IBM and the Holocaust: The Strategic Alliance Between Nazi Germany and America's Most Powerful Corporation [NOOK Book]

Overview

IBM and the Holocaust is the award-winning, New York Times bestselling shocker--a million copies in print--detailing IBM's conscious co-planning and co-organizing of the Holocaust for the Nazis, all micromanaged by its president Thomas J Watson from New York and Paris. This Expanded Edition offers 37 pages of previous unpublished documents, pictures, internal company correspondence, and other archival materials to produce an even more explosive volume. Originally published to extraordinary praise in 2001, this ...
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IBM and the Holocaust: The Strategic Alliance Between Nazi Germany and America's Most Powerful Corporation

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Overview

IBM and the Holocaust is the award-winning, New York Times bestselling shocker--a million copies in print--detailing IBM's conscious co-planning and co-organizing of the Holocaust for the Nazis, all micromanaged by its president Thomas J Watson from New York and Paris. This Expanded Edition offers 37 pages of previous unpublished documents, pictures, internal company correspondence, and other archival materials to produce an even more explosive volume. Originally published to extraordinary praise in 2001, this provocative, award-winning international bestseller has stood the test of time as it chronicles the story of IBM's strategic alliance with Nazi Germany. IBM and the Holocaust provides nothing less than a chilling investigation into corporate complicity. Edwin Black's monumental research exposes how IBM and its subsidiaries helped create enabling technologies for the Nazis, step-by-step, from the identification and cataloging programs of the 1930s to the selections of the 1940s.
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Editorial Reviews

Washington Post Book World - Christopher Simpson
BEYOND DISPUTE. Black clearly demonstrates that Nazi Germany employed IBM Hollerith punch-card machines to perform critical tasks in carrying out the Holocaust and the German war effort. He goes on to document that IBM managed to profit from Hitler's state throughout its existence. ...Black establishes beyond dispute that IBM Hollerith machines significantly advanced Nazi efforts to exterminate Jewry. ...IBM and the Holocaust is a valuable contribution to our understanding of the Holocaust.
The Atlantic - Jack Beatty
SHOCKING. Thomas Watson chose to tabulate the Nazi census, to accept Hitler's medal, and to fight for control of Dehomag. And he made other equally indefensible choices in his years of doing a profitable business counting Jews for Hitler-choices that are described in IBM and the Holocaust by Edwin Black. This is a shocking book. Edwin Black has documented a sordid relationship between this great American company and the Third Reich, one that extended into the war years.
Cleveland Plain Dealer - Karen Sandstrom
EXCRUCIATING. Black makes a case that shames the IBM of the mid-20th Century. ...There will be no question... in the minds of readers that IBM officials had the ability to understand the task their machines were performing. The book succeeds as a piece of excruciatingly documented journalism.
Newsweek - Michael Hirsh
STUNNING. An explosive book... Backed by exhaustive research, Black's case is simple and stunning: that IBM facilitated the identification and roundup of millions of Jews during the 12 years of the Third Reich ... Black's evidence may be the most damning to appear yet against a corporate accomplice.
Miami Herald - Richard Pachter
EXHAUSTIVE. An exhaustively researched, highly detailed look at IBM, its history and business dealings. . . . Black’s book . . . is an ugly story, hidden for years, told by a master craftsman in a compelling way. More than just another Holocaust tale . . . it’s a chilling lesson.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016124421
  • Publisher: Dialog Press
  • Publication date: 2/16/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 592
  • Sales rank: 606,524
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Edwin Black is the award-winning, New York Times and international investigative author of 80 bestselling editions in 14 languages in 61 countries, as well as scores of newspaper and magazine articles in the leading publications of the United States, Europe and Israel. With a million books in print, his work focuses on genocide and hate, corporate criminality and corruption, governmental misconduct, academic fraud, philanthropy abuse, oil addiction, alternative energy and historical investigation. Editors have submitted Black's work nine times for Pulitzer Prize nomination, and in recent years he has been the recipient of a series of top editorial awards. He has also contributed to a number of anthologies worldwide. For his work, Black has been interviewed on hundreds of network broadcasts from Oprah, the Today Show, CNN Wolf Blitzer Reports and NBC Dateline in the US to the leading networks of Europe and Latin American. His works have been the subject of numerous documentaries, here and abroad. All of his books have been optioned by Hollywood for film, with three in active production. His latest film is the screen adaptation War Against the Weak, based on his book of the same name. Black's speaking tours include hundreds of events in dozens of cities each year, appearing at prestigious venues from the Library of Congress in Washington to the Simon Wiesenthal Institute in Los Angeles in America, and in Europe from London's British War Museum and Amsterdam's Institute for War Documentation to Munich's Carl Orff Hall.
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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 8, 2012

