If I Could Write This In Fire

( 2 )

Overview

In her first book-length collection of nonfiction, Cliff interweaves reflections on her life in Jamaica, England, and the United States with a powerful and sustained critique of racism, homophobia, and social injustice. If I Could Write This in Fire begins by tracing her transatlantic journey from Jamaica to England, coalescing around a graceful, elliptical account of her childhood friendship with Zoe, who is dark-skinned and from an impoverished, rural background; the divergent life courses that each is forced ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $14.58   
  • Used (5) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

In her first book-length collection of nonfiction, Cliff interweaves reflections on her life in Jamaica, England, and the United States with a powerful and sustained critique of racism, homophobia, and social injustice. If I Could Write This in Fire begins by tracing her transatlantic journey from Jamaica to England, coalescing around a graceful, elliptical account of her childhood friendship with Zoe, who is dark-skinned and from an impoverished, rural background; the divergent life courses that each is forced to take; and the class and color tensions that shape their lives as adults. In other essays and poems, Cliff writes about the discovery of her distinctive, diasporic literary voice, recalls her wild colonial girlhood and sexual awakening, and recounts traveling through an American landscape of racism, colonialism, and genocide - a history of violence embodied in seemingly innocuous souvenirs and tourist sites.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780816654741
  • Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
  • Publication date: 8/29/2008
  • Series: Wicazo SA Review Ser.
  • Pages: 89
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface: Journey into Speech

And What Would It Be Like 1

If I Could Write This in Fire, I Would Write This in Fire 9

Cross-Country: A Documentary in Ten Jump-Cuts 33

Sites of Memory 49

Lynchburg 2003 65

The Thing behind the Trees 71

In My Heart, a Darkness 79

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Good Writing / Worn Out and Over Used Ideas

    This loosely autobiographical piece spent most of its time explaining how the English, Americans, Germans and Caucasian people in general have lots of explaining to do. It meandered through time and distance and jumped back and forth through different episodes of Michelle Cliff¿s life. And she spends much of the time telling us how she doesn¿t fit in Jamaica, England and the United States, but somehow we get the feeling she thinks that it¿s our fault.<BR/><BR/>I also found it interesting about the title of the book. Before reading it I wanted to find out a little more about the author so I Googled it. If I Could Write This in Fire is also the title of an anthology of Caribbean writing previously compiled and published by a professor at NYU. And there was even a previous anthology If I Could Write This in Fire I Would Write This in Fire which Cliff was involved in herself. I have to wonder why the recycling of this book¿s title?<BR/><BR/>Back to Cliff¿s narrative, supposedly privileged by being a light skinned mulatto in dark Jamaican society, she blames the colonial British past for this and asserts that Jamaica¿s colonial heritage is somehow alive in the shadow now of the United States. I haven¿t been to Jamaica, but I have been to about sixty other countries and I can say that Jamaica is an independent country. If they suffer from colonization, then that is in their mindset more than their reality. It ends when they end it.<BR/><BR/>I think the Michelle Cliff would tell me that I missed something ¿ probably something very important to her. She might even scold me openly or at least in her mind. But I do remember being told by a teacher when I was young to remember: I can¿t change who I am but I can change how I am.<BR/><BR/>I suppose that almost all of the vignettes of Michelle¿s life can be summed up by her attitude which is screamingly prevalent when she tells of how she can rarely ever bring white people close to her as friends because no matter how equally they treat people from other races, eventually they will fail and show themselves to be racists in hiding. This statement is about as racist as they come. But at least Michelle Cliff doesn¿t candy coat it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)