If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things

( 9 )

Overview


Risky in conception, hip and yet soulful, this is a prose poem of a novel -- intense, lyrical, and highly evocative -- with a mystery at its center, which keeps the reader in suspense until the final page. In a tour de force that could be described as Altmanesque, we are invited into the private lives of the residents of a quiet urban street in England over the course of a single day. In delicate, intricately observed closeup, we witness the hopes, fears, and unspoken despairs of a diverse community: the man ...
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If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things

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Overview


Risky in conception, hip and yet soulful, this is a prose poem of a novel -- intense, lyrical, and highly evocative -- with a mystery at its center, which keeps the reader in suspense until the final page. In a tour de force that could be described as Altmanesque, we are invited into the private lives of the residents of a quiet urban street in England over the course of a single day. In delicate, intricately observed closeup, we witness the hopes, fears, and unspoken despairs of a diverse community: the man with painfully scarred hands who tried in vain to save his wife from a burning house and who must now care for his young daughter alone; a group of young clubgoers just home from an all-night rave, sweetly high and mulling over vague dreams; the nervous young man at number 18 who collects weird urban junk and is haunted by the specter of unrequited love. The tranquillity of the street is shattered at day's end when a terrible accident occurs. This tragedy and an utterly surprising twist provide the momentum for the book. But it is the author's exquisite rendering of the ordinary, the everyday, that gives this novel its freshness, its sense of beauty, wonder, and hope. Rarely does a writer appear with so much music and poetry -- so much vision -- that he can make the world seem new.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"[McGregor's] sharp eye and broad sympathies show a true novelistic sensibility and a sizable talent." Kirkus Reviews

"A wonderful evocation of the beauty and horror of the literally everyday." Booklist, ALA, Starred Review

"Absolutely resplendent, the work of a true seer who does for urban England what John Cheever did for Westchester County." Bookpage

"Poignant." Publishers Weekly

"This is fast fiction, as fast as the mind works . . . it's what James Joyce and Virginia Woolf worked to achieve." Los Angeles Times

"What James Joyce and Virginia Woolf worked to achieve." -- A Los Angeles Times Best Book of 2003

Los Angeles Times

"Nameless though they may be, McGregor's characters become momentarily vivid through his keen sense of detail and lyrical writing style." The San Francisco Chronicle

Publishers Weekly
McGregor's poignant, Booker-nominated debut examines in loving detail a day in the lives of the inhabitants of a single British block. It is a day like any other-a woman prepares breakfast for her family, boys play cricket, a man washes his car-until a terrible accident occurs, which is witnessed by all the neighbors but concealed from readers until the novel's end. Drifting from apartment to house to yard, McGregor reveals the stories found in each: there is the couple who fight bitterly and have brilliant sex; the man with hands scarred from trying, unsuccessfully, to save his wife from a fire; the aging veteran keeping from his wife the truth of his imminent demise. Weaving through these tales of the transcendental ordinary is the first-person narrative of a girl coming to terms with her unexpected pregnancy after a one-night stand. Her lover's twin brother arrives to drive her to her parents, but doesn't tell her the truth about his brother's absence; the girl's mother has her own secrets. McGregor's rapt attention to the exquisiteness of daily life sometimes makes his details ring falsely portentous, and his unwavering focus on minutiae-rain, traffic lights-can be wearying. But as the man with the scarred hands remarks, "there are many things you could miss if you are not paying careful attention. There are remarkable things all the time." This is the guiding principle of McGregor's novel, one that requires patience but yields ample rewards. (Nov. 4) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A prizewinning first novel from England is an impressionist portrait of neighbors on one city block. Listen, coos the narrator, listen, with a faint echo, at the start, of Dylan Thomas’s Under Milk Wood. Thomas was evoking a Welsh village, while McGregor is summoning the nightsounds of an English city. It’s summertime. There’s a street of row houses. Neighbors are running errands, hanging out, doing chores. Then something terrible happens, and the neighbors share the horror, transfixed; the event is not described until the end. Small kids improvise a cricket game with a milk crate; older hip kids return from all-night clubbing to smoke weed. A lonely archaeology student collects sidewalk odds and ends ("urban archiving"). A man with ruined hands listens respectfully to his daughter’s visions of angels. An old couple step out jauntily to celebrate their 55th anniversary. With the neighbors as a backdrop, the spotlight turns to a character we’ll call The Girl. She’s just learned she is pregnant, the result of a marvelous one-night-stand in Scotland. She met the student only once, too, at a party, when she was high; they arranged a date that she forgot, though the student never forgot her. His twin brother shows up and drives The Girl to her parents. As she reveals the secret of her pregnancy, she learns her mother’s own well-kept secret. Secrets are legion on the block. The old man has not told his wife he’s terminally ill, and Michael has yet to tell The Girl the secret of his brother’s disappearance. Delicate little clues tell us that some of the neighbors are from the subcontinent, but color and ethnicity aren’t important here; the "remarkable things" of the title are the small momentsof the here-and-now that rival angelic visions. Those are what McGregor is celebrating. The halting conversations are overdone, and that street horror is problematic, but 26-year-old McGregor’s sharp eye and broad sympathies show a true novelistic sensibility and a sizable talent. Agent: Jin Auh/Wylie Agency
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618344581
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 11/4/2003
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 232,693
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author


