I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon

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Overview

Celebrated journalist, TV personality, and award-winning author Touré investigates one of the most enigmatic and fascinating figures in contemporary American culture:

PRINCE

Drawing on new research and enlivened by Touré’s unique pop-cultural fluency, I Would Die 4 U relies on surprising and in-depth interviews with Prince’s band members, former girlfriends, musicologists, and even Bible scholars to ...

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Overview

Celebrated journalist, TV personality, and award-winning author Touré investigates one of the most enigmatic and fascinating figures in contemporary American culture:

PRINCE

Drawing on new research and enlivened by Touré’s unique pop-cultural fluency, I Would Die 4 U relies on surprising and in-depth interviews with Prince’s band members, former girlfriends, musicologists, and even Bible scholars to deconstruct the artist’s life and work.

Prince’s baby boomer status allowed him to play a wise older brother to the latchkey kids of generation X. Defying traditional categories of race, gender, and sexuality, he nonetheless presents a very traditional conception of religion and God in his music. He was an MTV megastar and a religious evangelist, using images of sex and profanity to invite us into a musical conversation about the healing power of God. By demystifying the man and his music, I Would Die 4 U shows us how Prince defined a generation.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

With a pianist/songwriter father and a jazz singer mother, Prince Rogers Nelson was born to be a musician; but in the crowded pop music scene, can anyone be destined to be as famous as he has become? Music journalist and TV personality Touré answers that question by describing how the Minnesota-born became a breakthrough artist who challenged stereotypes of gender, race, sexuality, and religion. Would Die 4 U finally explains the enigma of a very popular outsider.

Publishers Weekly
Through interviews with Prince's current and former band members, managers, notable musicians, and musicologists, Toure (Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?) presents an eclectic portrait of the musician and composer. A pop star uniquely suited to speak to the alienation and sexuality of generation X, Prince is also deeply religious, and, in his personal and professional life, emotionally distant. He was precocious and ambitious from a very early age, a latch-key kid whose extreme devotion to music served as an escape from a dysfunctional upbringing. This later translated to intense and complicated relationships with his backing bands over the years, as well as difficulty forming intimate relationships. Highly conscious of his public persona as a "hypersexual trickster" in touch with his femininity, Prince employed "a plethora of identity idioms to break free of the conventions and strictures of Black male identity." However, Toure makes the case that his music has always been a "collision of the spiritual and profane," as rife with sexuality as with profound, sincerely held religious images. In this sense, even his most iconic, memorable hits— such as "Purple Rain" and "When Doves Cry"—come from "the most badass preacher that pop music has ever seen." (Mar.)
From the Publisher
Praise for Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?:

“Touré demolishes the notion that there is only one way to be racially authentic . . . funny, hip and current.” –Gwen Ifill, The Washington Post

One of the most acutely observed accounts of what it is like to be young, black, and middle-class in America. Touré inventively draws on a range of evidence . . . for a performance carried through with unsparing honesty.” —Orlando Patterson, The New York Times Book Review

“[T]he ever provocative Touré boldly articulates the complicated issues of self and racial identity in the age of Obama.” —Vanity Fair

“A personal and scholarly dissection of race issues in modern America. . . . With the help of an array of writers, performers, comedians, artists and intellectuals, among others, the author attempts to reach a consensus on what is typical or otherwise for African-Americans, as well as what Black identity means in the modern era. Yet despite the chorus of voices, the most powerful voice belongs to Touré. While his collected anecdotal evidence provides a necessary framework, his personal experiences with race ring loudest of all. A likely bellwether for America's future struggles with race.” —Kirkus Reviews

“A welcome response to the ‘self-appointed identity cops’ who would arrest and banish those they consider insufficiently black. Perceptively analyze[s] a new sensibility in black art and culture to illustrate the complex and fluid racial identification Touré dubs ‘post-blackness.’” —San Francisco Chronicle

“Touré candidly tackles a burning issue confronting us today. Black America is undeniably a community ‘free, but not equal,’ and people from all walks of life are compelled to devise new approaches to confronting today’s structural inequalities. Here Touré explores insights from many perspectives to help guide the way.” —Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, Sr.

