Idlewild

Idlewild

4.3 9
by OutKast
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

It's hard to believe that OutKast has been around for more than 12 years -- a virtual eternity in hip-hop circles. But the Atlanta duo remain relevant through constant revolution and reinvention. In 2003, their galvanizing double disc, Speakerboxxx/The Love Below, marked what seemed an insurmountable creative apex

Overview

It's hard to believe that OutKast has been around for more than 12 years -- a virtual eternity in hip-hop circles. But the Atlanta duo remain relevant through constant revolution and reinvention. In 2003, their galvanizing double disc, Speakerboxxx/The Love Below, marked what seemed an insurmountable creative apex for Big Boi and Andre 3000, yet the pair continue to stretch the boundaries of hip-hop with their follow-up, Idlewild. Despite being billed as an official album, the project primarily serves as an admirable musical counterpart to Kast's theatrical release of the same name, set in the jazzy 1930s. Keeping in line with the film's era, Dre kicks his vaudeville-singing act in high gear. Mr. 3000's vocal twang and charismatic flair swing best on the juke jointin' "Idlewild Blue (Don'tchu Worry About Me)" and the Prince-reminiscent "PJ & Rooster." Big, on the other hand, raps with exquisite detail and confidence throughout, and the delectable "Peaches" and the autobiographical "The Train" are lyrical standouts. Although the partners in rhyme spend more mic time apart than not -- continuing to fuel breakup rumors -- whenever they converge on the same track, the results are magical, as on "Hollywood Divorce" and "Mighty 'O'." Idlewild might have resonated even more strongly with more such collaborative moments, but truly, separate but equal never sounded so good. Anslem Samuel

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Andy Kellman
A lot happened to OutKast between the moment they began to think about making a movie and the release of Idlewild. In 1998, no studio would back the movie they were plotting. Fast-forward eight years, past a fourth successive classic album, a double-disc blockbuster, and countless breakup rumors, as well as moonlighting gigs involving supporting actor roles and a successful dog kennel. Along the way, OutKast's first movie took on an entirely different shape, from Aquemini to Idlewild, and the duo attained enough star power to gain the support of HBO and Universal. After a series of delays with its soundtrack, Idlewild reached theaters in August 2006. Set in the prohibition era, Big Boi plays a speakeasy owner, while Dré is the relatively introverted piano-playing son of a mortician. These roles are no stretch, and they cross paths in only a handful of scenes; this all befits the together-but-separate presentation the duo has maintained for a few years. That presentation holds true throughout Idlewild's soundtrack, which doubles as the sixth OutKast album. Big Boi and André 1936 share little space on a disc that's not so much a series of misfires as it's filled with shots that reach their targets, albeit softly and with little trace of impact. Rich with color and energy, mischievous asides, and biting observations, the album presents fresh ideas every couple of minutes. However, at the same time, it just keeps on going, and even its highlights fall short of OutKast's past and fail to transcend its assortment of inspirations. Little of it sticks. The music of the '30s seeps through a handful of tracks, the best of which is led by Big Boi protégé Janelle Monaé, a young vocalist who stomps and sways through her time in the spotlight. Despite Dré's likely position as the driving creative force behind the whole project -- and its further strides away from what his detractors think he should be doing -- he's far more effective as an MC than a singer. When it comes to rapping, he's "bored" with "no dragon to battle," yet the verse containing that proclamation outstrips just about all the lines he croons. "Hollywood Divorce" is an exception, where he does triple duty (producer, MC, vocalist) and guides Big Boi, Lil Wayne, and Snoop Dogg through a modern-day version of "Burn Hollywood Burn." Big Boi is the album's saving grace, still every bit the undervalued force with scythe-like rhymes and gazelle-like moves. Idlewild is certainly a spectacle, and an occasionally entertaining and enlightening one at that, but it translates into an elaborate diversion when compared to what this duo has done in the past.
Rolling Stone - Rob Sheffield
...Idlewild mixes up swing, blues, hip-hop and R&B without losing a step. "Morris Brown" is a typical highlight, with Earth, Wind & Fire-style vocals over the marching-band funk -- it's so suave on the surface, it takes a few spins to absorb how radical it is.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/22/2006
Label:
La Face
UPC:
0828767579122
catalogNumber:
75791