    Terrifying Revelations of American Corporate Complicity with Nazi Germany

    IBM and the Holocaust, written by Edwin Black, author of Nazi Nexus, The Farhud, and many other books about the Holocaust, the Nazis, Hitler and the Third Reich, is a deeply researched and terrifying revelation of the technology IBM employed using the Hollerith punched card machine, and how the Nazis used it to keep track of, and murder six million Jews. This books tells in frightening detail of how the Hollerith machine enabled the Nazis to achieve the efficiency they demanded both in its rearmament program and its war against the Jews. Black shows how IBM and its CEO, Thomas J. Watson, walked away from the war much richer and without consequence for providing the Nazis with the way to track down each and every Jew, deport them on trains that ran on time, thanks to IBM technology, and deliver them straight to the crematoriums by the millions.
    Being the head of a major corporation, Watson saw himself as just a business man fulfilling a demand of his product, along everything that went with it, to a customer, who just happened to be Hitler and the Third Reich. He considered himself above any laws or even any moral standards and obligations when he aided the enemy that the U.S. was at war with, and who was annihilating every Jew in Europe.
    Watson, like Henry Ford and others, received the Merit Cross of the German Eagle from Hitler for their help. For Watson, it was not about anti-Semetism, as with Ford, but for him, it was all about money and nothing else.
    Edwin Black has spent his life researching the Holocaust, and IBM is a horrifying example of a U.S. corporation getting rich from dealing with an enemy of our country, and not having to pay the consequences, unlike others who were involved in the Holocaust and were brought to trial for their crimes against humanity and the Jews.
    IBM's technology is even now able to keep track of each and every one of us, knowing more about us than we do ourselves, and if they were able to do what they did back then, what are they capable of now?

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  • Posted April 2, 2012

    My Hands Shake as I Read This Book I'm only a few chapters into

    My Hands Shake as I Read This Book
    I'm only a few chapters into this incredible tome, but I am so impressed with how thorough each sentence was researched and cited. I can't read too long at a time, though, because I still can't get my head around how punch cards were used to identify "undesirables" for extermination. I used to play with punch cards when I was kid--my mother brought them home from work as scrap paper and I was so intrigued by them. Now I will never think of punch cards again without this heinous picture of how they were used to slaughter innocents. Bravo to the Edwin Black's bravery to pursue this investigation and to his parents for their bravery to survive the Nazi hell! Death could not keep them in the grave!

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  • Posted June 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Astonishing

    I originally read an excerpt of this book in Friedman's 'Secret Histories' about a year ago, and I was blown away. This is one of those books that everyone should read if they're up to it. I think some people would like to stay in la-la land about subjects like this, but if you've ever been interested in alternative history that hasn't been generalized into a meta-narrative...here ya go. I'd also recommend Friedman's 'Secret Histories' for more excerpts and books to look into.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2005

    Riveting!

    The (then) President of IBM is clearly the foundation of what capitalism is made of. It is difficult for me to imagine one so driven to succeed as Mr. Watson. As Nazi Germany expands, IBM's interest lies solely with IBM.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2002

    Lots of implications and not enough convincing evidence. . .

    Perhaps the saddest most troubling message from Black's IBM and the Holocaust is that IBM did not act alone in enabling the Third Reich to carry out its terrible deeds. Businesses around the world, including many prominent businesses in the United States, directly and indirectly helped to empower Hitler's Germany with full knowledge of the massive execution and murder taking place. That IBM didn't act alone doesn't absolve it from guilt. Black's book isn't so important because of what his evidence demonstrates, but rather of what it eludes to: that much of the world (and especially IBM) acted, or failed to act in light of full knowledge that people were dying on a scale unprecedented in human history. In fact, according to Black IBM helped to facilitate the Nazi's ability to ascertain the number of Jews in Europe and then continued to aid in their horrific endeavor. I'm not sure all the evidence is there to make such an accusation, but the evidence presented by Black and others seems certainly to allude to it. Black makes his argument through the combining of documents that he says are purposely vague and unassuming in their independence, but when united spell out clearly IBM's duplicity. In my opinion Black never really demonstrates this to the point where there is not a reasonable doubt. Examples throughout his book seem wanting, but they do seem to lead to an unclear implication that IBM certainly knew something. Probably the most damning evidence presented by Black lies with that which demonstrates that IBM struggled to maintain control (succeeding much of the time) of most of its subsidiary operations throughout Europe before and during the war. This by itself implicates IBM of at the very least operating purely in its own interest and completely disregarding the human tragedy caused by the application of its technology.

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    Posted February 2, 2009

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    Posted June 1, 2012

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    Posted May 18, 2011

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    Posted January 20, 2012

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    Posted May 29, 2009

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