Ice Cream: The Full Scoop

Ice Cream: The Full Scoop

by Gail Gibbons
     
 

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Cool and smooth and sweet, ice cream has long been a favourite treat. It cools you off when it's hot and is too delicious to resist even in cold weather. How did it get to be so scrumptious? Best-selling author/illustrator Gail Gibbons dishes out the latest scoop on ice cream production. Ice cream has come a long way from its humble beginnings as a mixture of snow,

Overview

Cool and smooth and sweet, ice cream has long been a favourite treat. It cools you off when it's hot and is too delicious to resist even in cold weather. How did it get to be so scrumptious? Best-selling author/illustrator Gail Gibbons dishes out the latest scoop on ice cream production. Ice cream has come a long way from its humble beginnings as a mixture of snow, milk, and rice. Gail Gibbons details the many firsts in ice cream history, from the earliest ice cream crank to the original waffle cone. Children's mouths will be watering as they follow ice cream's journey from farm to factory to freezer.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
I always thought my mother invented "snow cream" (clean snow with sweetened flavored milk drizzled over it)--the author has (yet again) given us the definitive explanation of the cold, sweet treat called ice cream. Some people believe that the Chinese mixed snow, milk, and rice together as long as 3,000 years ago (not my mom!). In this worthy addition to the body of explanatory literature, readers are greeted, on the very first page, with a scene of people enjoying various forms of ice cream in a brightly colored ice cream parlor. This scene prepares them to learn about the entire history of ice cream, its developmental stages (recipe and processing changes), and the cultural influences that have shaped today's frozen delights. Gibbons takes us from cow (with her usual clear explanatory pictures) to the ice cream factory, from the grocery store to people eating their favorite kinds of ice cream. Along the way insets remind us of various facts: credit for the pasteurization process goes to Louis Pasteur; the three common container sizes (pint, quart, half gallon) for ice cream; and explanations of various words, such as "vendor" which means "someone who sells something." The word comes into play as she describes the invention of the ice cream cone at the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair, when an ice cream vendor ran out of paper cups for holding scoops of ice cream. A near-by waffle seller offered some of his waffles to create cones to hold the scoops. Lots of information about ice cream is included and visually depicted--so much as to create the need for a quick trip to the local market! Did you know that vanilla is still the favorite flavor followed by chocolate? Sunday is still the favoriteday for purchasing ice cream--the spelling of Ice Cream Sundae was changed from the original "Sunday" when people began eating them on other days of the week. Have you consumed the American average of 15 quarts this year? If not, grab a spoon for a scoop, a bar, a cone, or a straw for an ice cream soda! 2006, Holiday House, Ages 3 to 7.
—Sheilah Egan
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-Ice cream is easy to love, but it has not always been easy to make. Like spaghetti, its origins date back to Marco Polo and his famous trip to China. Gibbons explains how this favorite food developed from flavored ice to the creamy dessert we know today, describes the invention and workings of the ice-cream maker, follows the journey from cow to factory to grocery-store shelves, and mentions the innovative creation of the cone. All of these details combine to pay homage to what is arguably the most popular treat on the planet. The narrative is simple and direct and the cartoon illustrations are colorful and cheerful. Potentially unfamiliar vocabulary is defined within the text or on the same page, and all diagrams are clearly labeled. There is a lot going on in this book, but the layout guides readers through the wealth of information.-Kara Schaff Dean, Needham Public Library, MA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
At long last, the prolific Gibbons weighs in with a characteristic treatment of this ever-popular topic. She opens with the supposed invention of iced milk 3,000 years ago and closes by warning readers not to eat too much of the stuff (the nearest thing to any cautionary or nutritional information here). In between, she takes a visiting class from dairy farm to modern factory, with side jaunts to hand-cranked ice cream, an ice cream social and the invention of the cone. The prose is, as always, relentlessly matter-of-fact, the cartoon illustrations both colorful and easy to follow. Though even smaller libraries will be able to dish up similar titles by others, Gibbons's fan base will guarantee this one's popularity. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823421558
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
12/28/2007
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
273,819
Product dimensions:
9.80(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.10(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Gail gibbons has published fifty distinguished nonfiction titles with Holiday House including Apples and The Berry Book. Apples was lauded as "the perfect pick for the perennial fall apple-book requests, "by School Library Journal. Before creating children's books, she worked for NBC television. She lives in Vermont. Visit her on the Web at www.gailgibbons.com.

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