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

OutKast   Primary Artist
Bamboo   Vocals
Snoop Dogg   Vocals
Preston Crump   Bass
Joi   Vocals,Background Vocals
Kevin Kendricks   Keyboards
Debra Killings   Bass,Vocals,Background Vocals
Dave Robbins   Bass,Keyboards
Albey Scholl   Harmonica
Mike Patterson   Bass,Guitar
Terry Smith   Background Vocals
André Benjamin   Vocals
Jerry Freeman   Cornet,Horn
David Whild   Guitar,Background Vocals
Macy Gray   Vocals
Victor Alexander   Drums
Cutmaster Swift   scratching
Lil Wayne   Vocals
Mike Hardnett   Guitar
Marvin "Chanz" Parkman   Keyboards
Sleepy Brown   Vocals,Background Vocals
André 3000   Guitar,Piano,Keyboards,Vocals,Background Vocals
Eddie Ellis   Conductor
David "Whild" Brown   Background Vocals
Janelle Monáe   Vocals,Background Vocals
Jason Freeman   Horn
Steven Boos   Drums
Jeff Bowden   Keyboards
Myrna "Peach" Brown   Vocals
Dookieblossumgame   Vocals
Tuesday Henderson   Percussion
Hot Tub Tony   Background Vocals
Kevin Kendrix   Synthesizer,Piano,Keyboards
Skreechy Peachy   Vocals,Background Vocals
Uncoolgirlz Choir   Background Vocals
Melissa Zampatti   Vocals

