I'd Really Like to Eat a Child

( 3 )

Overview

A scrawny little crocodile wants the opportunity to bite off more than he can chew. He's tired of bananas; today he'd like to eat a child. But he's smaller than he thinks, and the little girl he chooses for his first meal puts him in his place—she picks him up and tickles his tummy! The little crocodile is going to have to eat a lot of bananas and grow a lot bigger before he can add children to his menu! Simple yet hilarious artwork brings this droll story to life.
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Overview

A scrawny little crocodile wants the opportunity to bite off more than he can chew. He's tired of bananas; today he'd like to eat a child. But he's smaller than he thinks, and the little girl he chooses for his first meal puts him in his place—she picks him up and tickles his tummy! The little crocodile is going to have to eat a lot of bananas and grow a lot bigger before he can add children to his menu! Simple yet hilarious artwork brings this droll story to life.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When an adorable crocodile named Achilles scorns his mother's bananas and makes the startling announcement that gives the book its title, young readers may experience a frissonof tension, since they clearly wouldn't want to become a crocodile's breakfast themselves. In de Monfreid's double-page spreads, which suggest the horizons of prowling reptiles, Mama and Papa Crocodile proffer sausage, then chocolate cake in an effort to distract Achilles from his purportedly inappropriate craving. But Achilles heads for the river, where he discovers a girl alone on the bank. "Yippee! Finally, I'm going to eat a child," he thinks. "He crept up slowly and bared his beautiful teeth . . . " Achilles, next to the girl, barely reaches her knee; even the "RAAH" that comes out of his mouth is pint-sized. "A teeny-tiny crocodile!" she exclaims. "He's awfully cute!" Humiliated, Achilles slinks home to munch on bananas, vowing to grow big enough and strong enough to achieve his goal. The appetizing mixture of domestic breakfast concerns and fierce child-eating monsters will leave children hungry for more. "I'd really like to read that book," parents may hear them say. Ages 3-6. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Every morning young Achilles eats the bananas his Mama Crocodile brings him. But one day Achilles decides he would prefer a child instead. At first his Mama and Papa Crocodile try to distract him with a beautiful chocolate cake, but Achilles turns it down and goes for a swim. By the river he sees a little girl. Baring his teeth, he prepares to attain his goal. From the illustration, however, we can see with a smile that the girl is much larger than the foolhardy Achilles. Thinking him scrawny, she picks him up, tickles him, and tosses him into the river. Hungrier than ever, Achilles rushes home, determined now to eat enough bananas to grow big enough to eat a child for sure. If readers do not take his desire literally, the tale is great fun, enhanced by de Monfreid's deceptively simple colored drawings, filled with comic appeal. The stage is set with a few banana trees, distant huts, and a meandering stream. Most of the space is devoted to the crocodile family, bunches of bananas, and the interaction between Achilles and the girl. Despite his sharp teeth and determined belligerence, Achilles is still an appealing youngster.
Kirkus Reviews
Achilles the crocodile is adored by his parents. They bring him bunches of bananas to eat so he will grow up big and strong. One day, though, Achilles tires of bananas and decides he'd rather eat a child. His mother tells him children don't grow on trees, and she only has bananas for him. His father tries to get him to eat a sausage from town. Achilles's parents even make him a splendid chocolate cake, but he still wants to eat a child. Leaving his parents in tears, he heads off for a swim. There by the river sits a child! Achilles attacks. She picks him up, tickles his belly and tosses him in the river. Achilles knows just what to do: Go home and eat lots of bananas in order to grow big enough to eat a child. The slightly grisly story might not appeal to everyone, but de Monfried's Feiffer-esque watercolors most certainly will. The crocs are expressive, and the dark-skinned girl is adorably self-confident. On the whole, a nice addition to storytimes about finicky eaters. (Picture book. 3-5)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375837616
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 4/24/2007
  • Series: Picture Book Series
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 642,894
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.42 (w) x 8.36 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Meet the Author

Sylviane Donnio began writing her first children's book at age eight, and stopped after about a dozen lines, promising herself to try again when she was bigger. After studying public law and becoming the mother of three children, she has kept the promise she made to herself. I'd Really Like to Eat a Child, originally published in France, is her first book for the American audience. She lives in France.

Dorothée de Monfreid began to write and illustrate her ideas with colored pencils back in grade school. Now that she is bigger, she makes her career as an author-illustrator, writing stories published in France about cats, bunnies, elephants, stinky monsters, and even cake. She lives in France.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2008

    A reviewer

    an adult with an affinity for children's books - was randomly loking through titles and thought it was rather bizarre -offputting and quite scary a title for a children's book---picked it up and read through it and found it quite humorous and cute - lends itself to the finicky nature of children.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 7, 2014

    Chuckles and Fun

    The alligator's child-like point of view is totally endearing. Mom and Dad's advice is ignored at first and the alligator has to learn his lesson himself. No children are harmed in the book! (no readers will be harmed unless they laugh too much and fall off their chair)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    This is a horrible book. I hate the story. The illustrations are

    This is a horrible book. I hate the story. The illustrations are cute but this is too scary for kids.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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