Jon McGregor is twenty-six, and this is his first novel. It was published in Britain in 2002 to critical acclaim, and was inspired in part by the phenomenal media attention that surrounded the death of Princess Diana. Around the same time, a young man was shot in McGregor's own neighborhood; the novel, he writes, is about "how the everyday miracles of life and death go unwitnessed in favor of celebrity and sensation, and the difficulty of experiencing community in an increasingly transient society." McGregor lives in Nottingham, England.
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Read an Excerpt


If you listen, you can hear it.
The city, it sings.
If you stand quietly, at the foot of a garden, in the middle of a street, on the roof of a house.
It’s clearest at night, when the sound cuts more sharply across the surface of things, when the song reaches out to a place inside you.
It’s a wordless song, for the most, but it’s a song all the same, and nobody hearing it could doubt what it sings. And the song sings the loudest when you pick out each note.

The low soothing hum of air-conditioners, fanning out the heat and the smells of shops and cafes and offices across the city, winding up and winding down, long breaths layered upon each other, a lullaby hum for tired streets.
The rush of traffic still cutting across flyovers, even in the dark hours a constant crush of sound, tyres rolling across tarmac and engines rumbling, loose drains and manhole covers clack-clacking like cast-iron castanets.
Road-menders mending, choosing the hours of least interruption, rupturing the cold night air with drills and jack-hammers and pneumatic pumps, hard- sweating beneath the fizzing hiss of floodlights, shouting to each other like drummers in rock bands calling out rhythms, pasting new skin on the veins of the city.
Restless machines in workshops and factories with endless shifts, turning and pumping and steaming and sparking, pressing and rolling and weaving and printing, the hard crash and ring and clatter lifting out of echo-high buildings and sifting into the night, an unaudited product beside the paper and cloth and steel and bread, the packed and the bound and the made.
Lorries reversing, right round the arc of industrial parks, it seems every lorry in town is reversing, backing through gateways, easing up ramps, shrill- calling their presence while forklift trucks gas and prang around them, heaping and stacking and loading.
And all the alarms, calling for help, each district and quarter, each street and estate, each every way you turn has alarms going off, coming on, going off, coming on, a hammered ring like a lightning drum-roll, like a mesmeric bell- toll, the false and the real as loud as each other, crying their needs to the night like an understaffed orphanage, babies waawaa-ing in darkened wards.
Sung sirens, sliding through the streets, streaking blue light from distress to distress, the slow wail weaving urgency through the darkest of the dark hours, a lament lifted high, held above the rooftops and fading away, lifted high, flashing past, fading away.