This book is quintessential Touré: smart, funny, irreverent, and provocative as hell. Rejecting old school racial dogma and new school myths about post-raciality, he offers a powerful and original thesis on the status of Blackness in the 21st century. Through his sharp analysis and honest reflections, Touré challenges us to embrace a more mature, sophisticated, and ultimately liberating notion of racial identity. Any serious conversation on race and culture must begin with this book.”
—Dr. Marc Lamont Hill, Columbia University Professor and host of “Our World With Black Enterprise”

Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness is a necessary book. To fulfill your potential as an individual or as a people, you need a clear sense of self. Touré has done the difficult but liberating work of moving the discussion of race beyond the Black Power-era thinking of the 1970's into the 21st Century.”
— Reggie Hudlin, filmmaker

“A fascinating conversation among some of America’s most brilliant and insightful Black thinkers candidly exploring Black identity in America today. Touré powerfully captures the pain and dissonance of Black Americans’ far too often unrequited love for our great nation.”
—Benjamin Todd Jealous, President and CEO of the NAACP

Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness is a tour de force! I applaud Touré’s courage in standing up and telling it like it is. This special book will make you think, laugh, cry—and it will make you look at race and at yourself differently.”
—Amy DuBois Barnett, Editor-in-Chief, Ebony

“Touré has taken a question I have asked myself uncountable times over the course of my life and asked it of everyone: ‘What does it mean to be Black?’ The answers in this book are thought-provoking, uplifting, hilarious and sometimes sad. His sharp writing and self-effacing stories help digest some hard facts about how identity can be used for and against each of us – and why it matters so much to all of us.”
—Soledad O’Brien, CNN anchor and special correspondent

Praise for Touré:

"[An] apostle of the hip-hop aesthetic." —Darryl Pinckney, New York Review of Books

"Touré is one of our nation’s most astute and witty observes of the American scene. Not only is he one of the most gifted writers of his generation, but his sharp insight, poetic phrasing, and biting humor—and his brilliant command of so many aspects of pop culture—make his dazzling performance on page a sheer joy to read.” —Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown University

"Touré is an exceptional journalist...He is—if you can imagine it—Oscar Wilde as a street thug. This is the marvelous tone he's been able to achieve." —Tom Wolfe

"Touré has the sarcasm, intellect, and dogged nose for narrative that has made him his generation’s premiere chronicler of the chaos, ambition, and boundary-crossing that have accompanied African-American culture’s rude and ingenious takeover of American Pop, Inc.” —Greg Tate

"From 50 Cent to Dale Earnhardt, Jr., we sent Touré out on stories and he got it, whatever it was, every time. His work is like his subjects: stylish, vivid, and burning with energy.”—Jann Wenner, founder of Rolling Stone

The Morton Report
“A worthwhile addition to the relatively small number of decent books about Prince. It’s certainly bound to be a conversation (or possibly debate) starter for serious Prince fans.”
Q-Tip
Toure is one of my favorite writers and Prince is on the Mount Rushmore of modern music and this is the best book about Prince I've ever read.
Questlove
"I'm a Prince scholar and this is the ultimate Prince book."
Q-Tip
Toure is one of my favorite writers and Prince is on the Mount Rushmore of modern music and this is the best book about Prince I've ever read.
Jann Wenner
“It took the singular talent and journalistic skills of Toure to capture the wild genius and larger than life influence of Prince.”
Joe Levy
“For those who understand how singular an artist Prince is, this book — every bit obsessive and revelatory as its subject — will be a great pleasure. For everyone else, it's mandatory. It unfolds like a good mystery, as cryptic clues are deciphered one after another.”
John Heilemann
In terms of creativity, energy, influence, and sheer virtuosity, few musicians in my lifetime rival Prince — and in Toure, he's met his perfect authorial match. As a fanboy of both, I was waiting excitedly for this book, but it's even better than I expected. In these illuminating pages, Toure reveals Prince as an artist and cultural force in full.
Henry Louis Gates Jr.
"Based on his Du Bois Lectures at Harvard, Toure has written a thoughtful and compelling book that is both a full and sensitive explication of the genius of Prince's music, as well as his exemplary role as an seminal figure in contemporary American culture. It is must reading for any student of popular culture."
Jann Wenner
“It took the singular talent and journalistic skills of Toure to capture the wild genius and larger than life influence of Prince.”
Joe Levy
“For those who understand how singular an artist Prince is, this book — every bit obsessive and revelatory as its subject — will be a great pleasure. For everyone else, it's mandatory. It unfolds like a good mystery, as cryptic clues are deciphered one after another.”
From the Publisher
Praise for Touré:

