Icebergs and Glaciers

Icebergs and Glaciers

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by Seymour Simon
     
 

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The frozen rivers and sheets of ice known as glaciers can move as slowly as a few inches a year, yet they are a powerful force shaping the earth beneath and around them. Breathtaking photographs mark this dramatic introduction to a beautiful yet frozen world of mountaintops and polar regions.

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Overview

The frozen rivers and sheets of ice known as glaciers can move as slowly as a few inches a year, yet they are a powerful force shaping the earth beneath and around them. Breathtaking photographs mark this dramatic introduction to a beautiful yet frozen world of mountaintops and polar regions.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Perhaps Simon's nonfiction for children is so successful because he gets readers involved in the environment around them, with both arresting and accessible facts. In this new book, he tells readers that the largest glacier ever measured is 200 miles long and 60 miles across; but it's also ``bigger than the state of Vermont or the country of Belgium.'' And those glaciers move. Simon also covers how ice fields form and become mobile, and why they are dangerous. Readers who put icebergs and glaciers in the same category as dinosaursfrom a time long agolearn of the relatively recent tragedy of the Titanic, and that icebergs someday may be used as fresh water sources in deserts. The facts are coupled with clear, full-color photographs; the correlation between text and illustration is direct and obvious, making captions unnecessary. Simon suggests that readers take a look at landscapes around themthey may just see a place where a glacier has passed by. Ages 48. (March)
Children's Literature - Sheree Van Vreede
For most of us, it is hard to believe that ice and snow cover almost one-tenth of the Earth all year round. Even harder to believe is that there was a time when ice and snow covered most of the U.S. What is it like in Antartica and parts of Alaska, Greenland, Canada, and Iceland, where glaciers always exist? How do they form? Where do icebergs come from? Will the ice age ever return? This insightful book answers these questions and more. Beginning with the description of the snowflake, the book explains how a glacier moves, how scientists study them, and how icebergs appear. Ice caps, rock flour, and ice sheets are also discussed. Photographs on every page capture some of the most amazing sights on Earth. 1999 (orig.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6 This treatment of glaciers and icebergs is beautifully illustrated, and the text is clear and well-written. Simon describes the physical composition and properties of glacial ice, including new findings of how glaciers move: either by sliding on films of water or by internal flows``creeping.'' He presents facts at a basic level, without much explanation or detail, and uses fairly simple vocabulary. Every spread is illustrated with beautiful color photographs, including one computer-colored photo of Iceland that shows temperature variations. Type is large, with lots of white space. In comparison, Tangborn's Glaciers (Crowell, 1965; o.p.) is illustrated with expository drawings, has a lower vocabulary level, and discusses mostly the effects of glaciers (rather than the process). The Nixons' Glaciers (Dodd, 1980) and Robin's Glaciers and Ice Sheets (Watts, 1984), which are for older readers, have much more information. This one would almost be worth adding to collections for the spectacular illustrations alone, but Simon's lively and informative text makes the book even more impressive. Jonathan Betz-Zall, Sno-Isle Regional Library System, Marysville, Wash.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688167059
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/28/1999
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
731,124
Product dimensions:
9.93(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.00(d)
Age Range:
6 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Seymour Simon has been called "the dean of the [children's science book] field" by the New York Times. He has written more than 250 books for young readers and has received the American Association for the Advancement of Science/Subaru Lifetime Achievement Award for his lasting contribution to children's science literature, the Science Books & Films Key Award for Excellence in Science Books, the Empire State Award for excellence in literature for young people, and the Educational Paperback Association Jeremiah Ludington Award. He and his wife, Liz, live in Great Neck, New York. You can visit him online at www.seymoursimon.com, where you can read "Seymour Science Blog" and download a free four-page teacher guide to accompany this book, putting it in context with Common Core objectives. Many of Seymour's award-winning books are also available as ebooks.

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