I Want to Be Somebody New! [NOOK Book]

Overview

Spot, the beloved hero of Put Me in the Zoo, is back in another Beginner Book classic. When Spot grows tired of doing tricks in the circus, he decides to turn into another animal. But what kind? An elephant? An elephant is too big. A giraffe? A giraffe is too tall. How about a mouse? Can Spot’s friends help him see that the very best thing to be is himself? I Want to Be Somebody New! is a spot-on tale of individuality and friendship.

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I Want to Be Somebody New!

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Overview

Spot, the beloved hero of Put Me in the Zoo, is back in another Beginner Book classic. When Spot grows tired of doing tricks in the circus, he decides to turn into another animal. But what kind? An elephant? An elephant is too big. A giraffe? A giraffe is too tall. How about a mouse? Can Spot’s friends help him see that the very best thing to be is himself? I Want to Be Somebody New! is a spot-on tale of individuality and friendship.

Originally created by Dr. Seuss, Beginner Books encourage children to read all by themselves, with simple words and illustrations that give clues to their meaning.

"Spot changes from elephant to giraffe to mouse, trying to find a new identity, but discovers that every animal shape has its drawbacks. This intelligent, cheerful sequel, with its simple rhyming text, lives up to the reputation of its predecessor."--Publishers Weekly. 

From the Hardcover edition.

Tired of doing tricks in a circus, a large spotted animal decides he wants to be something different such as a mouse, an elephant, or a giraffe.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Spot, who in Put Me in the Zoo learned that he was better off performing in a circus than behind bars at the zoo, returns with his two human friends. Spot changes from elephant to giraffe to mouse, trying to find a new identity. But he discovers that every animal shape has its drawbacks. As an elephant Spot can't squeeze into his favorite chair; as a giraffe his friends can't see his face; as a mouse he can't reach the door to his house. Finally Spot's friends convince him that being somebody new is never going to feel as good as just being his same old, spot-juggling self. This intelligent, cheerful sequel, with its simple rhyming text, lives up to the reputation of its predecessor. The art, which hasn't changed since the first book was published (1960), has a dated, but familiar look. (5-8)
Children's Literature - Carly Reagan
You may remember Spot, the beloved creature (Dog? Tiger? Leopard?) from the 1960 installment of the "Beginner Books" series, Put Me in the Zoo. In this sequel, Spot decides that he no longer wants to do tricks with his spots as he has been doing all this time, and that he would like to turn into some other sort of animal instead. After transforming into an elephant, giraffe, and mouse, he finds that he would much rather be himself after all. This is quite a familiar theme to children's stories, encouraging kids to be themselves no matter what others think. What makes this story unfortunate, therefore, is the fact that Spot decides to return to his previous form not because he himself does not like the other creatures, but rather because his friends tell him what they don't like about them. They call him "big" and "fat" as an elephant, tell him "We do not like you tall at all" as a giraffe, and give him all the reasons why no one wants a mouse around. The message of the importance of being oneself is lost in Spot's friends' focus upon his outward appearance rather than who he is regardless of his size. As a beginning reader book, it does the job. The words are simple and repetitive, and would be easy for a new reader to follow. For a tale about being yourself and liking who you are, try stories with a more positive message, such as I'm Special, I'm Me by Ann Meek or Mo Willems's Edwina: The Dinosaur Who Didn't Know She Was Extinct. Reviewer: Carly Reagan
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1 After a hiatus exceeding some 25 years, Spot, the main character in Put Me in the Zoo (Random, 1960) reappears. Spot is not happy with himself, and he magically transforms himself into an elephant, a giraffe, and finally a mouse. It takes the girl and the boy whom Spot first met when he wanted to be in the zoo to convince Spot that they like him best when he is being himself. Although the familiar trademarks of this series, brightly colored illustrations and simple rhyming sentences, remain unchanged, the book has several flaws. The theme of self acceptance is quite admirable, but when Spot appears as an elephant, his friends point out that he's too fat, as a giraffe he is too tall, and as a mouse too small. Those children who see themselves in the above descriptions might actually be getting the reverse message from what the story is trying to convey. A book that might pose problems to children who are sensitive about their physical appearance. Tom S. Hurlburt, Minneapolis Public Library
From the Publisher
“This intelligent, cheerful sequel, with its simple rhyming text, lives up to the reputation of its predecessor.”—Publishers Weekly
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385754538
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 8/28/2013
  • Series: Beginner Books(R)
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 630,732
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Robert Lopshire was the illustrator of numerous children’s books. He died in 2002.
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2009

    My toddler loves it.

    It's not as charming or well written as the first book "Put Me in the Zoo" but it is still loved by my toddler. The illustrations have changed from the first, a mistake in my mind. The kids were cuter in the first. Regardless, the book is for my child and she doesn't care and she loves it. Plus, it's a great message - just be yourself, love who you are. Can't beat that in today's world.

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  • Posted May 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Great series

    My 9 year old loves this guy from put me in a zoo to all the other storys about this spotted cat. Its great for learning colors, shapes and self esteem. Its a fun bed time story to enjoy with your child

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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