"[An] apostle of the hip-hop aesthetic." —Darryl Pinckney, New York Review of Books

"Touré is one of our nation’s most astute and witty observes of the American scene. Not only is he one of the most gifted writers of his generation, but his sharp insight, poetic phrasing, and biting humor—and his brilliant command of so many aspects of pop culture—make his dazzling performance on page a sheer joy to read.” —Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown University

"Touré is an exceptional journalist...He is—if you can imagine it—Oscar Wilde as a street thug. This is the marvelous tone he's been able to achieve." —Tom Wolfe

"Touré has the sarcasm, intellect, and dogged nose for narrative that has made him his generation’s premiere chronicler of the chaos, ambition, and boundary-crossing that have accompanied African-American culture’s rude and ingenious takeover of American Pop, Inc.” —Greg Tate

"From 50 Cent to Dale Earnhardt, Jr., we sent Touré out on stories and he got it, whatever it was, every time. His work is like his subjects: stylish, vivid, and burning with energy.”—Jann Wenner, founder of Rolling Stone

Praise for Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?:

“Touré demolishes the notion that there is only one way to be racially authentic . . . funny, hip and current.” –Gwen Ifill, The Washington Post

“One of the most acutely observed accounts of what it is like to be young, black, and middle-class in America. Touré inventively draws on a range of evidence . . . for a performance carried through with unsparing honesty.” —Orlando Patterson, The New York Times Book Review

“[T]he ever provocative Touré boldly articulates the complicated issues of self and racial identity in the age of Obama.” —Vanity Fair

“A personal and scholarly dissection of race issues in modern America. . . . With the help of an array of writers, performers, comedians, artists and intellectuals, among others, the author attempts to reach a consensus on what is typical or otherwise for African-Americans, as well as what Black identity means in the modern era. Yet despite the chorus of voices, the most powerful voice belongs to Touré. While his collected anecdotal evidence provides a necessary framework, his personal experiences with race ring loudest of all. A likely bellwether for America's future struggles with race.” —Kirkus Reviews

“A welcome response to the ‘self-appointed identity cops’ who would arrest and banish those they consider insufficiently black. Perceptively analyze[s] a new sensibility in black art and culture to illustrate the complex and fluid racial identification Touré dubs ‘post-blackness.’” —San Francisco Chronicle

“Touré candidly tackles a burning issue confronting us today. Black America is undeniably a community ‘free, but not equal,’ and people from all walks of life are compelled to devise new approaches to confronting today’s structural inequalities. Here Touré explores insights from many perspectives to help guide the way.” —Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, Sr.

“This book is quintessential Touré: smart, funny, irreverent, and provocative as hell. Rejecting old school racial dogma and new school myths about post-raciality, he offers a powerful and original thesis on the status of Blackness in the 21st century. Through his sharp analysis and honest reflections, Touré challenges us to embrace a more mature, sophisticated, and ultimately liberating notion of racial identity. Any serious conversation on race and culture must begin with this book.”

—Dr. Marc Lamont Hill, Columbia University Professor and host of “Our World With Black Enterprise”

“Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness is a necessary book. To fulfill your potential as an individual or as a people, you need a clear sense of self. Touré has done the difficult but liberating work of moving the discussion of race beyond the Black Power-era thinking of the 1970's into the 21st Century.”

— Reggie Hudlin, filmmaker

“A fascinating conversation among some of America’s most brilliant and insightful Black thinkers candidly exploring Black identity in America today. Touré powerfully captures the pain and dissonance of Black Americans’ far too often unrequited love for our great nation.”

—Benjamin Todd Jealous, President and CEO of the NAACP

“Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness is a tour de force! I applaud Touré’s courage in standing up and telling it like it is. This special book will make you think, laugh, cry—and it will make you look at race and at yourself differently.”

—Amy DuBois Barnett, Editor-in-Chief, Ebony

“Touré has taken a question I have asked myself uncountable times over the course of my life and asked it of everyone: ‘What does it mean to be Black?’ The answers in this book are thought-provoking, uplifting, hilarious and sometimes sad. His sharp writing and self-effacing stories help digest some hard facts about how identity can be used for and against each of us – and why it matters so much to all of us.”

