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If I Should Die
     

If I Should Die

2.5 2
by Sally Franklin Christie, Christy Phillippe (Editor), Amanda Kelsey (Illustrator)
 
Murder, embezzlement, betrayal, and silence...

Peyton Farley, a southwest Montana newspaper researcher, awakens to find a man bleeding to death on her kitchen floor. The stranger draws one last gurgling breath. As Peyton awaits the arrival of the first responders, the man's body disappears. Local authorities accuse Peyton of murder. No sooner is she released from

Overview

Murder, embezzlement, betrayal, and silence...

Peyton Farley, a southwest Montana newspaper researcher, awakens to find a man bleeding to death on her kitchen floor. The stranger draws one last gurgling breath. As Peyton awaits the arrival of the first responders, the man's body disappears. Local authorities accuse Peyton of murder. No sooner is she released from custody on charges of murder and illegal disposal of a body, when she is abducted by a cab driver named Tater. If I Should Die is a nonstop page-turner involving murder, embezzlement, and the ultimate betrayal.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781615722129
Publisher:
Caliburn Press
Publication date:
11/07/2010
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.34(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

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If I Should Die 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
gaele More than 1 year ago
I received a copy of this book from the author for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review, and all conclusions are my own responsibility. What a great read with enough twists and turns that make the “who did it” near impossible to detect until near the end. And even then, there are questions that are not answered until the last page is turned. Filled with both the best and worst of things people do to and with each other, each person encountered has a hand in the deception; implicitly or unknowingly. It starts with a dying man on Peyton’s kitchen floor, and quickly moves to a murder scene without a victim when she leaves the room to call for help. Told in multiple points of view, the one voice that never really clearly shows “why” they behave as they do left me wondering about whether or not there was just random craziness or there was a history of increased distance with reality. Weaving together multiple storylines with only the unknown dead man in common, the duplicity of his life is mirrored in the dual-storylines that follow his loved ones in two parts of the country. A successful story with a clever plot and even more clever writing that moved the action forward, even while in reminiscence, this is a great first novel from this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago