If You Decide to Go to the Moon

( 4 )

Overview


Two artists at the height of their powers have created a beautiful book with an unforgettable message about the moon and an even more important message about the earth. A publishing event!

"If you decide to go to the moon," writes Faith McNulty, "read this book first. It will tellyou how to get there and what to do after youland. The most important part tells you how to get home.
Written in the second person, the text allows the reader to participate in every aspect of the ...

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Overview


Two artists at the height of their powers have created a beautiful book with an unforgettable message about the moon and an even more important message about the earth. A publishing event!

"If you decide to go to the moon," writes Faith McNulty, "read this book first. It will tellyou how to get there and what to do after youland. The most important part tells you how to get home.
Written in the second person, the text allows the reader to participate in every aspect of the journey, from packing ("don't forget your diary and plenty of food") to liftoff (at first you'll feel heavy; don't worry") to traveling thorugh space (where "the moon glows like a pearl in the black, black sky"). The reader lands at the Sea of Tranquility, the site of the first lunar landing

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Hornbook 9/05
Faith McNulty If You Decide to Go to the Moon; illus. by Steven Kellogg
48 pp. Scholastic 10/05 ISBN 0-590-48359-5 $16.99 g
(Primary)
"If you decide to go to the moon..." instructs the opening lines, "read this book before you start." While this may not yet be part of official NASA training, the second-person address takes readers from blastoff to touchdown and back again. McNulty's text is a lovely union of science and lyricism, evoking both the emotions and experiences of the solitary reader-astronaut and the hard facts of space: "When you are thirsty, don't try to pour orange juice into a glass. With no gravity, it would fly into a million drops and become orange juice fog." Kellogg's illustrations feature a cheery blond boy whose sturdy frame bobs optimistically through the journey. Where they shine brightest, however, is with the space- and moonscapes, the watercolors making the most of the stark grays and whites of space, a tiny rocket or the grand curve of the moon emphasizing the vastness and lifelessness of the universe beyond our atmosphere. Despite a sudden left-turn from science to a finger-wagging lesson at the end, as the text exhorts the returning reader-astronaut always to protect life on earth (this accompanied by a two-page gatefold celebrating the variety and richness of that life), this stands as an appropriately thrilling introduction to space travel for young readers. V.

Kirkus 9/1/05 *STARRED*
Many dream of exploring outer space, but this wonderfully engaging guide to space travel walks young readers through the adventure, starting with what to pack on the rocket ship: "Peanut butter, apples, and cake will taste good in space." Gentle warnings issued about meteors ("a collision is unlikely"); the loneliness of space ("Don't look back at the earth"); not pouring juice ("it would fly into a million drops"); and the difficulty of the first step on the Moon ("You will rise in the air and leap forward like a kangaroo") will only encourage and inspire budding astronauts. Indeed, McNulty, elegantly fusing the scientific realities and the dreamy wonders of space travel, finds the perfect partner in Kellogg who accomplishes the same thing visually. Eerily beautiful, cleverly textured moonscapes of ghostly grays and inky blacks contrast dramatically with cheerful full-color spreads (including a spectacular double gatefold) that reflect the beauty and abundance of life on Earth with sunny yellows, grassy greens and sky blues. A powerful, playful tribute to the minutiae and magnificence of space exploration. (Picture book. 7-10)

SLJ 10/1/05 STARRED
*MCNULTY, Faith. If You Decide to Go to the Moon. illus. by Steven Kellogg. unpaged. CIP. Scholastic. Oct. 2005. RTE $16.99. ISBN 0-590-48359-5. LC 2004027755.
K-Gr 3–In this lavish picture book, readers accompany a boy on a fascinating excursion to the moon. The lyrical text provides tips on what to pack and describes the distance to be covered. After blastoff, facts about space travel are mingled with descriptions of what the journey might be like: the loneliness, the lack of gravity, and how you might pass the time. After landing, the text warns: “Your first step will be difficult. You will rise in the air and leap forward like a kangaroo, but once you learn how, walking will be fun.” It also suggests that the moon's lack of sound and color may make it seem like a dream. After viewing the flag left behind by astronauts, it's time to depart. As Earth looms closer, a four-page foldout in a glorious burst of color marks our planet's contrast to the moon's black-and-white shades. These pages depict a variety of wonders: all sorts of animals and landscapes as well as people from different historical periods and locales. The narrative notes, “Air and water are Earth's special blessings. We must guard them well.” The final pages show the boy returning h

