If I Could Only Remember My Name [Bonus Tracks]

If I Could Only Remember My Name [Bonus Tracks]

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by David Crosby
     
 

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David Crosby's debut solo album, If I Could Only Remember My Name is a one-shot wonder of dreamy but ominous California ambience. The songs range from brief snapshots of inspiration (the angelic chorale-vocal showcase on "Orleans" and the a cappella closer, "I'd Swear There Was Somebody Here") to the full-blown, rambling western epic "Cowboy Movie," and there are

Overview

David Crosby's debut solo album, If I Could Only Remember My Name is a one-shot wonder of dreamy but ominous California ambience. The songs range from brief snapshots of inspiration (the angelic chorale-vocal showcase on "Orleans" and the a cappella closer, "I'd Swear There Was Somebody Here") to the full-blown, rambling western epic "Cowboy Movie," and there are absolutely no false notes struck or missteps taken. No one before or since has gotten as much mileage out of a wordless vocal as Crosby does on "Tamalpais High (At About 3)" and "Song with No Words (Tree with No Leaves)," and because the music is so relaxed, each song turns into its own panoramic vista. Those who don't go for trippy Aquarian sentiment, however, may be slightly put off by the obscure, cosmic storytelling of the gorgeous "Laughing," or the ambiguous (but pointed) social questioning of "What Are Their Names," but in actuality it is an incredibly focused album. Even when a song as pretty as "Traction in the Rain" shimmers with its picked guitars and autoharp, the album is coated in a distinct, persistent menace that is impossible to shake. It is a shame that Crosby would continue to descend throughout the remainder of the decade and the beginning of the next into aimless drug addiction, and that he would not issue another solo album until 18 years later. As it is, If I Could Only Remember My Name is a shambolic masterpiece, meandering but transcendentally so, full of frayed threads. Not only is it among the finest splinter albums out of the CSN&Y diaspora, it is one of the defining moments of hungover spirituality from the era. [In 2006, Rhino reissued the album with a bonus track (the seven-minute instrumental "Kids and Dogs," on which the singing is wordless scatting); historical liner notes, including comments on individual tracks by Crosby himself; and a DVD that included a Surround Sound mix, a stereo Dolby Digital mix, photos, and lyrics. The DVD also included a lengthy interview -- with only printed content, and no video or audio component -- about the recording of the album with Stephen Barncard, who recorded and mixed the original LP.]

Editorial Reviews

Entertainment Weekly - Clark Collis
The music stands as some of the greatest to be produced by the early-'70s West Coast scene. (A)

Product Details

Release Date:
11/21/2006
Label:
Rhino
UPC:
0081227320423
catalogNumber:
73204
Rank:
45018

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

David Crosby   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Michael Shrieve   Percussion,Drums
Mickey Hart   Percussion,Drums
Jerry Garcia   Guitar
Jorma Kaukonen   Guitar
Joni Mitchell   Background Vocals
Graham Nash   Guitar,Piano,Background Vocals
Grace Slick   Background Vocals
Neil Young   Guitar,Conga,Background Vocals,Vibes
Paul Kantner   Guitar
Gregg Rolie   Piano
David Freiberg   Background Vocals
Bill Kreutzmann   Percussion,Drums
Laura Allan   Autoharp

Technical Credits

Crosby & Nash   Arranger,Producer,Song Notes
Graham Nash   Composer
Neil Young   Composer
Craig Anderson   Authoring
Stephen Barncard   Engineer,Remixing,Song Notes
Gary Burden   Art Direction
Spencer Chrislu   Director
David Crosby   Composer,Audio Production
David Geffen   Direction
Robert Hammer   Cover Photo
Henry Lewy   Engineer
Elliot Roberts   Management
David Dieckmann   Authoring
Matthew Greenwald   Liner Notes
Traditional   Composer
Robin Hurley   Producer

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If I Could Only Remember My Name 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is as close to an all-star gathering where the guests left their egos (and probably a few stray brain cells) at the door as you're likely ever to find. Joni Mitchell, Jerry Garcia, much of Jefferson Airplane, some Quicksilver and a whole host of others join in these mellow, cosmic proceedings. And the music is transcendent of time and origin, though the Haight-Ashbury vibe is deeply felt. This grouping of uncluttered genius unfortunately would never be repeated. Even the LP most closely related in time, studio and personnel, Paul Kantner's "Blows Against the Empire," seems worlds away in taste and temperament. A fleeting moment, but graciously caught and recorded just before the bubble of 60s commited idealism burst.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not a lot of people know this album, but if you like CSN/CSNY this is the 'other' album. Classic David Crosby.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this album is a masterpiece. having worn out three original vinyls and still having one for my daughter to keep should be testimony enough. the album [and the musicians on it] serves as a window through which one can view what was happening musically and socially at that time. what is great about it is that it is still relevant... and musically vibrant.
Guest More than 1 year ago
David Crosby assembled the cream of the crop from CSN, the Dead, the Airplane, Quicksilver, even Joni Mitchell. It's transcendent! Amazingly, the ablum received little notice when released, and seemed to fade quickly into obscurity. A real gem!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago