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If I Were Your Mother
     

If I Were Your Mother

by Margaret Park Bridges, Kady MacDonald Denton (Illustrator), Kady MacDonald Denton (Illustrator)
 

"Mommy, do you ever wish you were a little girl again?" a child wonders.

"Sometimes, Honey," says her mother with a smile.

"Well, I could pretend I was your mother and you were my little girl," says her daughter with a twinkle in her eye. "If I were your mother, I'd bring you breakfast on a silver tray.... I'd build you a giant tree house.... And I'd give you

Overview

"Mommy, do you ever wish you were a little girl again?" a child wonders.

"Sometimes, Honey," says her mother with a smile.

"Well, I could pretend I was your mother and you were my little girl," says her daughter with a twinkle in her eye. "If I were your mother, I'd bring you breakfast on a silver tray.... I'd build you a giant tree house.... And I'd give you a bath with goldfish!"

In this tender exchange, a little girl offers her own fanciful vision of what a mother might do. But soon she begins to see that the most precious things in life — a simple kiss on the forehead, an ear to whisper in, a place in Mommy's lap — are always ready and waiting, just when she needs them.

Editorial Reviews

Martha V. Parravano
A boy tells his father what he would do if he were the father, and a girl tells her mother what she would do as mother. Lively illustrations, reminiscent of Sendak's early work, alternate between the real world, in which the parent is caring for the child, and the child's imaginings. The books capture the thing that matter to young children.
The Horn Book Guide
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In these affectionate companion books, a girl imagines switching places with her mother, and a boy with his father. The children describe whimsical activities like building a tree house with an elevator and hiding so much buried treasure in their pockets that their pants fall down. But most of the children's ideas hint slyly at what their parents don't let them do: "If I were your mother, I'd let you jump from the sofa to the armchair"; "If I were your father, I wouldn't yell if you stood in front of the TV while I was watching a game." The parent and child banter playfully, building on the scenarios in alternating red and blue text to indicate which line of dialogue belongs to which speaker. Bridges reuses the parent-child call-and-response format of her Will You Take Care of Me?, but with greater originality and range. The lightness and warmth of Denton's (A Child's Treasure of Nursery Rhymes) watercolors complement the softness of the text. Her impish, wide-faced characters may remind readers of more staid versions of Maurice Sendak's (a few of the girl's poses and costumes look borrowed). While the mother and daughter are snugglier than their male counterparts (Dad refers to his boy as "buddy" throughout), the girl is the livelier of the two kids; her dancing, swinging and jumping convey terrific energy. Both books revel in the coziness of a loving relationship. Ages 3-up. (May) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-Playing on every child's fantasy of being a mommy or daddy, these two books show a parent and child engaged in daily activities while the youngster imagines the glorious things he or she would do with the power of parenthood. The boy in Father pictures taking his son fishing on a school day and hunting for buried treasure as ideal parenting activities, while the girl in Mother describes the giant tree house and bathtub full of goldfish she would provide for her daughter. The adults are willing accomplices, each playing along with their child's game and even expanding on it. Both books end with the youngster sitting in the parent's lap, content to return to traditional roles. Although the sentences are short and the vocabulary simple, the author laces the text with the kind of poetry that appeals to young minds, describing the stars as "sprinkles on a chocolate ice cream sky." The watercolor illustrations work well with the stories, using bright colors for the imaginary scenes and a softer palette for the ordinary world. Both books would make good read-alouds for storytime, particularly on Mother's Day and Father's Day, and could also be used in classrooms to inspire discussion about what it would be like to be parent for a day.-Dawn Amsberry, formerly at Oakland Public Library, CA Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688151904
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/28/1999
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.12(w) x 9.32(h) x 1.26(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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