If a Chicken Stayed for Supper

If a Chicken Stayed for Supper

4.0 1
by Carrie Weston, Sophie Fatus
     
 
Mommy Fox has gone hunting for a chicken for supper. Yum! Her five cubs can't wait. They even sneak out of their den. But it's scary outside at night and one of them could get lost. In fact, one of them could already be lost! The five little foxes take turns counting one another and-gasp!-they only count to four! It takes an unexpected feathery visitor to calm down

Overview

Mommy Fox has gone hunting for a chicken for supper. Yum! Her five cubs can't wait. They even sneak out of their den. But it's scary outside at night and one of them could get lost. In fact, one of them could already be lost! The five little foxes take turns counting one another and-gasp!-they only count to four! It takes an unexpected feathery visitor to calm down the cubs and lead them safely back to their den, where Mommy Fox is busy preparing a very special supper . . . .

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

In Weston's (Lucky Socks) cute if rather woolly story, a hen becomes a welcome dinner guest in an unlikely place. When Mommy Fox goes off to find her five little foxes a chicken to eat for supper, she asks them not to leave the den. So of course they do: "They jumped. They romped. They rolled. They tumbled. They crept and leapt." Eventually—as any preschooler could have told them—all this moonlit merriment leads to a major meltdown. Luckily, Mommy Hen discovers the foxes, dries their tears and leads them safely back to their den. Mommy Fox realizes that eating Mommy Hen would be very bad manners indeed, and everyone settles down for a nice pot of vegetable soup. Fatus's (The Story Tree) naïf paintings bubble with a silly winsomeness, and there's a funny bit involving the little foxes' miscounting of one another, which leads them to the hysterical conclusion that one of their number is irretrievably lost. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Mommy Fox warns her five little ones not to leave the den as she sets out one night to bring home a chicken for supper. But impatient Rag goes out to play, and soon Rusty, Tufty, Misty, and Mufty join the fun. They suddenly fear that one of them might get lost in the dark. When Tufty counts them, she forgets to count herself; they all weep at the thought that one of them is missing. Mother Hen arrives to do an accurate count, to the delight of the little ones, who invite her into the den. There worried Mommy Fox is cooking only vegetables for dinner. In a surprise happy ending, however, seven bowls are set out. The foxes do have "a chicken for supper," one who is an appreciative guest. Aside from the fun of the silly foxes, the appeal of the story derives from the stylized paintings of the characters and the setting of lollypop trees, sweeping hills, and the variety of page designs displaying the young foxes at play and in weeping distress. The plump white hen makes a fine visual contrast to the dark trees and sharp-nosed red foxes. Only Mother Fox shows teeth. Counting practice for young reader-listeners along with the silly foxes is an added attraction.
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2
When their mother goes out to find a chicken for dinner, five little foxes disobey her and leave their den. Once outside, they fear that one of them might get lost, so the youngsters conduct head and tail counts, each neglecting to include himself. Their bewilderment and worry as they come up short are both poignant and hilarious. Kind Mother Hen comes to their emotional and mathematical rescue, taking them safely back home. Mommy Fox, who has returned, recognizes a good deed when she sees one and has chicken for dinner�but this time as a guest for vegetable soup. The language is engaging and precise, complemented by the vibrant and cheerful illustrations, rich with folk-art inspiration and a pleasing page layout. Definitely a charmer.
—Susan MoorheadCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823420674
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

If a Chicken Stayed for Supper 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
A maternal instinct is both wonderful and mysterious. If that feeling is strong enough it not only applies to one's own offspring but also to other youngsters, especially those in need. Such is the case in Carrie Weston's warm and witty story. It was a clear night but very dark when Mother Fox kissed each of her five children goodbye saying, 'We will have chicken for supper tonight!' She also warned them not to set any paws outside of their den and they promised. Well, you can imagine what happened when those five little rascals were left alone. They couldn't resist doing some exploring and pretty soon they were out playing in the woods. However, it was so dark that they soon feared one of them was lost. Unfortunately they couldn't count so weren't able to determine for sure whether they were four or five. Of course, they wept and did not know what to do. When Mother Hen heard their wailing she approached them, and took care of the matter by counting for them. Sure enough, all five were there. She led all of them back to their den. They begged her to come in with them, and she said, 'Well, just for a minute or two.' Oh-oh - a chicken in a fox's den? There's a lesson to be learned in this brightly illustrated book. - Gail Cooke