If the World Were a Village - Second Edition: A Book about the World's People

( 4 )

Overview

The 2nd Edition of the best-selling book which has sold over 400 000 copies in 17 languages ? updated with new content and insights about the world's people. First published to wide acclaim in 2002, this eye-opening book has since become a classic, promoting "world-mindedness" by imagining the world's population ? all 6.8 billion of us ? as a village of just 100 people. Now, If the World Were a Village has been newly revised with updated statistics, several new activities and completely new material on food ...
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Overview

The 2nd Edition of the best-selling book which has sold over 400 000 copies in 17 languages ? updated with new content and insights about the world's people. First published to wide acclaim in 2002, this eye-opening book has since become a classic, promoting "world-mindedness" by imagining the world's population ? all 6.8 billion of us ? as a village of just 100 people. Now, If the World Were a Village has been newly revised with updated statistics, several new activities and completely new material on food security, energy and health. By exploring the lives of the 100 villagers, children will discover that life in other nations is often very different from their own. If the World Were a Village is part of CitizenKid: A collection of books that inform children about the world and inspire them to be better global citizens.
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Editorial Reviews

Booklist
This highly informative book will get kids thinking and asking questions.
Where Toronto
It’s an eye-opener for all.
Horn Book Magazine
Thought-provoking and highly effective, this world-in-miniature will open eyes to a wider view of our planet and its human inhabitants.
From the Publisher
This highly informative book will get kids thinking and asking questions.

It’s an eye-opener for all.

These days, the world seems to be getting smaller. This timely, unique book enhances that sentiment. It is useful for a current understanding of the world’s population.

Thought-provoking and highly effective, this world-in-miniature will open eyes to a wider view of our planet and its human inhabitants.

This amazing book could be used in many different ways across the curriculum.
Each chapter (on topics such as population, food and schooling) is accompanied by bright, folksy illustrations that make this global village look like a lively and interesting place. Includes a section on teaching children about the global village.

Unique format shrinks the world’s population down to 100 and presents who we are, where we live, how fast we are growing, what languages we speak and more.

Children's Literature - Dawna Lisa Buchanan
Bold acrylic paintings accompany this fascinating introduction to the concept of the global community. The author includes simple but powerful information about the world in short, one page clips. He invites readers in by asking them to imagine that 100 people represent the world population and suggesting that by learning about how they live, so that "perhaps we can find out more about our neighbors in the real world and the problems our planet may face in the future (pg. 7)." Educational side notes, sources, and suggestions for use in the classroom or at home are provided for adults. The primary content explores the topics of nationalities, languages, ages, religions, food, air and water, school and work, money and possessions, energy, and health. It quickly becomes clear that grave inequities exist. For example, the text notes that out of the one hundred, 47 people do not have "food security," while 53 of them have enough to be well. Smith uses language that even young readers can appreciate. "A bell calls the young people of the village to school. But for some children, there is no school to go to, or they must work to help their family (pg. 21)." This is an excellent book, useful in science and social studies curriculum or for thoughtful discussion in the home. Reviewer: Dawna Lisa Buchanan
Children's Literature
If the world were a village of 100 people, only seven would have computers, only nine would speak English (22 would speak a dialect of Chinese) and 60 would always be hungry. Understanding such numbers leads to "world-mindedness," says author and teacher David Smith. The statistics about everything from religion to language, electricity to water quality and literacy to money are listed along with bits of explanation—"Not everyone in the global village is encouraged to learn to read, write, and think." There are bright, full-page illustrations in chunky, primitive acrylic. There is a modern, adult feel to the illustrations that gives the book appeal to a wide age range, from young children who can appreciate the simplest statistics to high school students who can debate the implications of the numbers and search for solutions. In addition to a page of explanations and sources for his calculations, Smith offers two pages of games, activities and thought-provoking questions to teach world-mindedness as an approach to life. "Knowing who our neighbors are, where they live and how they live," writes Smith, "will help us live in peace." 2002, Kids Can Press,
— Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
The global village is represented by 100 lively folks who show readers similarities and differences among the planet's people. There are plenty of potential math lessons here as well. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554535958
  • Publisher: Kids Can Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Series: CitizenKid Series
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 82,499
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 840L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 12.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

David J. Smith is a teacher and educational consultant with over 25 years of experience in the classroom and is the creator of the award-winning curriculum "Mapping the World by Heart."

Shelagh Armstrong is a freelance commercial artist who has designed adult book covers, stamps and commemorative coins .If the World Were a Village was her first children's book. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2002

    Remarkable, relevant, unrivaled

    While visiting this site to order another copy of If the World Were a Village for my classroom, I was surprised to discover Mr. VanNoord¿s review. Usually, I glance at posted reviews only casually, but I believe so deeply in the merits of this book that, in this case, I feel a reply is in order. If the World Were a Village shrinks the world¿s population down to a village of 100 and then examines language, religion, income, food, education and the future in numbers that are accessible to a young audience. Mr. VanNoord voiced concern regarding one line of text that pertains to a "what if" scenario of projected population growth, but he has not read the data correctly. To quote from the text ¿ Here¿s what would happen if (boldface mine) the village continued to grow as fast as it is growing now: Today the village of 100 is growing at a rate of slightly less than 2 people a year ¿ In 2250 there would be nearly 3200 people ¿ A very crowded place, with widespread shortages of food, shelter and other resources. It then goes on to state that ¿ However, not everyone agrees that the village will grow this fast, and many groups, such as the United Nations, are working hard to make sure that the village of the future is a good home for all the people who live in it. Mr. Smith has created a relevant and mindful study of the world¿s population. He is not stating that a doomsday scenario is in the works, only that the possibility exists. He does not want young readers to simply close this book and forget about the world¿s problems because "someone else is taking care of it." He wants to engage children, educators and parents alike in a discussion about the ramifications of such a scenario, and to motivate them to work together in finding inventive and positive solutions that will guarantee that the earth is, and will be, a good home for all. Mr. Smith did extensive research for this book, as evidenced by the more than 20 sources cited on the final page of text. These sources include World Population Profile: 1991 to 1998, U.S. Census Bureau, and The United Nations Human Development Report, United Nations Development Programme, 1992¿1998. I applaud both the tenacity and veracity with which Mr. Smith has made his presentation. This is a book that truly belongs in the classroom of every teacher interested in creating a meaningful and stimulating dialogue with his or her students regarding the state of the earth and the people who inhabit it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2009

    Great book

    Loved the book. More people should read it and take heart.

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  • Posted September 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful Book

    As an adult, you think you've heard all statistics about the ratio in demographics around the world. While reading this story to my girls, there was SO much said in minimal words (which kept their attention). The pictures were very colourful, it's definitely worth reading. I was thoroughly impressed with how simple the reading was, explaining densities, ratios, ethnicity, religion, food, and regions in one book. Even as an adult, it's educational.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2005

    A great smorgasbord of living

    Mr. Smith uses this smorgasbord to help our children understand the diverse world we are in. The book guides them to appreciate their counterparts from all walks of life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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