Publishers Weekly
In this impressive picture book, an aspiring astronaut imagines a trip to the moon from soup to nuts-and gains a bird's eye-perspective on why it's important to protect his planet. McNulty (The Elephant Who Couldn't Forget) adopts a playful tone as she takes the young hero through preparations, liftoff, a moonwalk and the return trip, mixing hard facts ("If you average 3,750 miles per hour, you will get there in two-and-a-half days) with poetic phrases ("the moon, the mysterious moon,/ glows like a pearl in the black, black sky"). The highlight occurs when the boy astronaut discovers the plaque and flag left by the men of Apollo 11 in 1969, linking him to a long legacy of courageous American space explorers. Kellogg's (Is Your Mama a Llama?) sweeping spreads of realistic space- and moonscapes strike just the right balance of beauty and eeriness; one of the most dramatic shows the hero as a tiny, doll-like figure standing at a point where the moon's silvery, barren landscape meets the pitch-black depths of the galaxy. As the returning astronaut contemplates the earth from the vantage point of space, the narrative turns a bit saccharine ("Air and water are Earth's special blessings./ .../ you promise you will always do your best/ to protect all life on our beautiful Earth"). Yet Kellogg's four-panel gatefold celebrating all the earth's inhabitants adds substance to McNulty's call to action, encompassing whales and penguins, as well as cavemen and contemporary children at a swimming hole against a backdrop of spires, domes and skyscrapers. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-In this lavish picture book, readers accompany a boy on a fascinating excursion to the moon. The lyrical text provides tips on what to pack and describes the distance to be covered. After blastoff, facts about space travel are mingled with descriptions of what the journey might be like: the loneliness, the lack of gravity, and how you might pass the time. After landing, the text warns: "Your first step will be difficult. You will rise in the air and leap forward like a kangaroo, but once you learn how, walking will be fun." It also suggests that the moon's lack of sound and color may make it seem like a dream. After viewing the flag left behind by astronauts, it's time to depart. As Earth looms closer, a four-page foldout in a glorious burst of color marks our planet's contrast to the moon's black-and-white shades. These pages depict a variety of wonders: all sorts of animals and landscapes as well as people from different historical periods and locales. The narrative notes, "Air and water are Earth's special blessings. We must guard them well." The final pages show the boy returning home. Rich artwork complements the strong text. Kellogg's generous splashes of bright hues in the Earth and shipboard scenes juxtaposed with the somber moonscapes set the appropriate moods. Houston, we have a winner!-DeAnn Tabuchi, San Anselmo Public Library, CA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Many dream of exploring outer space, but this wonderfully engaging guide to space travel walks young readers through the adventure, starting with what to pack on the rocket ship: "Peanut butter, apples, and cake will taste good in space." Gentle warnings issued about meteors ("a collision is unlikely"); the loneliness of space ("Don't look back at the earth"); not pouring juice ("it would fly into a million drops"); and the difficulty of the first step on the Moon ("You will rise in the air and leap forward like a kangaroo") will only encourage and inspire budding astronauts. Indeed, McNulty, elegantly fusing the scientific realities and the dreamy wonders of space travel, finds the perfect partner in Kellogg who accomplishes the same thing visually. Eerily beautiful, cleverly textured moonscapes of ghostly grays and inky blacks contrast dramatically with cheerful full-color spreads (including a spectacular double gatefold) that reflect the beauty and abundance of life on Earth with sunny yellows, grassy greens and sky blues. A powerful, playful tribute to the minutiae and magnificence of space exploration. (Picture book. 7-10)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780590483599
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/28/2005
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 122,709
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD690L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 10.25 (w) x 11.25 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Meet the Author