Technical Credits

John Fry   Audio Production
John Frye   Engineer
Kevin Kendricks   Producer
Organized Noize   Programming,Producer,drum programming
D.P. "Dad" Carter   Composer
Chris Jackson   Engineer
Matt Still   Audio Production
Vernon Mungo   Engineer
Ralph Cacciurri   Engineer
Sean Davis   Engineer,Audio Production
André Benjamin   Executive Producer
Jerry Freeman   Horn Arrangements
Antwan Patton   Executive Producer
P. Brown   Composer
Robert Hannon   Engineer
Denise Trorman   Art Direction
Malik Albert   Engineer,Audio Production
André 3000   Arranger,Programming,Producer,drum programming
John Holmes   Engineer,Audio Production
Chris Carmouche   Engineer,Audio Production
Morris Brown College Gospel Choir   Instrumentation
Kori Anders   Engineer
Gary Fly   Engineer
Johnny Vulture   Producer
Janelle Monáe   Arranger,Producer
Chuck Lightning   Arranger,Producer
Kevin Kendrix   Horn Arrangements
Matthew Still   Engineer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Idlewild 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Idlewild * 1/2 Stars Outkast is known for making good albums, maybe has gone in the well once two often, this is something like idlewild for the ridiculousness, the singing is terrible, the lyrical content is not good, the music is the only thing more interesting then the rest of the albums. This is a very predicable album So Thumbs Down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is classic OutKast. Anybody that doesn't feel this CD its because its not about drugs, bitches, and guns. This is proof that OutKast is more than Hip Hop its music. They are pushing boundaries and thats always going to make some people think they betrayed there following. This CD doesn't miss a beat!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Song by song: Mighty O -- Classic boom bap. Greatest opener to an Outkast album since Return of the G on Aquemini. Peaches -- Playful funny tune. Big Boi and Sleepy teaming up like Stockton and Malone. Idlewild Blue -- Dre3000 is the only dude on the planet who can pull this song off. N2U -- I love it! "I'm just joshing wit ya hon!" Classic. Morris Brown -- The melody alone is beyond anything they've done in the past. Really stepped their game up with this one. Chronomentrophobia -- Quirky in a Dre3000 way. The Train -- Wow! Daddy Fat Sax put it down. What a chorus. Like a Musical -- Wish this song had been longer. Syncopated rhythm and funky piano. Hollywood Divorce -- Nice song. Lil Wayne with a show stealing verse. Very underappreciated MC. Great song concept describing the destruction of various Black art forms as a result of the assimilation by the larger culture. Call the Law -- That girl can blow! Great blend of Lindyhop and Hip Hop. Buggface -- Jiggy Jiggy Jam! Nice. Makes No Sense at All -- Curious to see how this one plays on the big screen. Humorous tune. In Your Dreams -- Killa Mike! What can you say about this guy? He also comes through in the clutch. Great one. PJ & Rooster -- Nice blend of swing, rag time, and jazz. Instrumentation here is nice. Mutron Angel -- Beautiful song. Another interesting concept. Greatest Show on Earth -- Macy Gray is hilarious. Everytime you think her voice won't work she manages to pull out something that sounds awesome. When I look in Your Eyes -- I love it. Sounds like a Love Below jam. Great swinging tune Dyin to Live -- Another song that will play interestingly in the movie. Bad Note -- A bad note ain't a bad note if it's a good note. 'Kast has always had a way of ending their albums. The tradition continues. You must be a true fan to really appreciate this album. Not one of those fans who just got into 'Kast after they blew up. You have to be down from the very beginning, seeing these brothas rock at free concerts in the park to really understand what is going on here. This is the culmination of years of hard work and dedication to their craft. This album represents all that is right in the world of Hip Hop. Experimental, edgy, soulful, bluesy, moody, playful. Pick your superlative, Kast brought that fiiyah one mo' 'gain. I'm excited to see the movie and I'm anxious to see what they come up with next. Peace and love!
Guest More than 1 year ago
In My opinion, this album was amazing. A good outkast album, however, probably not as good as Speakerboxx/The Love Below. But it is still a very good album. Dre and Big Boi only share about 3 songs in the whole album, and those 3 songs are amazing. I think they should stop making their own individual music, and make more songs together like they used to back in the day. Although their individual songs aren't bad at all, they arent as good as they could be if they are both in it. I thought a few of Andre's songs were good, like "Idlewild Blue", "Life is a Musical", and "Chronomentrophobia", but i thought they were a bit too short. Ill probably get bored of those songs since they are so short.And on Big Boi's songs, his rapping was okay, and the lyrics were pretty good, but the people he chose to sing in some of the songs were not really good choices at all. Aside from all this, i thought the album was good.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've always admired Outkast's originality: their music never sounds like anything anyone else has made or is making. "Idlewild", the musical companion to their movie of the same name, is no different. On their latest effort, they blend blues, funk, soul, and hip-hop in a way that works well. Some of the songs take a few listens to get used to ("Chronometrophobia, "Makes No Sense At All", and "Life Is Like A Musical, to name a few), but the majority of them are a joy to behold ("Mighty O", "Idlewild Blue", "Morris Brown", "In Your Dreams", and "PJ & Rooster" are my favorites). The 1930's sound, which is the time period of the film, is felt throughout, making it consistent. Overall, I'd recommend to the most-open minded of listeners.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Never cease to amaze, they are on a whole other planet, well worth the listen
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album is the bomb. Production is unlike anything availible. Kast has set the bar pretty high. True Kast fans will appreciate this album. Like Outkast been warming us up to this sound, previous albums like STANKONIA & Speakerbox/Lovebelow. I'm really enjoying this, plus my kids can listen with-out having to skip due to explicitness. GO GET IT.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Big Boi and Dre did a fantastic job with this album. They didn't dissapoint any of their fans. They really put together a CD I think is way ahead of the game. Instead of following the new script of making a whole CD about guns, naked women bouncing up and down, diamonds, and candy painted cars, they concentrated on real music and if you ask me (a fan of good quality music) they did the damn thing.