I Will Fear No Evil

( 44 )

Overview

Johann Sebastian Bach Smith is immensely rich—and very old. His mind is still keen, so he has surgeons transplant his brain into a new body—the body of his gorgeous, recently deceased secretary, Eunice. But Eunice hasn't completely vacated her body.

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I Will Fear No Evil

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Overview

Johann Sebastian Bach Smith is immensely rich—and very old. His mind is still keen, so he has surgeons transplant his brain into a new body—the body of his gorgeous, recently deceased secretary, Eunice. But Eunice hasn't completely vacated her body.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780441359172
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/28/1987
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 594,712
  • Product dimensions: 4.12 (w) x 6.86 (h) x 1.14 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Anson Heinlein was born in Missouri in 1907, and was raised there. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1929, but was forced by illness to retire from the Navy in 1934. He settled in California and over the next five years held a variety of jobs while doing post-graduate work in mathematics and physics at the University of California. In 1939 he sold his first science fiction story to Astounding magazine and soon devoted himself to the genre.

He was a four-time winner of the Hugo Award for his novels Stranger in a Strange Land (1961), Starship Troopers (1959), Double Star (1956), and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress (1966). His Future History series, incorporating both short stories and novels, was first mapped out in 1941. The series charts the social, political, and technological changes shaping human society from the present through several centuries into the future.

Robert A. Heinlein's books were among the first works of science fiction to reach bestseller status in both hardcover and paperback. he continued to work into his eighties, and his work never ceased to amaze, to entertain, and to generate controversy. By the time hed died, in 1988, it was evident that he was one of the formative talents of science fiction: a writer whose unique vision, unflagging energy, and persistence, over the course of five decades, made a great impact on the American mind.

Biography

Robert Anson Heinlein was born in Butler, Missouri in 1907. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, he was retired, disabled, in 1934. He studied mathematics and physics at the graduate school of the University of California and owned a silver mine before beginning to write science fiction in 1939. In 1947 his first book of fiction, Rocket Ship Galileo, was published.

Heinlein was guest commentator for the Apollo 11 first lunar landing. In 1975 he received the Grand Master Nebula Award for lifetime achievement. Mr. Heinlein died in 1988.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Books (USA).

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    1. Also Known As:
      Anson MacDonald; Robert Anson Heinlein (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      July 7, 1907
    2. Place of Birth:
      Butler, Missouri
    1. Date of Death:
      May 8, 1988
    2. Place of Death:
      Carmel, California

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 44 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(22)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 44 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2008

    Missing pages

    Not the best Heinlein and when I finally got finished with page 320 I found the next page was 353! The book was smooth bound, so nothing had fallen out, it was simply missing 32 pages. I guess I will try to find a hardcover copy to see if it has the same problem.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 17, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Highly recommended for the open mind.

    In order to read this book, you must have an open mind about gender and life. In order to understand the full story, one must not allow society's opinions of gender squash the message portrayed by the story. A great read and it speaks to the human condition.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 11, 2010

    Great idea. Bad book.

    The book is about brain transplants. Even though the concept seems out of a B-Movie (or maybe E-Movie) I am a fan of Robert Heinlein and know that he has some great and thought provoking books. The author goes well up to page 100. From there the story goes down the drain. What I have most trouble is how the main character goes from Business Tycoon to a caricature of girlie girl. It makes no sense.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 1999

    I Will Fear This Novel

    I made a valid attempt to finish IWFNE, really I did. But in the end, the monotony and lifeless characters forced me to put it down. The story seemed to remain in an endless loop of sexual banter and culinary delights. Sorry Robert, I gave it my best shot. If you are thinking of exploring his work,don't let this be your first Heinlein experience.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2014

    Flbyo o

    ?
    Gufhihkropfh b,iyiyitrugj .

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 12, 2013

    Great read

    Old favorite loved reading again.

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  • Posted December 23, 2012

     

     

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2012

    Recommended - Social Science Fiction

    If your'e a hard-core SCI-FI fan, this one is not for you. Set in a mid-21st Century future where American Society has largely broken down, but written with the mid-20th century principles of free love, this is a wild mental ride. It is plodding at first, but finishes strong. Keep an open mind.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2012

    Fun book

    Somewhat ridiclous

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  • Posted April 21, 2012

    Gives a whole new perspective on the female sexual experience.

    Heinlein really gets into his "feminine side" with this book. A multibillionare has his brain transfered into the body of a sexy woman and learns how the other side thinks and feels. He learns all about the female body and the wonder of multiple orgasms. Sexual without being pornographic and a very entertaining read.

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  • Posted January 22, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Coming To Terms With The Cycles of Life

    “I Will Fear No Evil” by Robert Heinlen is a dramatically woven story of the potential pros and cons of performing brain transplants. Johann Smith, the main character, is a man who is extremely wealthy but only has a limited time left to live on earth. In the story Mr. Smith mentions that he constantly heard the saying “You Can’t Take It With You.” He was determined to get around that phrase by undergoing a brain transplant with a willing and healthy body between 20-40 years old. He ends up unexpectedly having a brain transplant with Eunice Branca. Mr. Smith is very familiar with her because she was his favorite secretary. The only reason why I gave this story only three stars is due to the fact that I was expecting more spontaneous action plot elements similar to what are seen in the Star Trek and Star Wars movies. This book is more for those who are looking for a book that is centered around the conversation dialogue of characters describing their feelings on life and what they are going to do.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    Loved it

    Good characters. Great story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2011

    If you enjoy Si-Fi this is the book for you

    One of my all time favorites ever. R. Heinline was one of the best.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2007

    The author is delusional

    Johann Sebastian Bach Smith is filthy rich and about 90 years old. He arranges to have his brain transplanted into a younger body when he goes. It just happens that the body is that of his gorgeous female secretary, Eunice. So, now he has to learn to be female... and it also just so happens that Eunice still kind of inhabits her body and the two of them have really great conversations. Okay. Interesting idea. I could not read more than half of this. I found the dialogue stilted and awkward. I kept thinking, people don't really talk like this! I couldn't keep my disbelief suspended. And, by the way, Eunice acts like men wish women would, but few do. Really unbelievable and disgusting. Lots of adult topics explored. Not impressed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2002

    Heinlein Is Genius

    For those of you who dont know and said this book is poop compared to his other books thats because he passed away before he finished writing it. He didn't even get to do any rewrites or editing which is where he makes his books what they are. This book is a wonderful look into the mind of a man who has to learn how to become a woman. It does have a lot of sex but it's justified by the story. Heinlein writes so well that after reading any of his books i fell like i can go to that world and live without sticking out like a sore thumb. deffentially give any Henlein book a read.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2001

    Heinlein Sticks His Neck Out

    This is one deeply weird read. Its view of a violent, polluted, sex-crazed future is certainly unique and controversial. I absolutely cannot believe that it hasn't been banned somewhere (or has it?..I don't really know) just for the raunchiness (bikinis and body paint are standard office wear and an overripe 13-year-old girl climbs naked into the lap of her dad's 71-year old male boss--his wife and her parents think it's cute) and general promiscuity. Not much in the way of plot but worth reading once.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2000

    Not average Heinlein but fun

    Just like most of RAH's novels I read this one cover to cover in about 2 days. It's naughty but nice and somewhat more simplistic than the author's masterpieces. IWFNE reminded me somewhat of my first Heinlein book: Friday. It's a fun to read in the sun type of deal, not a must read novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 44 Customer Reviews

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