And all these things sing constant, the machines and the sirens, the cars blurting hey and rumbling all headlong, the hoots and the shouts and the hums and the crackles, all come together and rouse like a choir, sinking and rising with the turn of the wind, the counter and solo, the harmony humming expecting more voices.

So listen.
Listen, and there is more to hear.
The rattle of a dustbin lid knocked to the floor.
The scrawl and scratch of two hackle-raised cats.
The sudden thundercrash of bottles emptied into crates. The slam-slam of car doors, the changing of gears, the hobbled clip-clop of a slow walk home.
The rippled roll of shutters pulled down on late-night cafes, a crackled voice crying street names for taxis, a loud scream that lingers and cracks into laughter, a bang that might just be an old car backfiring, a callbox calling out for an answer, a treeful of birds tricked into morning, a whistle and a shout and a broken glass, a blare of soft music and a blam of hard beats, a barking and yelling and singing and crying and it all swells up all the rumbles and crashes and bangings and slams, all the noise and the rush and the non-stop wonder of the song of the city you can hear if you listen the song

and it stops

in some rare and sacred dead time, sandwiched between the late sleepers and the early risers, there is a miracle of silence.

Everything has stopped.

And silence drops down from out of the night, into this city, the briefest of silences, like a falter between heartbeats, like a darkness between blinks. Secretly, there is always this moment, an unexpected pause, a hesitation as one day is left behind and a new one begins.
A catch of breath as gasometer lungs begin slow exhalations.
A ring of tinnitus as thermostats interrupt air-conditioning fans.
These moments are there, always, but they are rarely noticed and they rarely last longer than a flicker of thought.
We are in that moment now, there is silence and the whole city is still.

The old tall-windowed mills, staggered across the skyline, they are silent, they are keeping their ghosts and their thoughts to themselves.
The smoked-glass offices, slung low to the ground, they are still, they are blannkly reflecting the haze and shine of the night. Soon, they will resume their business, their coy whispers of ones and zeroes across networks of threaded glass, but now, for a moment, they are hushed.
The buses in the depot, waiting for a new day, they are quiet, their metalwork easing and shrinking into place, settling and cooling after eighteen hours of heat and noise, eighteen hours of criss-crossing the city like wool on a loom.
And the clubs in the centre, they are empty, the dance-floors sticky and sore from a night’s pounding, the lights still turning and blinking, lost shoes and wallets and keys gathered in heaps.
And the night-fishers strung out along the canal, feeling the sing of their lines in the water, although they are within yards of each other they are saying nothing, watching luminous floats hang in the night like bottled fireflies, waiting for the dip and strike which will bring a centre to their time here, waiting for the quietness and calm they have come here to find.
Even the traffic scattered through these streets: the taxis and the cleaners, the shift-workers and the delivery drivers, even they are held still in this moment, trapped by traffic lights which synchronise red as the system cycles from old day to new, hundreds of feet resting on accelerators, hundreds of pairs of eyes hanging on the lights, all waiting for the amber, all waiting for the green.

The whole city has stopped.

And this is a pause worth savouring, because the world will soon be complicated again.

It’s the briefest of pauses, with not time enough to even turn full circle and look at all the lights this city throws out to the sky, and it’s a pause which is easily broken. A slamming door, a car alarm, a thin drift of music from half a mile away, and already the city is moving on, already tomorrow is here.

The music is coming from a curryhouse near the football ground, careering out of speakers placed outside to attract extra custom. The restaurant is almost empty, a bhindi masala in one corner, a special korma in the other, and the carpark is deserted except for a young couple standing with their arms around each other’s waists. They’ve not been a couple long, a few days perhaps, or a week, and they are both still excited and nervous with desire and possibility. They’ve come here to dance, drawn sideways from their route home by the music and by bravado, and now they are hesitating, unsure of how to begin, unfamiliar with the steps, embarrassed.