Faith McNulty was born in New York City. She attended private schools, and left college after two years to work for The New York Daily News. Because she has a deep interest in animals and their behavior, she wrote about animals for The New Yorker for twenty years. Many of her experiences as an animal writer are the basis for her current writings for children. Faith also worked as a children’s book reviewer for The New Yorker magazine from 1979 to 1991. Currently she lives at her farm in Rhode Island and writes children’s books.

Steven Kellogg has illustrated more than a hundred books, including IS YOUR MAMA A LLAMA? and THE DAY JIMMY'S BOA ATE THE WASH. He has also retold and illustrated the adventures of tall-tale heroes such as Paul Bunyan, Mike Fink, and Johnny Appleseed. He lives in Essex, New York.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 8, 2011

    LOVE THIS BOOK!

    I purchased this book for a college course dedicated to childrens literature. This book was such a great choice! The story as well as the illustrations are wonderful! It is full of color and a joy to read. The students truly love it! This is a MUST HAVE for anyones library. This book would be great for anyone with a child in primary grades! Very educational and very fun to read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2008

    Trip to Moon

    Imagine a space exploration trip as a child and you have an opportunity to go all by yourself. This story gives a step by step explanation on a trip to the moon. It begins by suggesting the necessary items need to travel. Next, the reader is informed on what to do while traveling through space. Once the destination to the moon has been reached, the reader will learn what it is like to be on the moon. Finally, there are necessary steps to do when going back home. This story allows readers to get a good glimpse of space travel to the moon. Evaluation: This story gives a step-by-step portrayal on what it is like to go to the moon. The author has taken the time to give details on how to prepare, space travel, arrival/study of moon and the trip home. The story is written in child friendly language which appeals to younger audience. The text is nicely put together in sequential order from start to finish of a journey to the moon. It is organized in a writing style that allows concepts and information to be comprehended in the most abstract manner. The author describes the setting in a way that makes readers actually feel like they are on the moon. The illustrations in this book actually look real. From the colors of the planets to the spaceship, look as realistic as they could get for being close to reality. Overall, this book is dazzling! The illustrations maintain and broaden the text, and are amazing to look at. This book would be great to use in a classroom if you are studying space or doing an imaginary trip to the moon. I actually used this when my students and I were studying information about the moon. It was a good trade book to use besides the textbook because it allowed students to pretend they were apart of space travel. This book is written for children from kindergarten to third grade. Some classroom activities could be to compare and contrast the moon and earth with a Venn diagram, complete a KWL chart about the moon, or keep a journal of an imaginary trip to the moon. There really are not any concerns or issues for using this book in the classroom.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2007

    McNulty weaves in factual information about the moon within an adventure

    The writing style of the book makes a reader feel as though they truly signed up to go to the moon and this is their itinerary, step-by-step to the moon. This book has been made user friendly for the younger audience. McNulty has done a wonderful job at breaking concepts down to simplistic terms for readers to comprehend. The illustrations in this book are incredible! Kellogg has used realistic colors to represent the earth and moon. Kellogg has used space nicely in this book¿objects that are described to be far away are smaller than the objects that are up front. The texture of this four-page-spread shows movement in the water, fur on the animals, and wrinkles in the leathery skin of other animals. The four-page-spread is very nicely illustrated. All four pages bleed into the other. The colors and detail in these four pages are incredible! Overall, this book is stunning! The illustrations support and extend the text, and are amazing to look at. The text is nicely put together in sequential order from start to finish of a journey to the moon. There are facts within the story that make it a wonderful resource in a classroom. I will definitely use this book in my own classroom, whether it be for an imaginary trip to the moon for fun, or as the start of a unit on the moon and space.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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