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I Want to Paint My Bathroom Blue
     

I Want to Paint My Bathroom Blue

5.0 1
by Ruth Krauss, Maurice Sendak (Illustrator)
 

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Continuing a two-year program to bring back twenty-two Maurice Sendak treasures long out of print, our second season of publication highlights one of the most successful author-illustrator pairings of all time. A pioneer of great children's literature, Ruth Krausspublished more than thirty books for children during a career that spanned forty years. Krauss and

Overview

Continuing a two-year program to bring back twenty-two Maurice Sendak treasures long out of print, our second season of publication highlights one of the most successful author-illustrator pairings of all time. A pioneer of great children's literature, Ruth Krausspublished more than thirty books for children during a career that spanned forty years. Krauss and Sendak collaborated on eight books, and we are delighted to reintroduce four of these gems in brand-new editions, together with a favorite Maurice Sendak picture book.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review
Once again in few words Ruth Krauss reveals theinnermost feelings of little children. Maurice Sendak's pictures show the happiness and activity of the little boy as, in his pretend world, he accomplishes all his big ideas.
Publishers Weekly
Now in its second season, HarperCollins's reissue of 22 Sendak classics continues. This time, his collaborations with Ruth Krauss take center stage. In Charlotte and the White Horse, first published in 1955, creamy pages frame Sendak's softly lit illustrations of a girl who convinces her father to keep a wobbly legged horse and cares for him until he can stand on his own. Sendak's delicate watercolors suit the dream-like mood of a boy who accomplishes all that he sets out to do in his imaginary world, in I Want to Paint My Bathroom Blue (1956), also by Krauss. A boy's imagination also comes to the fore in A Very Special House (1953) by Krauss, as the artist depicts the hero creating a home filled with a turtle, a giant, a very old lion and "some monkeys and some skunkeys." Oversize pages brim with the creatures as well as his house's "very special" furnishings. Open House for Butterflies (1960) takes a similar format to these collaborators' classic A Hole Is to Dig, and lastly, Hector Protector and As I Went Over the Water: Two Nursery Rhymes (1965) by Sendak conveys as much plot through the artist's wordless spreads as with the minimal text. For collectors and budding readers alike. Nov. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
This is a gentle story that describes the dream of a young child. The movement of the story ebbs and flows as fantasy grows and impossibilities happen. The dream itself is a peaceful stream of consciousness that invites the reader to join the fun of creating the perfect house. The house contains colors of the rainbow, windows opened to life's possibilities, friends and family, and the wonders of nature--plants, animals, stars and the ocean. The watercolor illustrations flow like the story and contribute to the peacefulness of the dream. This book is a perfect addition to those saved for bedtime tuck-ins and late night lullabies. 2002 (orig. 1956), HarperCollins, $14.95. Ages 3 to 7. Reviewer: Andrea Sears Andrews

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060286347
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
12/28/2001
Series:
Sendak Reissues Series
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
8.62(w) x 6.75(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Ruth Krauss (1901-1993) is the author of over thirty books for children, including the classics The Carrot Seed, illustrated by her husband, Crockett Johnson, and A Hole Is to Dig, illustrated by Maurice Sendak. "Ruth Krauss's intuitive ability as a writer to capture the free-spirited thought processes and laughter of young children ensures her books' widespread acceptance and timeless appeal." So concludes her entry in children's Books and Their Creators (1995).

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.

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I Want to Paint My Bathroom Blue 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was my favorite book growing up. I memorized all the words to it! This book was given to my mom when she was younger and will be passed down to my kids!