—Soledad O’Brien, CNN anchor and special correspondent

Library Journal
Prince embodied plurality. Presenting himself as androgynous, queer, biracial, and messianic, he transgressed traditional boundaries of gender, sexuality, race, and religion. Here Touré (Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?) attempts to tease out the disparate lines that make up Prince’s persona, to demystify a man who is definitively, purposefully mysterious. The book draws from three lectures Touré delivered at Harvard last March, but what might have been clear and concise when spoken now reads as leaden, oversimplified, and repetitive. He ranges from pseudopsychology—Does Prince play with gender as a way to replace his absent mother?—to unnecessary lyric paraphrase—“Prince puts the girl in the colorful chapeau on the back of his motorcycle”—to (reductively) searching for the biographical source of his music—Did the incestuous relationship described in “Sister” happen? The book is at its best when describing a basketball match between the author and Prince, when Touré drops the scalpel and allows Prince to just be.

Verdict One wishes that Questlove, who is quoted extensively, wrote his own book. Too focused on arguing his thesis, Touré seems to have missed the essence of Prince altogether. Much more satisfying is Hilton Als’s recent Harper’s essay “I Am Your Conscious, I Am Love,” a personal look at the icon’s ascent into the mainstream. Worthwhile for only the most dedicated of Prince fans.—Molly McArdle, Library Journal

(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Reviews
Interpretive exegesis of the songs and style of the artist formerly and currently known as Prince. Touré (Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?: What It Means to Be Black Now, 2011, etc.) argues that though Prince was chronologically a late boomer, he became an icon for Generation X, people born between 1965 and 1982, a time of lower birthrates and social anomie. Prince's own difficult, lonely childhood gave him the ambition and remove to forge a rock-funk hybrid that was both spiritual and highly sexual, and this gave him an iconic appeal to the disillusioned demographic that came of age in the 1980s, during Prince's run of hit albums beginning with "1999." In support of this, Touré discusses the content of many of Prince's songs, focusing more on the responses to Prince's work than on what Prince actually did to create it. Touré also discusses Prince's relationship with his backing musicians, significant to his thesis since Prince was one of the first rock stars to recruit a fully diverse band. Although the author talked to other scholars, Prince's collaborators and former lovers, he's not pursuing a concrete look at the nitty-gritty of Prince's innovations in the studio or a narrative of his career arc's sharp rise (and moderate decline). Instead, he offers a broad overview of Prince's life and career, tied to his own ideas about demography and race. Touré spends lots of pages of this slim volume returning to his meditations on the qualities of Generation X relative to Prince--e.g., "It's appropriate to critique the media vision of gen X as unfairly whitewashed, but to say that Blacks are not part of gen X is short-sighted"--and this aspect of his approach comes to seem repetitive and dated. Mostly engaging and will hold greatest appeal to readers who are already fans of Touré, Prince or both.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781476705491
  • Publisher: Atria Books
  • Publication date: 3/19/2013
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 163
  • Sales rank: 230,569
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Touré is a cohost of MSNBC’s The Cycle and a columnist for Time.com. He is the author of four books, including Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?, a New York Times and Washington Post notable book, and I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon. He lives in Brooklyn.

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Read an Excerpt

I Would Die 4 U


  • IMAGINE A FIELD THE SIZE OF AMERICA. The field is filled with people. They represent all the people who care about American popular culture, people who feel American popular culture speaks to them and helps shape and define their lives. In the middle of the field is a stage the size of Nebraska. Many people are on the stage dancing and singing and rhyming and acting and saying, “Look at me!” These people represent stars in American popular culture. Then, someone comes strolling through the field toward the stage holding a large, open umbrella, even though it’s not raining. As this person walks onto the stage, the audience wonders, “Why is he holding an umbrella? It’s not raining.” A moment later, it begins to rain. The rain represents the feelings of the people in the audience—their dreams, fears, anxieties, and longings. It adds up to the ethos of the generation. The rain is the Zeitgeist. And the person who had the umbrella open before the rain is an icon. That person knew what the generation was feeling before they really knew, before they were able to fully articulate their feelings. When the icon takes their place on the stage they don’t say, “Look at me!” They say, “When you look at me, you’ll also be looking at you.”

