Icons and Idiots: Straight Talk on Leadership

Icons and Idiots: Straight Talk on Leadership

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by Bob Lutz
     
 

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When Bob Lutz retired from General Motors in 2010, after an unparalleled forty-seven-year career in the auto industry, he was one of the most respected leaders in American business. He had survived all kinds of managers over those decades: tough and timid, analytical and irrational, charismatic and antisocial, and some who seemed to shift frequently among all…  See more details below

Overview

When Bob Lutz retired from General Motors in 2010, after an unparalleled forty-seven-year career in the auto industry, he was one of the most respected leaders in American business. He had survived all kinds of managers over those decades: tough and timid, analytical and irrational, charismatic and antisocial, and some who seemed to shift frequently among all those traits. His experiences made him an expert on leadership, every bit as much as he was an expert on cars and trucks. Now Lutz is revealing the leaders-good, bad, and ugly-who made the strongest impression on him throughout his career. Icons and Idiots is a collection of shocking and often hilarious true stories and the lessons Lutz drew from them. From enduring the sadism of a Marine Corps drill instructor, to working with a washed-up alcoholic, to taking over the reins from a convicted felon, he reflects on the complexities of all-too-human leaders. No textbook or business school course can fully capture their idiosyncrasies, foibles and weaknesses - which can make or break companies in the real world. Lutz shows that we can learn just as much from the most stubborn, stupid, and corrupt leaders as we can from the inspiring geniuses. The result is a powerful and entertaining guide for any aspiring leader.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Auto industry veteran Lutz (Car Guys and Bean Counters) held senior leadership positions at four of the world’s top automakers, including a stint as vice-chairman of General Motors. Here, he offers a fresh twist on leadership lessons, drawing on the positive and negative examples of real-life leaders he encountered over 47 years in the car business. In concise, snappy, often hilarious chapters, Lutz profiles household names like Lee Iacocca and well-known CEOs like Bob Eaton, who ran Chrysler, but most chapters are devoted to rank and lesser known executives he served under throughout his career, including Eberhard Von Kuenheim, who went on to “transform BMW from a tiny, regional auto company into a global luxury-car powerhouse.” Lutz’s experiences in the auto industry will delight car lovers, but even the uninitiated will likely be amused by his lively prose. His vivid attention to detail brings each leader to life, illustrating his or her individual complexities with stories of foibles, political incorrectness, and praiseworthy moments that will draw sighs of recognition from readers who have worked in hierarchical corporations large or small. Agent: Wes Neff, LeighCo Inc. (June)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101608081
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/04/2013
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
287,376
File size:
545 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

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Meet the Author

Bob Lutz held senior leadership positions at GM, Ford, Chrysler, and BMW over the course of an unparalleled forty-seven-year career, culminating in his vice chairmanship of General Motors from 2011 to 2010. He is the bestselling author of Guts: 8 Laws of Business from One of the Most Innovative Business Leaders of Our Time.

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Icons and Idiots: Straight Talk on Leadership 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
We have all had bad bosses, but most of us don't write books about them. Bob Lutz, however, can't seem to let things go. While there are some amusing anecdotes, I could not help feeling that his purpose was to expose the weaknesses of everyone he has ever known. While this reads quickly, it is more of the author's ego trip than any revealing lesson in management.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked the author's style. He tells about his working experiences and how those people affected his life, good, bad or indifferent, which made him the great business man today.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One day a man came to a house and he went down to a basement and he saw a ghost at the corner and he went away but then the door shut and the man was gone and his shoes were still there and man was calling his friends but they couldn't hear him so he was looking looking and fianly his friends saw the basement and they open the door and they saw their friend in there and friend thought they shut the door on him. THE END