Identifying Marks: Race, Gender, and the Marked Body in Nineteenth-Century America

Overview


What we know of the marked body in nineteenth-century American literature and culture often begins with The Scarlet Letter's Hester Prynne and ends with Moby Dick's Queequeg. This study looks at the presence of marked men and women in a more challenging array of canonical and lesser-known works, including exploration narratives, romances, and frontier novels. Jennifer Putzi shows how tattoos, scars, and brands can function both as stigma and as emblem of healing and survival, thus blurring the borderline between...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $24.35   
  • New (3) from $24.35   
  • Used (2) from $52.44   
Sending request ...

Overview


What we know of the marked body in nineteenth-century American literature and culture often begins with The Scarlet Letter's Hester Prynne and ends with Moby Dick's Queequeg. This study looks at the presence of marked men and women in a more challenging array of canonical and lesser-known works, including exploration narratives, romances, and frontier novels. Jennifer Putzi shows how tattoos, scars, and brands can function both as stigma and as emblem of healing and survival, thus blurring the borderline between the biological and social, the corporeal and spiritual.

Examining such texts as Typee, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Captivity of the Oatman Girls, The Morgesons, Iola Leroy, and Contending Forces, Putzi relates the representation of the marked body to significant events, beliefs, or cultural shifts, including tattooing and captivity, romantic love, the patriarchal family, and abolition and slavery. Her particular focus is on both men and women of color, as well as white women-in other words, bodies that did not signify personhood in the nineteenth century and thus by their very nature were grotesque. Complicating the discourse on agency, power, and identity, these texts reveal a surprisingly complex array of representations of and responses to the marked body--some that are a product of essentialist thinking about race and gender identities and some that complicate, critique, or even rebel against conventional thought.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Identifying Marks is a clearly written, lively, and nuanced book. Putzi's style is one that manages to clarify and complicate simultaneously—no easy task in academic writing today. This book will appeal to both expert scholars and graduate students."--Carolyn Sorisio, author of Fleshing Out America: Race, Gender, and the Politics of the Body in American Literature, 1833-1879

"This book will make significant differences for critics of nineteenth-century U.S literature and history; it will also appeal to scholars who work on identity politics through attention to race and gender as dynamic and historically constructed products of nineteenth-century U.S. culture."--Shirley Samuels, author of Facing America: Iconography and the Civil War

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780820343440
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press
  • Publication date: 6/1/2012
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.70 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author


Jennifer Putzi is an associate professor of English and women's studies at the College of William and Mary.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: "Carved in Flesh"
Chapter 1. Capturing Identity in Ink: Tattooing and the White Captive
Chapter 2. "Burning into the Bone": Romantic Love and the Marked Woman
Chapter 3. "Tattooed Still": The Inscription of Female Agency
Chapter 4. "The Skin of an American Slave": The Mark of African American Manhood in Abolitionist Literature
Chapter 5. "Raising the Stigma": African American Women and the Corporeal Legacy of Slavery
Epilogue: Tattooed Ladies
Notes
Works Cited
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)