Stars entertain us. Icons do something much more. They embody us. They tell us something about who we are and who we want to be. They are both a mirror and a shaping force. Zeitgeist is German for the spirit of the times, the general cultural, intellectual, and political climate within a nation, or a specific group, in a particular period. You could call it the collective consciousness of a given people at a certain time. Icons can see and feel the Zeitgeist of their generation more clearly than the rest of us. They have the antennae, the sensitivity, and the intellect to become a thermometer of their era, and they have the talent to reflect the Zeitgeist through their art. For generation X, one of those icons was Prince.

There are truths about the soul of a generation that icons can see, as if they’re mystics, because they have vision and because they’re immersed in the culture. They are in the clubs and the bars and on the streets and they have their antennae up and they’re picking up signals about what’s going on in the world faster and more clearly than everyone around them. This not a skill that can be taught. It’s extraordinarily difficult to make statements that will resonate deeply with several million people in your generation, but that’s what icons do. They are not only mirrors, showing the generation who they are: they are connectors, bringing together a giant tribe, and sometimes they are sculptors, inspiring the generation to become something. Prince rose in the 1980s to become the mirror, connector, and sculptor of a generation, and he knew it. In 1998, I interviewed him for a cover story for Icon magazine and asked, “Do you realize you’ve changed a generation with your music?” Prince became defensive. His body stiffened. The thought of it was too much. “I don’t think about that,” he snapped. “Why would I? There’s no gain in that. Being in control of someone’s thoughts? You’ll second-guess your writing.” He didn’t see the value in being conscious of his influence, but he didn’t deny that it was true.

Of course, it takes more than antennae to become an icon. Prince developed every skill that would make him become a rock star. He learned how to write timeless songs in a range of genres with masterful construction. (Questlove, the drummer for the Roots who has worked with Prince, says Prince’s best albums were built with the dramatic structure of Shakespearean plays: rising action, comic relief, climax, and denouement.) He could sing in a unique, spellbinding way. He could play music in an unforgettable way; he was not just a guitar virtuoso but the master of many other instruments including drums, percussion, bass, keyboards, and synthesizer. He could dance in his own compelling style. He could perform with a rare intensity, and demonstrated a stage generalship that outshone all of his contemporaries except, perhaps, Michael Jackson. He had presence and was spine-tinglingly sexy if you were inclined to be attracted to him and, even if you weren’t, he still seemed devastatingly cool. He conveyed a sense of mystery, and had an ineffability about him that left you unable to fully sum him up or feel as though you really knew him, keeping you intrigued. All this was powered by a superhuman work ethic. He knew the importance of sweat equity as a kid. In Possessed: The Rise and Fall of Prince by Alex Hahn, a cousin reports that Prince as a young teenager told him, “I’m going to practice my behind off like James Brown’s band, and I’m going to have everything so tight that you’re not going to be able to say anything about it.”1 He would grow up to be constantly working. His ex-wife Mayte once told London’s Daily Mail, “Being with him was like being at the centre of a twenty-four-hour creative machine. If we weren’t on stage, we were rehearsing. If we weren’t rehearsing, we were in the studio.” That’s why Prince, for a long time, put out an album per year while most artists were releasing one every two years, and Michael Jackson once every four years, like a president. These are albums he wrote, produced, and played most or all of the instruments on. He was legendary for working day and night, an inexhaustible music monster. As he says in “All the Critics Love U In New York”: “Body don’t wanna quit. Gotta get another hit.”

Several people told me Prince often worked sessions that lasted twenty-four or even thirty-six hours. Chuck Zwicky, one of his engineers, told me, “I’ve always admired the diligence and discipline that Prince has and his work ethic. He just kept going and kept working until he had it. I’ve had more than one forty hour day with him. Pretty intense. He’s extremely hard working and, much to the chagrin of women, he’d rather spend his time working on his music than hanging out in a club.” Zwicky said that Prince’s time in the studio was almost always spent efficiently, moving at a rapid pace compared to his music-business peers. “He never spent an inordinate amount of time on one song,” Zwicky said. “I’ve worked with artists who will agonize over a single song for many, many days. I’ve never seen Prince do that. He’s got a very, very clear idea in his head about what the song needs to do, what it needs to sound like and he could get through it very quickly. So, typically, a session started with three written songs and ended with three completely mixed songs. He never second guesses himself and he never scratches his head. He never says, I wonder if this is good or not?”

