Identity Poetics: Race, Class, and the Lesbian-Feminist Roots of Queer Theory

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$26.60
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$19.95
(Save 28%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 82%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $5.00   
  • New (2) from $13.98   
  • Used (7) from $5.00   

Overview

"Queer theory," asserts Linda Garber, "alternately buries and vilifies lesbian feminism, missing its valuable insights and ignoring its rich contributions." Rejecting the either/or choice between lesbianism and queer theory, she favors an inclusive approach that defies current factionalism. In an eloquent challenge to the privileging of queer theory in the academy, Garber calls for recognition of the historical -- and intellectually significant -- role of lesbian poets as theorists of lesbian identity and activism.

The connections, Garber shows, are most clearly seen when looking at the pivotal work of working-class lesbians/lesbians of color whose articulations of multiple, simultaneous identity positions and activist politics both belong to lesbian feminism and presage queer theory. Identity Poetics includes a critical overview of recent historical writing about the women's and lesbian-feminist movements of the 1970s; discussions of the works of Judy Grahn, Pat Parker, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Gloria Anzaldúa; and, finally, a chapter on the rise and hegemony of queer theory within lesbigay studies.

Columbia University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Bonnie Zimmerman

A provocative and sophisticated book that challenges the presumed opposition between lesbian feminism and queer theory and rethinks orthodox notions about identity politics.

Gay and Lesbian Review

Identitiy Poetics is a thoughtful, provocative, and engaging book. Careful to aknowledge the ideas of others, Garber sets a wonderful tone for her arguements, one of allied scholarship rather than academic crossfire.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Linda Garber is associate professor in the department of English and the Program for the Study of Women and Gender at Santa Clara University. She is the editor of Tilting the Tower: Lesbians/Teaching/Queer Subjects and the author of articles on lesbian literary criticism and lesbian studies.

Columbia University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: Race, Class, and Generations1. The Social Construction of Lesbian Feminism2. Putting the Word Dyke on the Map: Judy Grahn3. "I Have a Dream Too'': Pat Parker4. "High Over the Halfway Between Your World and Mine'': Audre Lorde5. An Uncommonly Queer Reading: Adrienne Rich6. "Caught in the Crossfire Between Camps'': Gloria Anzaldúa7. Around 1991: The Rise of Queer Theory and the Lesbian IntertextAfterward, March: June 24, 2000, San FranciscoWorks Cited

Columbia University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2003

    Not your grandfather's lesbian feminism

    Garber offers a refreshing challenge to the often dismissive terms in which queer theory portrays feminism and lesbian feminism in particular. This is an accessible and persuasive argument that puts working-class lesbians and lesbians of color front and center. I think this book is a perfect fit for women's studies and lgbt studies classes. It would work well in American literature classes too, as well as US history surveys or seminars on protest movements of the 1960s and 70s. (The accessibility of the writing means that it is not just for classroom use or bookworms, though!)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)