If I Were Your Father

Overview

DADDY, HOW DID YOU LEARN TO BE A FATHER? a child wonders. DID YOU GO TO SCHOOL?

Yes, But no one taught me THAT, says his father with a smile.

WELL, I COULD TEACH YOU, DADDY, says his son. IF I WERE YOUR FATHER, I'D LET YOU SHAVE ME WITH WHIPPED CREAM.... I'D TAKE YOU FISHING ON A SCHOOL DAY... AND WED GO HUNTING FOR BURIED TREASURE!

In this warm and humorous conversation, a little boy offers his own fantastic ...

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1999 Hardcover New in New jacket Buy with confidence from "Your neighborhood book store on the World Wide Web". (tm)-Since 1997 delivering quality books to our neighbors, all ... around the world! Read more Show Less

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Overview

DADDY, HOW DID YOU LEARN TO BE A FATHER? a child wonders. DID YOU GO TO SCHOOL?

Yes, But no one taught me THAT, says his father with a smile.

WELL, I COULD TEACH YOU, DADDY, says his son. IF I WERE YOUR FATHER, I'D LET YOU SHAVE ME WITH WHIPPED CREAM.... I'D TAKE YOU FISHING ON A SCHOOL DAY... AND WED GO HUNTING FOR BURIED TREASURE!

In this warm and humorous conversation, a little boy offers his own fantastic vision of what a father might do. But soon he begins to discover a TRUE treasure — his father's love and encouragement, always ready and waiting, right by his side.

A girl tells her mother all the special things she would do for her if their positions were reversed and she was the mother.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In these affectionate companion books, a girl imagines switching places with her mother, and a boy with his father. The children describe whimsical activities like building a tree house with an elevator and hiding so much buried treasure in their pockets that their pants fall down. But most of the children's ideas hint slyly at what their parents don't let them do: "If I were your mother, I'd let you jump from the sofa to the armchair"; "If I were your father, I wouldn't yell if you stood in front of the TV while I was watching a game." The parent and child banter playfully, building on the scenarios in alternating red and blue text to indicate which line of dialogue belongs to which speaker. Bridges reuses the parent-child call-and-response format of her Will You Take Care of Me?, but with greater originality and range. The lightness and warmth of Denton's (A Child's Treasure of Nursery Rhymes) watercolors complement the softness of the text. Her impish, wide-faced characters may remind readers of more staid versions of Maurice Sendak's (a few of the girl's poses and costumes look borrowed). While the mother and daughter are snugglier than their male counterparts (Dad refers to his boy as "buddy" throughout), the girl is the livelier of the two kids; her dancing, swinging and jumping convey terrific energy. Both books revel in the coziness of a loving relationship. Ages 3-up. (May) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
"How did you learn to be a father, Daddy?" asks a chipper little boy in his blue pajamas. The dialogue in red and blue between father and son is like a game with the boy telling his Dad about all the wonderful things a good Dad should do and the father responding with leading questions. The pictures on each spread show the boy's fantasy while the other shows what is really happening-the boy is dressed, fed, and cared for by a Dad who even bakes muffins. It ends with an amusing sequence with Dad remarking that his son had some great ideas and that he will undoubtedly be a good father someday. When the boy asks how he will remember everything Dad says "Don't worry, buddy. I'll be there to remind you." Pure delight, and a book that unabashedly features a nurturing, loving father.
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
Christopher, my husband, loves reading aloud to our daughter Christy, who, like most babies, seems to relish the playful language in little poems and songs. With its engaging, chant-like dialogue, Margaret Park Bridges' If I Were Your Father is sure to be a big hit with dads and kids. The young protagonist gleefully speculates on his doings if he were the big guy around the house: "shave with whipped cream" and go "fishing on a school day." Kady MacDonald Denton's watercolors show father and son cooking, chatting, just hanging out and perfectly complement the tender and humorous exchange set forth in the text.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-Playing on every child's fantasy of being a mommy or daddy, these two books show a parent and child engaged in daily activities while the youngster imagines the glorious things he or she would do with the power of parenthood. The boy in Father pictures taking his son fishing on a school day and hunting for buried treasure as ideal parenting activities, while the girl in Mother describes the giant tree house and bathtub full of goldfish she would provide for her daughter. The adults are willing accomplices, each playing along with their child's game and even expanding on it. Both books end with the youngster sitting in the parent's lap, content to return to traditional roles. Although the sentences are short and the vocabulary simple, the author laces the text with the kind of poetry that appeals to young minds, describing the stars as "sprinkles on a chocolate ice cream sky." The watercolor illustrations work well with the stories, using bright colors for the imaginary scenes and a softer palette for the ordinary world. Both books would make good read-alouds for storytime, particularly on Mother's Day and Father's Day, and could also be used in classrooms to inspire discussion about what it would be like to be parent for a day.-Dawn Amsberry, formerly at Oakland Public Library, CA Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
If I Were Your Father (32 pp.; PLB May; 0-688-15192-2; PLB 0-688-15193-0): A young boy offers his ideas on parenthood to his father. As the two of them putter around, the boy notes that he would shave with whipped cream, brush his teeth with cake frosting, and take his son fishing on a school day. Both grin their way through the book and through the jaunty repartee: "If I were your father, I'd tuck you in so tight the covers would never come loose." "But what if I had to go to the bathroom?" "You'd slide out like a letter from an envelope." This is all very winsome and benign, with the affection so evident on every page that the book is more of a greeting card than a story that moves forward to a natural conclusion. Denton's airy illustrations are perfectly in keeping with the book's sweet tone. (Picture book. 3-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688151928
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/12/1999
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 3 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.33 (w) x 9.34 (h) x 0.44 (d)

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