Alan Leeds, who was from 1983 to 1992 Prince’s tour manager and vice president of Paisley Park Records, said, “This is a guy who has studio diarrhea. Like you go to an office every day from nine to five, well, he goes to the studio every day. What am I gonna do today? Well, I wrote these lyrics last night in bed so I’ll make up a song. Then, he’ll sit with that song and say does it fit with what I’ve been doing? If it doesn’t, then it gets thrown in the vault. But he’s constantly, constantly creating songs. So, for every song on Purple Rain, there’s probably thirty or forty or fifty that didn’t make the cut because they just didn’t fit.” Zwicky once told the Minneapolis Star Tribune, “He was so prolific, by the time he released an album, he may have had literally ten albums sitting around.”2

Prince studied all sorts of music. Eric Leeds, Alan’s brother, who played saxophone in his band on tour and during the recording of Parade, Sign “O” The Times, The Black Album, and LoveSexy, said, “Prince was quite a historian of music and could listen to something and suck up the essence of it.” Associates recalled him doing a dead-on impression of Elvis, quoting obscure Bootsy Collins songs, and listening to Culture Club. Susan Rogers, who was Prince’s recording engineer and maintenance tech for five years spanning from Purple Rain to Sign “O” The Times and is now an associate professor in the department of music production and engineering at the Berklee College of Music, said, “He was a big fan of Culture Club, but you got the sense he wasn’t playing it for enjoyment’s sake, he played it over and over as a student of the game. A scholar.” A former girlfriend said he also loved Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Erykah Badu, Stevie Wonder, Joni Mitchell, and Mozart. “He thinks he could’ve been him in a past life. He draws a lot of parallels between himself and Mozart.” She told me that, at one point, Amadeus was Prince’s favorite movie.

In early interviews, when asked about influences, Prince pointed to Carlos Santana, Joni Mitchell, and James Brown, who he said he danced with onstage as a child. But, surely, he was also influenced by Sly Stone, Curtis Mayfield, Miles Davis, George Clinton, Rick James, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Jackie Wilson, Jerry Lee Lewis, the Beatles, Earth Wind & Fire, David Bowie, Mick Jagger, Elvis, and Jimi Hendrix. Zwicky named others as well. “When he sits down at the drums he hears Dave Garibaldi (Tower of Power). When he plays his guitar parts, he’s thinking about James Brown’s guitarists (Jimmy Nolen and Catfish Collins); those guys had the definitive funk chord approach to the guitar. When he plays the bass, he’s thinking like Larry Graham (Sly and the Family Stone). When he’s at the keyboards, he’s either thinking like a horn section or like Gary Numan. And singing wise, I mean, there’s a ton of influences. The most beautiful thing with Prince’s vocals is when he does his background vocals. You listen to any one of those tracks on its own and it’s a totally different personality singing. Together it conveys sense of the group singing. These days, if the lead singer sings the background parts it doesn’t really sound as big because everybody’s inflecting and speaking in the exact same way. With Prince you literally felt like you were, for lack of a better analogy, in a church and there’s six people around you. Some can sing better than others and they all have obvious personalities to them. But when you put it all together, those six voices sound bigger than twenty tracks of one voice. So, like, he’s got this band in his head of all these unique individual musicians. But the sum of it is Prince music. It doesn’t sound like obviously influenced.”

Part of why Prince was so knowledgeable at such a young age is because he was able to soak in sonic information at an extraordinary rate. “One of his chief strengths was his ability to observe, assimilate and then reinterpret,” said Dez Dickerson, who played guitar with Prince from 1979 to 1983. “So, with every engineer he worked with, he was observing and assimilating recording techniques. He was also observing and assimilating songwriting techniques and stuff that was freely happening inside the band. And all of that influenced him and he became a shape-shifter—he became great at assimilating these techniques and reinterpreting them in a way people didn’t recognize. And that became the genius of Prince.” He also bolstered his musical education in the mid-eighties, after Purple Rain was released, by inviting the people close to him to introduce him to sounds they loved. In Possessed, Alex Hahn writes, “that led to Wendy and Lisa playing him the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin while Eric and Alan Leeds played him Miles Davis, Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus.”3

