Icebound in Antarctica

Icebound in Antarctica

by David Lewis, Mimi George
     
 

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Dr David Lewis tells of his latest expedition in which he sailed to Antarctica in the winter to be intentionally icebound. Much more than a sailor's tale of a voyage of exploration, it is a revelation of the human spirit under duress. On 14 November 1982, David Lewis, Mimi George, and four others set sail from Sydney, Australia, in a 65-foot steel-hulled yacht, the… See more details below

Overview

Dr David Lewis tells of his latest expedition in which he sailed to Antarctica in the winter to be intentionally icebound. Much more than a sailor's tale of a voyage of exploration, it is a revelation of the human spirit under duress. On 14 November 1982, David Lewis, Mimi George, and four others set sail from Sydney, Australia, in a 65-foot steel-hulled yacht, the Dick Smith Explorer, on a privately funded expedition to the southern polar ice-cap. Their mission: to overwinter in the frozen Antarctic wastes, study environmental hazards and wildlife, and assess the effects of total isolation on six former strangers. In a lively and candid narrative the authors take us behind the scenes of polar expedition—the fitting out of the ship, selection of crew, navigation through pack-ice and monster icebergs, tagging seals, studying penguins and other birdlife, sledging in blizzards and battling frostbite. Behind it all is the haunting beauty of Antarctica—the last great uncharted wilderness. This is the land of Amundsen and Scott, of Shackleton and Fuchs—a land beset with dangers, yet which still irresistibly exerts its thrall. Lewis and George's fascinating account of their adventures brings every detail alive.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Lewis, world sailor and writer (Icebird), conceived of a research expedition to Antarctica: a frozen-in ship would serve as base for studies of sea ice and wildlife while the team would master the techniques of ice sledding and camping. Anthropologist George would examine stress among the participantsa situation comparable to space stations with people isolated in a hostile environment. Three men and one woman joined Lewis and George for the 16-month expedition, sailing from Australia on a 65-foot motor schooner, the Dick Smith Explorer. They were strangers; unlike close-knit climbing expeditions, they had few common interests or goals. From the beginning, there was discord. Ultimately, one individual had to be flown out by helicopter when his behavior threatened the group's safety. Despite the stresses, the expedition achieved its scientific goals and returned safely. In an afterword, Lewis is sharply critical of U.S. policy in Antarctica that permits only official visitors; he advocates private projects. This is a gripping story of adventure spiced by interpersonal conflict. Portions of the book previously appeared in National Geographic. Photos. (April)
Library Journal
Following Ice Bird, an account of Lewis's first solo voyage to Antartica in 1972, this book discusses the sexagenarian and his five-person crew's expedition there to install their small boat into the pack ice for testing its efficacy as a winter base. A number of scientific experiments were to be conducted, including gathering data for arctic exploration and space station design during the 16-month expedition, but the interpersonal problems, as recounted in the book, dominated the trip. One participant characterizes the expedition as ``lacklustre,'' an assessment that also best describes the book.Jerry Maioli, Western Lib. Network, Olympia, Wash.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781742699837
Publisher:
Allen & Unwin Pty., Limited
Publication date:
06/01/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
5 MB

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