But they do begin, and as the first smudges of light seep into the sky from the east, from the far side of the city and in towards these streets, they hold their heads high and their backs straight and step together in time to the slide and wheel of the music. They dance with a style more suited to the ballroom than to the bollywood movies the music comes from, but they dance all the same, hips swinging, waists touching, eyes fixed on eyes. The waiters have come across to the window, they are laughing, they are calling uncle uncle to the man in the kitchen who is finally beginning to clean up after a long night. They dance, and he steps out of the door to watch, wiping his hands on his apron, licking the weary tips of his fingers, pulling at his long beard. They dance, and he smiles and nods and thinks of his wife sleeping at home, and thinks of when they were young and might still have done something like this.

Elsewhere, across the city, the day is beginning with a rush and a shout, the fast whine of office hoovers, the locked slam of lorry doors, the hurried clocking on of the early shifts.

But here, as the dawn sneaks up on the last day of summer, and as a man with tired hands watches a young couple dance in the carpark of his restaurant, there are only these: sparkling eyes, smudged lipstick, fading starlight, the crunching of feet on gravel, laughter, and a slow walk home.

Copyright © 2002 by Jon McGregor. Reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Company.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Beautiful Book

    In my top 3 books now - along with Time Traveler's Wife and The Book Thief.

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  • Posted November 29, 2008

    If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things - Truly Remarkable

    This is an outstanding book. I defy anyone to read this without being moved at the emotive stance the author takes. There is a piece of all of us in there, in one or other of the characters. My heart was breaking reading the thoughts and feelings of the returning soldier and knowing that he could no longer pick up a spade, even after so many years. The reality of the people and, that's how I should have referred to them in the first place, and not charaters, was overwhelming. Each one of us passes people in the street every day who have experienced these thoughts and feelings and do we ever think twice? If you don't like to think - don't read this book. If you don't like emotion - don't read this book. If you believe in the power of friendship and are the type of person who really wants to know how someone is when you say "how are you?" - this book is definitely for you. It will not disappoint - but it may leave you with a sense of sadness - but that just shows you care.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2006

    Poetic Beauty

    I found this book by accident. I was intrigued by the title (which I always seem to mess up when I recommend it to friends). The narrative style is very similar to 'The English Patient', and just as rewarding. For those readers who enjoy story 'hooks', unexpected endings,and beauty in the everyday world, this book is for you. McGregor has woven a mesmerizing story together in this novel, and those who experiment as I did with this title, will not be disappointed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2005

    Does Anyone Use '...' Anymore?

    Although there are no quotation marks used in this novel, I had no trouble reading the dialogue. It seems to me that more and more books are written this way, nowadays. I wasn't sure that I liked this book, and I put it down for about a month. The characters kept calling me back, and I'm still thinking about them a week after I've finished the book. Some books, I've absolutely loved and forgotten immediately. While this writer's art may be an acquired taste, it's one that lingers on the palate.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2004

    Wonderful, unexpected find!

    I found this by accident on the bookstore shelf and it turned out to be a unexpected treasure. I love the style in which the story was told, by skipping around from one character to another. It only adds to the mystery at the end of the book. After I was done reading, I wanted to know more about each character, including their names! I finished this book last week and yet I am still thinking about some of the stories, especially the heartbreaking elderly couple. I highly reccomend this well written and poetic novel. It's truly a remarkable book and I hope to see more from this author in the future.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2004

    I am so glad I discovered this book!

    I stumbled upon this book in the 'staff recommendations' section of my local bookstore. I am so glad I did! The book is a story told in a style I had never encountered before. Basically we get a sneak peek into the lives of several neighbors on a city street in London. We learn few details about many of them, but we get to observe their interactions with each other. As one character says in the book 'There are remarkable things all the time' and Jon MacGregor points out the tremendous events of everyday life. It was only after I got to the end of the book that I realized that we are never told the name of any of the characters! It's a beautiful book, one that combines suspense and drama and leaves you guessing until the very end! I look forward to the next book Mr. MacGregor comes out with.

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    Posted December 15, 2008

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    Posted August 13, 2009

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    Posted September 6, 2011

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