Far from being bogged down by influences, Prince created his own genre, which mixed soul, funk, rock and pop and allowed him to be daringly innovative. Questlove said, “Prince is probably the only artist who got to live the dream of constant innovation. He pushed the boundaries with rhythm and structure and chords that no artist has ever done. He knew the balance between innovation and America’s digestive system. He’s the only artist who was able to, basically, feed babies the most elaborate of foods that you would never give a child and know exactly how to break down the portions so they could digest it. I mean, ‘When Doves Cry’ is probably the most radical song of the first five years of the 1980s because there’s no bass. You don’t strip down pop music. It’s supposed to be full orchestration. I heard the version of ‘Doves Cry’ with a bassline. It wouldn’t have grabbed me. Without bass it had a desperate, cold feeling to it. It made you concentrate on his voice. The narration of the song is dealing with, ‘Why am I the way I am?’ and it’s important that you let the words paint the scenario and with the bass line you could get lost. It was distracting. With the bassline, the song was cool. Without it, it was astounding.”

Prince also removed the bassline from “Kiss.” He put backwards drums on “Starfish and Coffee.” He omitted the hi-hat cymbal in “It.” He used a method called vary speed, which is basically him singing or playing with the tape sped up or slowed down, to get the high-pitched guitar solo on “Erotic City” and the female-sounding voice for his alter ego Camille, which he used on “Shockadelica,” “If I Was Your Girlfriend,” “Feel U Up,” “Strange Relationship,” and others. Those songs were part of the scrapped 1986 album called Camille.

Questlove also told me Prince had a unique ability to program the LinnDrum machine in a way that makes it sound and feel as though a human is playing drums. “He’s always adding fills and rolls that are way beyond the four-bar monotonous programming stuff of 1980s music. He’s smart enough to program little things that only drummers notice. He’d purposely speed things up during the chorus and slow it down during the verse just to make you think a real drummer’s playing. He was able to take the LinnDrum machine and humanize it. He established the drum machine as the bass and not the drummer and created a sound with drums that you’d never heard before. To my ears, Prince is, bar none, the best drum programmer of all time. I’ll put Prince up against my favorite hiphop drum programmers. He is the master.” Questlove also pointed out that Prince often mixed programming and human percussion on the same song, for example, on “Lady Cab Driver” he gave us a live snare and a programmed kick and hi-hat. On “Automatic” there’s live cymbals and a programmed kick and snare.

Prince wrote great, timeless pop songs because he understood what was sonically essential. “There are so many popular records that don’t contain great songs,” said Susan Rogers. “If you strip them down no one is going to sit down and learn the chord changes. But Prince was a strong enough songwriter that you could strip his songs down to just the skeleton and you’d have something pretty valid there. You’d have good lyric writing, in some cases great, and you’d have strong melodies. And on top of that he was able to add harmonic progressions that were innovative and smart. Underneath that he was able to add a rhythmic foundation that was great. He taught me that you should be able to strip out everything except the bass and drums and maybe one rhythm instrument and it should sound like a record. He was so smart, he truly understood how each piece needs to function. It’s rare for music makers to really understand that.” Rogers said Prince also understood how to use all of the major ways to make songs connect with listeners. “I’m a psychologist,” she said. “I know that there are three avenues through which listeners can bond with a piece of music. There’s our motor system—music can make us move. There’s our emotional system—even something without drums in it can move us. Just chord changes alone can move us emotionally. And there is our cognitive system—lyrics can make us think. If you’re a genius at any one of those you don’t need to be that good at anything else. So, in other words, James Brown makes you move, even if you don’t understand English. Those who are geniuses with melody and can write a great chord change will make us feel. Those who are geniuses at lyrics, whether it’s Bob Dylan or Bob Marley, will make us think. Prince understood those three avenues. He knew that he had three ways to connect with people and, unlike most of the artists I’ve ever worked with, he aimed to be a master at all three. Very few artists are that strong.”

Of course, Prince’s innovative sound was difficult for some people to understand. Zwicky said, “A friend of mine, who was dating him back in the era of 1999 and Purple Rain, said people would just walk right up to him and confront him about his music saying, ‘What kind of music is that you’re doing? It’s not rock, it’s not funk. What is this?’ Well, he was doing what he liked to hear.”

