucy Terry's "Bars Fight." The brimming anger of James M. Whitfield comes through, along with the injustice of lines that had to be transcribed by others because African- Americans were denied by law the right to put poetry to paper. Clinton includes short biographical sketches and critical snippets on every poet, and these only further the impact of the tragic, warm, sad, and ferocious voices of great presence that survived beyond all odds. Acorn's elegant illustrations have an expressiveness that honors the words. (Poetry. 10+)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780395895993
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 10/28/1998
  • Edition description: None
  • Pages: 128
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.03 (w) x 11.48 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephen Alcorn is an acclaimed painter and printmaker who has created artwork for a number of anthologies. He lives in Cambridge, New York.

Catherine Clinton earned her undergraduate degree in Afro-American studies from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in history from Princeton. She is the author of many historical works for children and adults, including I, TOO, SING AMERICA: THREE CENTURIES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN POETRY, and has taught African American Studies at Brandeis University, Brown University, and at Harvard University, where she is a fellow at the Dubois Institute. Dr. Clinton lives in Connecticut with her husband and two sons.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2000

    Great gift book for all ages!

    This is an exceptional book with a fine selection of poetry from oft ignored Black voices supplemented by wonderfully developed and thought provoking illustrations aimed at a young adult audience, but a delight for any reader.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)