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Ice Girls: What Managers Can Learn From The Story Of The Little Match Girl By One Who Was There
     

Ice Girls: What Managers Can Learn From The Story Of The Little Match Girl By One Who Was There

by Dan McLaughlin
 

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Nominated Best Storytelling 2009 Just Plan Folks!

Thanks to Hans Christian Anderson, you already know the story of the Little Match Girl who froze to death selling matches on a street-corner on New Year's Eve. But what about the managers who woke up the next morning (their day off!) to deal with the mess? How did they get in the situation in the first place?

Overview

Nominated Best Storytelling 2009 Just Plan Folks!

Thanks to Hans Christian Anderson, you already know the story of the Little Match Girl who froze to death selling matches on a street-corner on New Year's Eve. But what about the managers who woke up the next morning (their day off!) to deal with the mess? How did they get in the situation in the first place? More importantly, how did they get out of it? What is the role "Brainstorming Sessions" and is there really no such thing as a bad idea? Is it possible to be TOO fawning to a boss? How can blaming foreigners for one's problems solve one's crisis?

What more COULD there be in a novel so slim (and cheap)?

Well, in addition to all these thought-provoking notions, ICE Girls also considers:

The Princess and the Pea as seen by the Prince who ends up married to a lady whose only qualification is her innate ability to complain about the tiniest little thing. Is the ability to complain the best thing to look for in a mate?

The Red Shoes as seen by the Deity who hacks off the feet of dancers. Not necessarily just a critique of modern dance, but what kind of religion does such a Deity engender?

The Emperor's New Clothes as seen by frustrated revolutionaries who convince the Emperor to wear his new clothes in public. Is it possible for intellectual revolutionaries to over-think?

The Story of the Steadfast Tin Soldier as seen by the of the object of his adoration, the one-legged ballerina. This, one of the first romantic-stalker tales asks if being pursued by a lunatic is the carefree romp as portrayed in the media.


All of these questions are answered in "ICE Girls: What Managers Can Learn from the Story of the Little Match Girl by One Who Was There."

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012638991
Publisher:
CreateSpace
Publication date:
02/11/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
333 KB

Meet the Author

Dan McLaughlin was born in Hollywood during halftime of a Rams Colts game. Although the Rams scored a touchdown soon after his birth to tie the game, the Colts then scored 17 points to win. This, along with multi-decade stints at UCLA and as a government bureaucrat, has given Dan an appreciation for the subtle and sometimes capricious agency of action and words.

Among his philosophical influences he cites Thomas Kuhn, David Springhorn, Paul Feyerabend, the Reduced Shakespeare Company and Bullwinkle the Moose. When not working as the local history reference librarian at the Pasadena Public Library, Dan can be found working merrily in the garden, pacing nervously during any UCLA game where the lead is less than 25 points, or walking sedately the beloved puppies with his even more beloved honey, Vendi.

Dan has written three books and one musical. His latest work is “Gott Mit Uns,” a novel that tells the story of an 8 1/2 foot penguin, who is a goddess, who is pursued by two people, who are bureaucrats, through today's America. Dan has also written “Pass the Damn Salt, Please” a novel which explores the importance of language and politeness in relationships told entirely in dialogue; “ICE Girls” an award winning novella which examines the story of the Little Match Girl from the point of view of management; and the award winning musical “Oh No, Not Emily!” an operetta in which a modern fake Emily Dickinson poem is sold to a post-modern English Department.

Before that he and Mark Sellin were the comedy phenomenon “2 Guys from the 70’s” where they served to remind people of the emotional honesty of the 1970’s. Before that, again with Mark and several other friends, Dan wrote, directed and acted in several plays at the Renaissance Pleasure Faire in Southern California, including their greatest hit “Ye Olde Tale of Goode King Arthur.” Also from that era he created radio play versions of the Trojan Horse “The Big Horsey Ride” and the Odyssey “Going Home and Getting Lucky.”

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