Prince also developed into a bandleader who knew just how to push the musicians who worked with him past their capabilities, and bring things out of people that they didn’t know they could do. Eric Leeds said, “This is the kinda guy who had the ability to walk in a room and instantaneously present a musical vision. He could get us together and all of a sudden realize something that was on a rarified level. I really enjoyed going in the recording studio with him. It wasn’t about whether or not the song we were working on was something I would want to go home and listen to. That’s not why I was there. I was there because he was very good at being able to reach inside you and bring things out of you that wouldn’t naturally be what I’d end up doing myself.” Prince accomplished that by motivating people in particular ways. Eric said, “One time, in a recording session, he told me I want you to play a solo on this song but I want you to approach it as if you just picked up the saxophone for the first day in your life. And being a huge fan of Miles Davis I related it to the same thing Miles used to tell Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter and Tony Williams. He said, I don’t pay you to play for me what you know. I pay you to play for me what you don’t know. And I would try to look at it in the same way. And those are the experiences that I treasure. But most of the time it wasn’t about what he would say but about creating that vibe. He did it in a very personal way. I worked with George Clinton on several recordings. George would create the same kind of environment but George, not being a player, was like an alchemist. He would get everybody in a room and set up a vibe and get something out of you like that. Prince was an instrumentalist, so he was more hands on, but they would both set a vibe.”

It takes more than a wide array of talents to become a generational icon; part of why Prince became one is that his oeuvre dealt with what is perhaps one of the ultimate questions: Can we have both reverence for God and fulfill the rawest of carnal desires? Can the spiritual imperative and the lustful urge co-exist in one soul? Prince had much to say on the issues of the irrepressible sexual impulse and our innate spiritual needs, as well as apathy in the face of the apocalypse. His messages fit generation X. He was talented, yes, but, crucially, he lived a life that uniquely prepared him to understand the gen X experience and wrote songs that spoke to the things we cared about—our desires, our fears, our longings, our anxieties—and that is why he became a generational icon.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 12, 2013

    Highly Recommend

    I want to first start off by saying that I read and watch anything concerning Prince. I have loved Prince since his very first album (if anyone remembers what those are). I own all of his music, even the songs that I am not that crazy about. So when I read that there was a book out and written by Toure; I knew I had to read it. And I must say that I was going to be the first to write Mr. Toure a letter if he wrote anything bad about The Purple One. However, I must now admit that this book was really a must have for my collection. Mr. Toure did a fantastic job. I have read it twice already. I even learned somethings that I did not know. My children want to read it so that they will finally understand my love for Prince. They grew up listening to him. But they must first get the book away from me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2014

    Sketchy

    Interesting theory, but not a very good job of proving it. He tends to put forth only songs/lyrics that support his concepts while ignoring lots of examples that run vounter to his theories. There are some glaring errors regarding the man's catalog and even lyrics are misquoted. Toure could really use a copy editor as well. If you are already a Prince fan, you won't find much new information. But I applaud the effort to place the oeuvre in a larger context.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2013

    Toure is a racist...nothing to see here

    Toure is a racist...nothing to see here

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  • Posted November 27, 2013

    Why did I buy this??  Skipped most of the pages trying to find s

    Why did I buy this??  Skipped most of the pages trying to find something in this book about Prince other than the author's analysis of gen x and prince song meanings.  

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2013

    Good Read

    Nothing covered that hasnt been before however Toure's view is appreciated and seems accurate. I am wondering though IF he talked to Prince at all while writing this.

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  • Posted May 27, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    By: Toure Published by: Afria Books Age Recommended: Adult Revie

    By: Toure
    Published by: Afria Books
    Age Recommended: Adult
    Reviewed By: Arlena Dean
    Rating: 5
    Book Blog For: GMTA
    Review:

    "I Would Die 4 U" by Toure was not a biography of Prince's life but rather "the description of I Would Die 4 u that this is an investigation and based on research from people that were/are in Prince's life and some that were in his innermost circle." I will say that Prince has been one of my favorites forever and finding out that Toure's new book 'analyzes Prince's lyrics in ways "that most have never actually considered which causes you to go back and play all of your old Prince stuff and listen for the subtle messages you never knew he was delivering." This book really does explain why we find Prince such a great icon for my generation. I found this novel was very well written as we can see Prince as a 'sex symbol, troubled man or whether he is a Christian or not, there is a message in it all. To truly understand this artist know as 'Prince' this would be a good read to you to understand the musical genius that this man is in the entertaining world of pop culture.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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