Ice Age Tracker's Guide

Ice Age Tracker's Guide

by Martin Ursell, Adrian Lister
     
 

If you were exploring in the Ice Age, would you be able to recognize the tracks of a sabre tooth tiger, the droppings of a woolly rhinoceros or the call of the giant deer? If not, this unique book would be the essential guide to have with you for quick, on-the-spot reference.For anyone fascinated by long-extinct creatures, this is a guide to how twelve Ice-Age

Overview

If you were exploring in the Ice Age, would you be able to recognize the tracks of a sabre tooth tiger, the droppings of a woolly rhinoceros or the call of the giant deer? If not, this unique book would be the essential guide to have with you for quick, on-the-spot reference.For anyone fascinated by long-extinct creatures, this is a guide to how twelve Ice-Age animals would have lived, eaten and hunted. Vivid illustrations are accompanied by notes on size, body shape fur, food, behaviour and the sort of habitat in which you might have found each animal. Additional notes and illustrations indicate 'signs' to look out for when tracking each animal such as dung and tracks. And there are even warnings to prepare would-be trackers for the dangers that some ice-age animals presented.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Where could you spot it? What signs does it leave behind? What should you beware of? British paleontologist Lister (yes, he's actually excavated Ice Age mammals) and noted British illustrator Ursell have collaborated to bring would-be trackers an unusual look at some spectacular ancient animals. Look first at Ursell's sketches on the endpapers; then turn the pages for his ink and watercolor paintings of Ice Age creatures in their habitats. Especially striking is the snarling marsupial lion with his spotted coat and pointed incisors, perched on a branch with a flaming-red volcano sky for background. But they're all exciting and beautifully realized from the snub-trunked South American litoptern to the giant deer with the largest antlers ever grown and the huge, feathered, long-necked moa. Each spread helps creature-spotters identify their quarry with notes describing size, body shape, behavior, food, and signs of their passing. For some, there's a special warning: Look out for the glyptodont's tail! "It can be used as a club to wallop intruders." A beautifully designed watercolor map tells seekers where to find each creature—woolly rhinos, for example, lived in Europe and northern Asia—while a final spread in this outstanding field guide offers more information for determined trackers. Readers drawn to these intriguing beasts (and lovers of the Ice Age animated films) might also enjoy Cheryl Bardoe's Mammoths and Mastodons (Abrams, 2010) and Barbara Hehner and Mark Hallett's Ice Age Cave Bear (Crown, 2002). Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
Gr 3–5—"Hunters" of Ice Age fauna will find the tawny pages in this "guide" a trove of pointers for identifying a round dozen of predators and prey. What does a giant ground sloth's poop look like? Just how big is a dwarf elephant? And where might one come across a marsupial lion? Fact boxes add a few details, and "Warning!" boxes advise wariness of anti-human behaviors. Size, shape, food, fur (if any), locations, and other tidbits are scattered about the watercolor and ink illustrations, and are reinforced by two pages of solid paragraphs of text on each creature. Lister, a respected British paleontologist, writes with authority in this lighthearted, informational work. A double-page global distribution map uses color coding to pinpoint specific locations for the species described. While not as wildly popular as T. rex or Argentineosaurus, critters like saber-tooth cats and woolly rhinos can give them a run for their money. And then there's that Litoptern....—Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews

A picture-book field guide to 11 ice-age mammals (including the armadillo-like glyptodont) and one ice-age bird (the moa) by a well-known paleontologist provides a quite serviceable introduction to these extraordinary creatures for younger readers. It is neatly organized to address the most frequently asked questions: Each animal is given its own two pages, with geographic and environmental habitats,physical and behavioral description and intriguing facts. Ursell's detailed ink-and-watercolor illustrations are full of humor but offer a clear glimpse of what these creatures must have looked like, though it's too bad there are no size comparisons for most of these creatures with more familiar animals or objects.The facts are delivered in the present tense ("Woolly Mammoths live in groups of 20 or 30..."), with more detail about the actual dates of emergence and extinction given on a two-page habitat-range map as well as in very detailed paragraphs on each creature in the "more information" pages.(Nonfiction. 5-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781845077181
Publisher:
Frances Lincoln Children's Books
Publication date:
08/24/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 11.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

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